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MHOHM BROADCASTING COMPANY, Inc. 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
■ R0 CKEF£LL£« PLAZA, NEW YORK, N. Y. 




SECRET STORY^SETH PARKER'S COMEBACK 




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RADIO STARS 



"OUTRAGEOUS!" S*ys MODERN SOCIETY 

"SPLENDID!" Says- THE MODERN DENTIST 




IT ISN'T BEING DONE, BUT IT'S 



TO PREVENT "PINK TOOTH BRUSH 



CAN'T you just hear the shocked 
whispers flash around a dinner table 
at her conduct? . . . "How terrible". . . 
"How perfectly awful" . . . And they'd 
be right — from a social angle. 

But your dentist would come to her de- 
fense — promptly and emphatically. 

"That's an immensely valuable lesson 
in the proper care of the teeth and 
gums," would be his reaction . . . "Vig- 
orous chewing, rougher foods, and more 
primitive eating generally, would stop 
a host of complaints about gum dis- 



orders — and about 'pink tooth brush.' " 
For all dentists know that soft, mod- 
ern foods deprive teeth and gums of 
what they most need — plenty of exer- 
cise. And of course, "pink tooth brush" 
is just a way your gums have of asking 
for your help, and for better care. 

DON'T NEGLECT "PINK TOOTH BRUSH!" 

Keep your teeth white— not dingy. Keep 
your gums firm and hard — not sensitive 
and tender. Keep that tinge of "pink" 
off your tooth brush. And keep gum 
disorders — gingivitis, pyorrhea and 




Vincent's disease far in the background. 

Use Ipana and massage regularly. 
Every time you brush your teeth, rub a 
little extra Ipana into yourgums.You can 
feel — almost from the first — a change 
toward new healthy firmness, as Ipana 
wakens the lazy gum tissues, and as 
new circulation courses through them. 

Try Ipana on your teeth and gums for 
a month. The improvement in both will 
give you the true explanation of Ipana's 
15-year success in promoting complete 
oral health. 



0 f your teein 



J 



RADIO STARS 



BILIOUSNESS AND 
HEADACHES MADE 
MY LIFE MISERABLE 




RADIO STARS 

CURTIS MITCHELL, EDITOR 

A BR 1 1 L AM AR Q LIE. ART EDITOR 




iThen I traded 
3 minutes for 
Relief 7 



I experimented with all kinds of laxa- 
tives. Then I discovered FEEN-A-MINT. 
I traded three minutes for relief. When- 
ever I feel constipated, I chew delicious 
FEEN-A-MINT for three minutes.* Next 
day I feel like a different person. Of 
course if you aren't willing to spend three 
minutes— jarring "all-at-once "cathartics 
will have to do. But what a difference 
FEEN-A-MINT makes— no cramps, noth- 
ing to cause a habit. Try the three-min- 
ute way yourself . . . 15c and 25c a box. 
ATTENTION, MOTHERS— FEEN -A-MINT 
is ideal for everybody, and 
how children love it! 

afi Longer if you care to 



better 
because 

, you 
chew it 




Sixteen Stunning Stories 

Their Studio's on the Street 12 

How Not to Crash Radio Helen Hover 16 

The Secret Story of Seth Parker's Comeback William Stuart 24 

That Meltin' Voice (James Melton) Jay Kieffer 26 

Summer Show Peter Peters 30 

His Own Worst Enemy (Ted Husing) James Cannon 34 

She Got What She Wanted (Francia White) 34 

He Said "No," Just Like That! (Wendell Hall) 35 

Southern Belle on Broadway (Helen Claire) Ethel M. Pomeroy 36 

Old Tent Showman (Charles Winninger) 36 

A Most Amazing Lady (Irene Rich) 37 

For Better— Not Worse (Donna Damerel) Elizabeth Walker 41 

Carol Deis Confesses William L. Stuart 42 

What's Behind Joe Cook? Bland Mulholland 43 

The Man Who Lost Everything (Al Goodman) Petggy Wells 44 

Tony and Gus (Mario Chamlee and George Frame Brown) 46 

Five Fascinating Features 

Gossip at a Glance 28 

Crazy Captions Contest 32 

Radio's Merry-go-rcund 38 

Radio Stars Junior: 

Children's Programs 47 

Junior Journal 48 

In King Arthur Land (a story) 48 

The Club Room 49 

Barbara Jo Allen 52 



Nine Nifty Departments 

The Listeners' League Gazette 6 

The Board of Review 10 

Keep Young and Beautiful 14 

For Distinguished Service 

to Radio 19 



Portrait Album 20 

I Cover the Studios 28 

Radio Stars' Cooking School 50 

Programs Day by Day 56 

Here are the Answers 100 



Cover by EARL CHRISTY 



Radio Stars published monthly and copyrighted. 103."). by Dell Publishing Co.. Inc. Office of 
publication at Washington anil South Avenues. Dunelien. X. J. Executive and editorial offices. 
141) Madison Avenue, New York. N. Y. George Delacorte, Jr., Pres.! H. Meyer. Vlce-Pres. ; J. 
Fred Henry. Vice- Pres. ; M. Delacorte, Sec y. Vol. 7, No. 1, October, 19:15. printed In TJ. S. A. 
Single copy price 10 cents. Subscription price in the United States. $1.00 a year. Entered as 
second-cluss matter August 5, 1932. at the Post Ottlee at Dunelien, N. J., under the act of 
March 3, 1S7U. The publisher accepts no responsibility lor the return of unsolicited material. 




4 



RADIO STARS 




aftsnma 



*<ALL THAT I KNOW... I KNOW BY LOVE ALONE 



95 



The heart of a man called to the heart of a 
woman. "We love", it said, "and love is all." 
Heart answered heart. With eyes open to 
what she was leaving forever behind her, 
she went where love called... to dark de- 
spair or unimaginable bliss. It is a drama of 
deep, human emotions, of man and woman 
gripped by circumstance, moved by forces 
bigger than they— a great drama, portrayed 
by players of genius and produced with the 



A Metro - Gold w y n • Mayer Picture, 




fidelity, insight and skill which made'David 
Copperfield" an unforgettable experience. 

BARTHOLOMEW 

(\ou remember him as "David Copperfield") 

with MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN 
MAY ROBSON • BASIL RATHBONE 

CLARENCE BROWN'S 

Production 



Produced by David O. Selznick 

5 



RADIO STARS 



R. Wilson 
Brown, 
D i rector 



OSTENERS U 



NATIONAL 
EDITION 



Vol. 1, No. 5 



NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



October, 1935 



LEAGUE TALK 

By Wilson Brown, Director 



Willing workers among our 
members have asked me: "How 
can we be of service to radio 
and to the League?" That is 
a welcomed question for it is 
proof of the interest members 
have in the purpose of the 
League. 

There is an article appear- 
ing elsewhere on this page 
telling how you can be of 
service in the matter of mak- 
ing suggestions and criticisms. 
Now let me suggest some other 
ways. 

All of you have a favorite 
program, and you can be do- 
ing a double service if you 
will try to interest your friends 
in it. First, you'll be doing 
those friends a favor. Second- 
ly, you will be contributing a 
direct service to the sponsor in 
increasing his audience. 

If you like the work of an 
artist, or if you particularly- 
like a certain program, let that 
be known. W rite letters ! Un- 
til our master minds of the 
studios figure out some way of 
registering your smiles and 
frowns, the letters you write 
are the only indication artists 
and sponsors have of their re- 
ception. Such letters may be 
addressed to the artists in care 
of The Listeners' League of 
America, 149 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y., and they 
will be sent directly to the 
sponsors or artists. 

When a sponsor asks you to 
buy his product, he figures 
ycu'll find it to be what he 
claims and maybe become a 
regular customer. So how 
about giving him a fifty-fifty 
chance? That is, try his prod- 
uct. You may find it exactly 
what you want. Too, you 
will be showing your apprecia- 
tion of his program and the 
artists he has selected to 
feature on that program. 

By doing these things, you 
will show your interest in 
radio by direct services. And 
when you serve radio, you 
serve the League. 

What else can you do to 
help? Well, if you've found 
the League to be what we 
claimed, maybe you'd be will- 
ing to boost it among your 
friends. Let them know about 
the work we are doing. Per- 
haps they will become mem- 
bers. As membership increases, 
so will the accomplishments. 

6 



MRS. CONNOR, BUFFALO, 
PRESIDENT OF LARGEST 
CHAPTER YET FORMED 



She Got Together Sixty Persons to Fcrm 
Chapter No. 1 of the Muriel Wilson Club 



To Mrs. Crissie Connor of 
406 Elm Street, Buffalo, N. Y., 
goes the honor of being the 
president of the largest chap- 
ter yet to be formed in the 
Listeners' League of America. 
Mrs. Connor organized and 
was elected president of sixty 
loyal Muriel Wilson followers 
and, being the first to form in 
behalf of the Showboat so- 
prano, was granted Chapter 
No. 1. 

The large majority of the 
members are Buffalo residents 
with other members being from 
Kenmore, Cheektowoga and 
Lackawanna, N. Y. Likewise, 
the majority are connected with 
the Kleinhans Company of 
Buffalo. 

The second chapter to be 
formed for Miss Wilson is in 
Philadelphia, Pa., and has as 
its president Miss Anna Ryan. 
The secretary-treasurer is Miss 
Martha L. Townsend. This 
club was formed five months 
ago and shows promise of en- 
rolling many new members 
now that it is affiliated with the 
League. 



SHUT-INS WELCOME 
LEAGUE AS AN AID 



There are many loyal radio 
listeners who, because of physi- 
cal handicaps, were unable to 
take part in regular fan clubs 
or to organize clubs of their 
own. The League has changed 
that. To the shut-ins, the 
club of their favorite artists is 
brought to their bedside. 

Many shut-ins have written 
the League, enrolled in various 
chapters, and are among the 
most active members. This 
letter from Miss Jennie Blanco, 
Box 206, Duarte, Calif., shows 
what the League means to her : 
"Congratulations to the League 
of America. For a long time 
I have been wanting to join a 
Guy Lombardo club but it was 
impossible for me because I'm 
a shut-in. But now you have 
made it possible for me. And 
I appreciate it very much. 
Wishing the League the great- 
est success, I remain, yours 
gratefully." 



RADIO PROGRAMS ON 
THE SPOT AS LISTENERS 
REGISTER CRITICISMS 

LEAGUE INVITES MEMBERS TO MAKE SUGGESTIONS 
FORTHE GENERAL IMPROVEMENT OF BROADCASTING 



Are you convinced that your 
favorite artist is being given the 
full consideration he deserves 
by his sponsor? 

Does his program present 
him in the way you would have 
him presented? 

Are you satisfied that your 
favorite artist is doing his 
best — or could you make some 
suggestions that would improve 
his work. 

And what do you think of 
these so-called horror pro- 
grams? What programs, for 
example, do you think would 
be objectionable for children to 
hear ? 

What do you call a poor 
program — one that you wouldn't 
go out of your way to hear ? 

These are a few of the ques- 
tions sponsors and artists want 
to know. These are the ques- 
tions the League expects to 
answer by giving to you listen- 
ers the voice to make your 
likes and dislikes known. To 
this end the League will work 
— to realize two of its purposes: 
( 1 ) To champion the cause of 
the artists around whose talents 
the business of broadcasting is 
built; and (2) To protect list- 
eners from the abuses of poor 
or objectionable programs. 

The League invites its mem- 
bers to give some serious 
thought to these and other 
similar questions and offer some 
good constructive criticism and 
suggestions. Listeners, as 
champions of the artists, will 
be doing a great service to those 
artists by making those sugges- 
tions. It is the only way the 
public reaction to their pro- 
grams can be tested. Like- 
wise, as radio's audience, you 
will be honoring the business of 
broadcasting by making your 
likes and dislikes known. You 
are the ones artists and spon- 
sors want to please for you 
are the ones for whom pro- 
grams are broadcast. 

What is your opinion, for 
example, of the way singers 
are presented? Do you like 
Frank Parker's work as a 
comedian or do you think it 
would be to his advantage to 



stick to singing? Perhaps you 
think he would make a good 
master of ceremonies on his own 
program in the manner of the 
Rudy Vallee type of show. 
Should Lanny Ross be in love 
with Mary Lou in the story 
part of his Showboat program? 
Would John Charles Thomas' 
program be better if it was 
confined to a straight concert 
as it was the year before? 

So many actors and actresses 
say they are hidden in the 
background, so often merely 
being the speaking voice of 
some famous singer, or pre- 
( Please turn to page 8) 

membersTraise 
idea of league 

As radio artists and execu- 
tives have been generous in 
their praise of the League, so 
have many members from 
coast to coast. The following 
are but a few of many such 
comments received : 

"I consider the idea of having 
a Listeners' League an excel- 
lent method of improving radio 
programs as well as building 
up one's favorite star." — Fred- 
erick James, Easton, Pa. 

"I am joining your League 
because anything sponsored by 
Radio Stars must be good." — 
Edward Richardson, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

"I think the Listeners' League 
is the best idea any magazine 
has ever produced. I know I 
will enjoy being a member and 
1 hope the League has the best 
of success." — Alice Alligood, 
FayettevUlc, X. C. 

"I think that Radio Stars 
magazine is one of the best 
radio magazines on the market. 
That is the reason I wish to 
join the Listeners' League of 
America." — Bruce Killian, 
West Reading, Pa. 

"Congrats to whomever the 
brain trust genius is who 
thought up this idea. I think 
it must have come in answer 
to my most fervent prayers." — 
Ardell Beyer, Union City, N. J. 
(Please turn to page S) 



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7 



RADIO STARS 



October, 1935 



THE LISTENERS' LEAGUE GAZETTE 



Page 2 



CHAPTERS SEEK 

NEW MEMBERS 



Several members, desirous of 
forming chapters, have inquired 
of names and addresses of 
others who might be interested 
in joining special chapters. 

Matilda Landsman, 1372 
Grant Avenue, New York.N.Y., 
would like to start a chap- 
ter in behalf of Eddie Duchin. 
She wants others interested in 
joining such a chapter to write 
her. 

Martha Sessoms, 15 Murdock 
Ave., Asheville, N. C, would 
like to hear from fans of 
Grace and Eddie Albert, "The 
Honey mooners." 

Max Baer fans are asked to 
write Miss Bernadine Palkovic, 
14 lohn Street, Johnstown, 
N. Y. 

Ruth A. Lukens of 49 Gates 
Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., is 
interested in hearing from 
Benny Goodman fans. 



THOUSANDS CONTINUE 
TO JOIN THE LEAGUE 

Several New Chapters Formed, 
But Marconi Members Are Far 
In The Lead 



The League presents the fol- 
lowing list of new chapters and 
new members. There have 
been many more members to 
join, however the list is so long 
that space will not permit the 
publication of the entire list in 
this issue. The roll of mem- 
bers will be continued in the 
next issue. 

MURIEL WILSON, Chapter No. I: Mrs. 
Crissie Connor. 4fl« Elm St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Al Merlihan, 108 Legion Dr., 
Kenmore. N. Y. ; Mrs. T. Merlihan. 108 
Legion Dr., Kenmore, N. Y.;*Donal 
McCarty, 534 Delaware Ave.. Buffalo. 
N. Y. ; Mrs. Mary Pendercast, 927 
Washington St., Buffalo. N. Y. ; Louise 
Hudolph, KtiS La Salle Ave.. Buffalo, 
Js'. Y. ; Muriel Marky, Indian Kd.. 
ChceMnwnga. N. Y. ; Evelyn Eckert, 128 
Yerplanek. Buffalo. N. Y. ; 3. G. 
SchWBukel, 2901 Bailey Ave., Buffalo. 
N. Y ; Lena Wilke. l. r .S Dodge. Buffalo. 
N. Y. ; Leonard J. Simnis, 83 Manches- 
ter I'l., Buffalo. N. Y. ; Miss Gerte 
Shannon, 47 Alahama St., Buffalo. 
N. Y'. ; Marie Caffery. 87 Eaglewood 
Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. : Lottie lucrezak, 
310 Gihson St.. Buffalo, N. Y.; Mrs. 
Loretta Merlihan. 10S Legion Dr., Ken- 
more. N. Y. ; Mildred Cirarell. 409 
Genesee St.. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Mrs. Wm. 
Augstell, 134 North-land. Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Mrs. Mary Murphy, 91 Putnam, Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Patrick Haarrlgan, 30 S. Geary 
St., Buffalo. N. Y.; Bussell L. I'rovino, 
54 Virginia St.. Buffalo, N. Y. : .lesse 
N. Packard. 2G1 Sterling Ave., Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Genevieve Stone, 579 West Ave., 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; William M. MrCauley, 
30 Milford St.. Buffalo. N. Y. : Florence 
Monaco, 297 Ingham Ave., Lackawanna, 
N. Y. ; Agatha Karkowski, 125 Cort St., 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; Eva Gerlach. 592 Scran 
St., Buffalo, N. Y.; P. L. Clayton, 55 
Bradley, Buffalo, N. Y. : Edwin F. 
Gastcl. lrifi Shoshone. Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
A. H. Hollingworth. 415 Lafayette, 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; S. Spats. 1310 Waldcn 
St.. Buffalo. N. Y. ; M. Juloeak, 310 



Gibson, Buffalo. N. Y. ; Miss Evelyn- 
Blerman, 15 Purdy St., Buffalo. N. Y. ; 
Joe Eisinger, 230 Allen St.. Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; W. H. Dauberger, 274 Victoria 
Blvd.. Kenmore. N. Y. ; Miss Aileen 
Buncy, 1293 Bailey Ave., Buffalo. N. Y. ; 
Jennie Pearl, 2G3. Hudson St.. Buffalo, 
N. Y'. ; U. Littlefleld. 62 Montrose, 
Buffalo, N. Y. : Mrs. Davies, Kleinhans 
Co.. Buffalo. N. Y. ; Fred A. Rugg. 159 
Dodge St., Buffalo. N. Y. ; Edwin H. 
Weber, 17 Huntington, Buffalo, N. I.J 
ltuth A. Vox, 43 17th St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Elmer A. Streicher. 437 Hum- 
boldt Pkwy.. Buffalo, N. Y. ; John 
Kurtz, 239 Peach St.. Buffalo. N. Y. ; 
Margaret Pearl. 203 Pearl St.. Buffalo, 
N. Y. : Helen Pendergast, 927 Washing- 
ton, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Mrs. Lillian Kes- 
tree, 592 Swan St., Buffalo, N. Y. ; John 
A. Geary. 70 Manemont. Buffalo. N. Y. ; 
Mrs. Louise Boesl. 312 Maple St.. 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; Mrs. M. Eisenger. 43S 
Taunton. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Ruth M. Ship- 
man, 435 Herkimer St.. Buffalo, N. Y. : 
Rose M. Fitzsimmons, 38 Whitfield. 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; Alma M. Weellen. 406 
Elm St.. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Mrs. Harry 
Dornan. 31 Weyand St., Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Grace E. Augstell, 134 Northland Ave.. 
Buffalo, N. Y. : Mrs. R. Urban, 141 
Woltz Ave., Buffalo, N. Y'. ; Florence 
Kaskowski, 125 Cort St., Buffalo. N. Y. ; 
E. M. Bikelow. 1150 Kenmore Ave.. 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; Loretta Feger, 156 16th 
St.. Buffalo. N. Y. ; Thelma Dauberger, 
274 Victoria Blvd., Kenmore, N. Y. ; 
Louis Benzin, 483 McKinley, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

BOB CROSBY, Chapter No. I: Miss B. 
Mulvey. 3SS Adams St., Dorchester, 
Mass. ; Mrs. Ruth Porter . 161 Granite 
Ave., Dorchester. Mass. ; Albert Porter. 
161 Granite Ave.. Dorchester, Mass.; 
Paul Sheehan. 372 Adams St.. Dor- 
chester, Mass. ; Edith W. Sheehan. 372 
Adams St., Dorchester. Mass.; Inez H. 
Mulvey, 38S Adams St.. Dorchester, 
Mass. ; Mr s. Leveroni, 165 Hamilton 
Ave., Wollaston, Mass.; Olive Berry. 372 
Adams St.. Dorchester, Mass.; Robert 
VV. Garland, 3SS Adams St., Dorchester, 
Mass.; Florence Greene. 388 Adams St., 
Dorchester, Mass. 

THE PICKENS SISTERS, Chapter No. I: 

Miss Janet Thorsen, 15 Argyle Road. 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Grace Melvin. 33 Ar- 
gyle Road. Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Ann 
O'Leary, 9 Argyle Road. Brooklyn. 
N. Y. ; Dorothy Melvin. 33 Argyle Road. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Marilyn Lake, 21 Ar- 
gyle Road. Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Joan Ga- 
lenski. 21 Argyle Road. Brooklyn. N. Y ; 
Jane Christian, 9 Argyle Road. Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. : Norma Thorsen, 15 Argyle 
Road, Brooklyn. N. Y. ; Betty Galenskt. 
21 Argyle Road, Brooklyn. N. Y. ; Ma- 
rion Irll. 58 Argyle Road. Brooklyn. 
N. Y. 

ANNETTE HANSHAW. Chapter No. I: 

Miss Virginia Shelton. 340 Murray St.. 
Greensboro, N. C. ; Marie C. Basile. 14- 
36 26th Ave.. Long Island City. N. Y". ; 
Mildred Brown. Battle Creek, la.; An- 
nette .1. Shreian. 45 Barclay St.. Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Eunice Adams, 15 East Brook 
Rd.. Walton. N. Y. ; Miss B. O'Neil. 249 
Torrens Ave.. Toronto. Out.. Canada; 
Gladys Iseminger. Funkstown. Md. : Lc- 
titia Plante, 56 Bank St., Winsted, 
Conn. : Helen Pen ley, Candler. N. C. ; 
Margaret Messina, 4S9 Twelfth St., 
Schenectady. N. Y. ; Natalie Johnson, 
56 Bank St., Bridgeport. Conn. 

LORETTA LEE. Chapter No. I: Frederick 
James, 025 Pardee St., Easton, Pa.; 
Melvin Dickey, 412 Porter St.. Easton, 
Pa.: Aubrey James, 625 Pardee St., 
Easton. Pa.; Howard James, 625 Pardee 
St.. Easton, Pa.; Miss M. E. Newklrk. 
020 Coleman St.. Easton. Pa.; William 
Heller Roberts, 501 Mcixsel St.. Easton. 
Pa.; Robert Schuh. 021 Pardee St., 
Easton, Pa. : Waldo Strouse. 620 Par- 
dee St.. Easton, Pa.; Miss Jeanne 
Titus. S31 Burke St.. Easton, Pa. 

LORETTA LEE, Marconi, Elmer J. 
Palmer, 637 Center. Evanston, VVyo. 

DICK POWELL, Marconi: Tomnrye Smith, 
Jr., 3123 Avenue R, Galveston. Tex.; 
Bertha La Monlagne, 123 Waterman St.. 
Providence, R. I.; June Wilson. While- 
land. Ind. : Rita Cullen, 10 Thompson 
St.. Hvde Park, Mass.; Miss Marion 
Gardner. 173 Henry St., Halifax, N. S.. 
Canada; Mary E. Meant, R.F.D. No. 2, 
Lorkport. N. Y. : Miss Diane Manners. 
607 East 10th Ave.. Corsicana, Tex. 

JESSICA DRAGONETTE, Marconi: 

Gladys McLaughlin. S. Broadway, De 
Pcrc, Wis. ; Margaret Vlnce. 326 Dela- 



ware Ave.. Lorain, O. ; Mary Vandegrift, 
1125 So. High St.. Columbia. Tenn. : 
Mrs. Maude Water-house. 2833 Univer- 
sity Ave.. Des Moines, la.; William M. 
Dalrynrple, 6212 Lincoln Ave., Morton 
Grove, 111. ; Carolyn V. Kovacevlc, State 
Sanatorium, Cresson, Pa.; VV. S. Col- 
lum. 51 Herschel St.. East Lynn. Mass. 

WAYNE KING, Marconi: Marguerite 
Koellner, 2030 Gren St.. Racine. Wis.; 
Helen Seiloff, 740 Lewereorz Ave.. De- 
troit. Mich.; Marguerite Belisle. 6533 
W. Fort St., Detroit, Mich.; Miss Alice 
Lcsslie, 17 Newell Place. No. Arlington. 
N. J. 

GRACE AND EDDIE ALBERT, Marconi: 

Martha Sessoms, 15 Murdock Ave., 
Asheville, N. C. 

JACK BENNY, Marconi: Richard Alford. 
853 Linden Ave.. Long Beach, Calif.; 
Adah A. Dipert, 320 E. 4th. Box 234, 
Willinglon, Kan. ; Edward Richardson, 
3206 Salmon St.. Philadelphia. Pa.; G. 
Manahan, 53 Crescent St.. Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Marie Barda, 1274 s i Mullen 
Ave., Los Angeles, Calif.; Maurice 
Denbo. 912 So. 9th St., Camden. N. J.; 
Bruce Killion, 417 Oak Terrace. West 
Reading, Pa. 

PHIL HARRIS. Marconi: Miss Verna 
Gancrott, 109 Hughes St.. Luzerne. Pa. 

CAB CALLOWAY, Marconi: Cluk Lang. 
The Falls, Shawinigah Falls. Que., 
Canada. 

WALTER WINCHELL. Marconi: Mary- 
Driver, 323 Kolonama St. , Staunton. 
Va. 

WALTER O'KEEFE, Marconi: William 
Thompson, 1559 Thurston Ave., Bono- 
lulu. Hawaii. 

(.Continued on page 98) 



RADIO PROGRAMS 
ON THE SPOT AS 
LISTENERS REGIS- 
TER CRITICISMS 

(Continued from page 6, col. 4) 

sented under the name of a 
character in a play rather than 
under their own name. Elsie 
Hitz, Gertrude Berg, Cornelia 
Otis Skinner and others have 
been the stars of their own 
programs. Rosaline Greene, 
Adele Ronson, Peggy Allenby 
and others have usually been in 
lesser roles, some of which do 
not even mention their names. 
Is this the way you would 
have it ? 

When you attend a movie, 
the first things you see on the 
screen are the names of the 
producer, the director, the film 
editor, the author and a host of 
other individuals who had a 
part in the making of the pic- 
ture. Such is usually missing 
from radio programs. Do you 
think the men and women who 
write the show and put ■ it to- 
gether, tasks that call for skill- 
ful work, should get some 
credit? Or are you interested 
in knowing who are behind the 
scenes? 

The League wants your com- 
ments. Letters should be ad- 
dressed to Program Depart- 
ment, The Listeners' League of 
America, 149 Madison Avenue, 
New York City, N. Y. 



MISS CLOUGH, NEW 
YORK. HAS FORMED 
THREE CHAPTERS 



Two of Her Chapters Are in 
Behalf of Nelson Eddy and One 
for Rudy Vallee 



Miss Bub Clough of 56 West 
105th Street, New York City, 
is so loyal a radio follower 
that she was not satisfied with 
one chapter but organized and 
is president of three chapters. 
Two are in behalf of Nelson 
Eddy and one is formed for 
Rudy Vallee. 

Miss Clough's members come 
from all sections of the United 
States, Canada, England and 
New Zealand. "And I'll get 
more," she said on a recent 
visit to League headquarters. 

So far, Miss Clough is the 
only person to hold this honor. 



ANSWERING YOUR 

QUESTIONS 



Each month this department 
will undertake to answer ques- 
tions sent in by members. Such 
questions are invited and every 
effort will be made to give 
them prompt and complete 
answers in this column. 

Q. Can a listener be a mem- 
ber of more than one Marconi 
chapter? A. Yes, he can be a 
member of as many as he 
wants. Remember, however, 
that for each chapter he joins, 
a separate membership applica- 
tion is required. 

Q. Is a listener permitted to 
become a member of more than 
one regular chapter? A. Again 
the answer is yes. Also separ- 
ate membership applications are 
necessary. 

Q. If a fan club already in 
existence wishes to affiliate 
with the League is it necessary 
to send in ten applications only 
to make that club a regular 
chapter? A. Ten members are 
all that are necessary to form 
a chapter. But, if a fan club 
of more than ten members 
sends in only ten applications, 
then only those who sent in ap- 
plications are League members. 

Q. Will the League conflict 
in any way with existing fan 
clubs or fan club organizations? 
A. Absolutely not. Instead, 
the League will try to be of 
service to those clubs and or- 
ganizations. 



APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP 

LISTENERS' LEAGUE OF AMERICA, 

149 Madison Avenue, New York City. N. Y. 

Individual Application for Membership 
I. the undersigned, apply for membership in the Listener*' League of America 

In support of (insert name of 

artist whom you are backing). 



Name 

Street. 

City.. 



APPLICATION FOR CHARTER 

LISTENERS' LEAGUE OF AMERICA. 

149 Madison Avenue, New York City, N. Y. 

I. the undersigned, as president of the 

ehapter (Insert name of artist for whom Chapter Is being formed), enelose ten 
"r more Individual membership coupons and apply for a Charier from the 
Listeners' League of America, When this application has been acted upon. It Is 
understood that each of these members will receive membership cards and the 

Chapter will receive its Charter sinned by (Insert name 

of artist for whom Chapter is formed). 

Name 

Street 

■ in 



8 



RADIO STARS 



FIRST PREVIEW OF PARAMOUNT'! 
THE BIG BROADCASUP^OF 1936 



A Picture With More Stars Than Ther 



Are in Heaven! 



Everything's oakie-doakie as 
Jack Oakie takes the air in 
"THE BIG BROADCAST 
OF 1936" 



Bing Crosby sings the 
hit song of the season, 
"I Wished On the Moon" 




A Paramount Picture . . . Directed by Norman Taurog 



Roy Noble, composer of "The Very Thought of You" 
and "Love Is The Sweetest Thing", leads his orchestro 
in his latest piece/ Why Stars Come Out at Night" 



Bill Robinson, greatest of all tap 
dancers, moves his feet to the hot 
rhythm of "Miss Brown to You" 



9 



RADIO STARS 



Bo-Md of Review 



Curtis Mitchell 

Radio Stars Magazine, Chairman 

Alton Cook 
N. Y. World-Telegram. N. Y. C. 
S. A. Coleman 
Wichita Beacon. Wichita, Kan. 

Norman Siegel 
Cleveland Press, Cleveland, 0. 
Andrew W. Smith 
News & Age-Herald. Birmingham. 
Ala. 
Lecta Rider 
Houston Chronicle, Houston, Texas 



Si Steinhauser 

Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Leo Miller 

Bridgeport Herald, Bridgeport, ' Conn. 

Charlotte Greer 

Newark Evening News, Newark, N. J. 

Richard G. Moffett 

Florida Times-Union. Jacksonville, 
Fla. 

James Sullivan 

Louisville Times, Louisville, Ky. 



R. B. Westergaard 

Register & Tribune, Des Moines, la. 

C. L. Kern 

Indianapolis Star, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Larry Wolters 

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, III. 

James E. Chinn 

Evening and Sunday Star, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

H. Dean Fitzer 

Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. 



Vivian M. Gardner 

Wisconsin News. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Joe Haeffner 

Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Andrew W. Foppe 

Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, 0. 

Oscar H. Fernbach 

San Francisco Examiner, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Jack Barnes 

Union-Tribune, San Diego, Cal. 



Columbia Symphonic Hour — How- 
ard Barlow conductor (CBS). 

**** American Album of Familiar Mu- 
sic with Frank Munn, Vivienne 
Segal and Gus Haenschen's orches- 
tra (NBC). 

*★★* Radio City Music Hall Concert 
With Erno Rapee (NBC). 

★ *** Captain Henry's Maxwell House 

Show Boat (NBC). 

**** The Jergens Program with Cor- 
nelia Otis Skinner (NBC). 

+ **★ Cities Service with Jessica Drago- 
nette (NBC). 

**** Voice of Firestone with William 
Daly's orchestra and mixed chorus 
(NBC). 

**★★ Coty presents Ray Noble and his 
dance orchestra (NBC). 

*★★★ The Shell Chateau starring Al Jol- 
son; Guest stars (NBC). 

★ Lucky Strike Presents the Hit 
Parade with Lennie Hayton, Gogo 
DeLys, Johnny Hauser and guest 
stars (NBC). 

★ Lux Radio Theatre (NBC). 

*** "Town Hall Tonight" with Jim 
Harkins and Peter Van Steeden's 
orchestra (NBC). 

**+ Gulf Headliners with James Mel- 
ton, Revelers Quartet, etc. (CBS). 

★ ★★ One Man's Family (NBC). 

★ ★★ House of Glass (NBC). 

★ ★★ Uncle Charlie's Ivory Tent Show 

featuring Charles Winninger, Lois 
Bennett, Conrad Thibault, Jack 
and Loretta Clemens with Don 
Voorhees and his orchestra (NBC). 

** * Goldman Band Concerts (NBC). 

★ *★ Bond Bread show with Frank 

Crumit and Julia Sanderson (CBS). 

★ ★★ Lady Esther program with Wayne 

King and orchestra (CBS) (NBC). 



THE LEADERS 

Here are the five most popular 
programs for the month as se- 
lected by our Board of Review. 
All other programs are grouped 
in four, three, and two star rank. 

1. ****Major Bowes' Amateur 
Hour (NBC) 

2 ★★★*p arc j Program with Fred 
Wariiig's Pennsylvanians and 
Stoopnagle and Budd (CBS) 

3. ****Palmolive Beauty Box 
Theatre — guest artist ; John 
Barclay, baritone ; and others ; 
Al Goodman's orchestra. 
(NBC) 

4 ★★★★Fleischmann Variety 
Hour with Rudy Vallee and 
guests (NBC) 

5. ****Paul Whiteman's Music 
Hall (NBC) 

***** Excellent 
Good 
*** Fair 
** Poor 
* Not Recommended 



**★ Kate Smith's Hudson Series (CBS). 

*** Everett Marshall's Broadway 
Varieties with Elizabeth Lennox 
and Victor Arden's orchestra 
(CBS). 

★ ★★The Fitch Program (NBC). 

*★* Manhattan Merry-Go Round with 
Rachel Carlay, Andy Sannelia's or- 
chestra (NBC). 



★★★Silken Strings with Charles 
Previn's orchestra (NBC). 

*** A. & P. Gypsies with Harry Hor- 
lick's orchestra (NBC). 

★ ★* Contented Program with Gene 

Arnold, the Lullaby Lady, Morgan 
Eastman's orchestra (NBC). 

★ ★★Today's Children (NBC). 

★ ** Sinclair Greater Minstrels (NBC). 

★ ★★ Philip Morris Program with Leo 

Reisman's orchestra and Phil Duey 
(NBC). 

*** Vic and Sade (NBC). 

★ ★★Irene Rich for Welch (NBC). 

★ ★★Death Valley Days (NBC). 
*★★ Roses and Drums (NBC). 
*** Boake Carter (CBS). 

★ ★★ Edwin C. Hill (CBS). 

★ ★★ Eno Crime Clues (NBC). 

*★* Climalene Carnival (NBC). 

**★ One Night Stand with Pick and Pat 
(CBS). 

★ *+ Grand Hotel with Anne Seymour 

and Don Ameche (NBC). 

★ ★★ Ben Bernie and His Orchestra 

(NBC). 

★ ★★ Eddie Duchin and his Fire Chief 

orchestra (NBC). 

*★★ National Barn Dance (NBC). 

★ ★★Major Bowes' Capitol Family 

(NBC). 

★ ★★ Penthouse Serenade — Don Mario 

(NBC). 

★ ★★ The Ivory Stamp Club with Tim 

Healy (NBC). 

★ ★★Carefree Carnival (NBC). 

★ ★★ Campana's First Nighter with Jane 

Meredith and Don Ameche (NBC). 




10 



RADIO STARS 



*** Columbia Dramatic Guild (CBS). 

*** The Adventures of Cracie with Burns 
and Allen (CBS). 

*** Hollywood Hotel with Dick Powell and 
Louella Parsons (CBS). 

*** Heart Throbs of the Hills with Frank 
Luther, trio, Ethel Park Richardson 
(NBC). 

*** Uncle Ezra's Radio Station (NBC). 

**# "Dreams Come True" with Barry Mc- 
Kinley and Ray Sinatra's band (NBC). 

*** Hal Kemp and his orchestra and Babs 
and her brothers (NBC). 

*** Kitchen Party with Frances Lee Barton, 
cooking authority; Martha Meats; AI 
and Lee Reiser (NBC). 

*★* Easy Aces (NBC). 

*** Dream Drama, with Arthur Allen and 
Parker Fenelly (NBC). 

*** Fireside Recitals; Sigurd Nilssen, 
Hardesty Johnson and Graham McNamee 
(NBC). 

★ Stories of the Black Chamber (NBC). 

The Story of Mary Marlin with Joan 
Blaine (CBS). 

*** Waltz Time — Frank Munn, tenor; Ber- 
nice Claire, soprano; and Abe Lyman's 
orchestra (NBC). 

The Garden of Tomorrow, featuring E. 
L. D. Gaymour noted horticulturist 
(CBS). 

Broadways of Romance; featuring Jerry 
Cooper, Roger Kinne and Freddie Rich's 
orchestra (CBS). 

★ Five Star Jones (CBS). 

Circus Nights in Silvertown featuring 
Joe Cook with B. A. Rolfe's orchestra 
(NBC). 

*** Fibber McGee and Molly (NBC). 

**+ Home on the Range — John Charles 
Thomas and Wm. Daly's orchestra 
(NBC). 

*** Tony & Gus with Mario Chamlee and 
George Frame Brown (NBC). 

*★* Lucky Smith with Max Baer (NBC). 

*** Rhythm at Eight — Ethel Merman, Ted 
Husing and Al Goodman's orchestra 
(CBS). 

**+ Edgar A. Guest in Welcome Valley 
(NBC). 

*** Mexican Musical Tours — Angell Mer- 
cado and his Mexican orchestra (NBC). 

**+ Sunset Dreams — Morrin Sisters, Ranch 
Boys, trios (NBC). 

*** Esso Marketeers present Guy Lombardo 
(CBS). 

*★* N T G and his Girls (NBC). 
**★ Evening in Paris (NBC). 

★ Lud Gluskin Presents (CBS). 

it-k-k Socony Sketchbook — Johnny Green and 
his orchestra, Virginia Verrill and 
Christopher Morley (CBS). 

+ *# Willard Robison and his Deep River 
orchestra with Loulie Jean Norman 
(NBC). 

★ + * America's First Rhythm Symphony— 

De Wolf Hopper (NBC). 

*** Hits and Bits (NBC). 
*★* Seth Parker (NBC). 

*** "Lavender and Old Lace" with Frank 
Munn and Gus Haenschen's orchestra 
(CBS). 

*** National Amateur Night with Ray Per- 
kins (CBS). 

** Voice of Experience (CBS). 

** Romance of Helen Trent (CBS). 

** The Gumps (CBS). 

** Marie, The Little French Princess (CBS). 

** Gigantic Pictures, Inc. — musical com- 
edy starring Sam Hearn, Johnny Blue 
and orchestra (NBC). 

** The Shadow (CBS). 




£ FE.S1 CO., 1933 



jP ^ — Billy's mother did get rid of tattle- 
• * tale gray with Fels-Naptha Soap— 
and so can you! 

Try it! Get some Fels-Naptha 



at your grocer's today— and see 
how safely and beautifully it washes 
even your very daintiest things- 
how easy it is on your hands! 

11 



RADIO STARS 




"What country is Ethiopia in?" asked Jerry Belcher. "What beautiful big, brown 
eyes you have,',' answered the sweet young thing — into the mike! Jerry gasped. 
"What do you want for Christmas?" he asked. "You!" said she very sweetly. 

Tkei* Studio's oh ike 



"WHICH end of a cow gets up first?" 
"Hew many legs has an octogenarian?" 
"Whose picture is on a ten dollar bill?" 
"Can a chicken swiyn?" 

"A monkey sits in the center of a circular 
table. You walk about the table. As you walk, the 
monkey turns facing you all the time. When you get back 
to your starting point, you have walked around the table, 
haven't you, but have you zualked around the monkey?" 

Even if you are Professor Einstein's pet honor-roll 
student, this departent offers odds that you'll not have 
a ready answer for most of those questions. Nor have 
most of the bewildered souls whose faltering answers 
probably have trickled into your parlors these recent, 
sultry months. 

The program is called Vox Pop, the voice of the people. 
It consists of two microphones, a sidewalk, and two tall 
and energetic gentlemen from Texas named Jerrv Belcher 
and Parks Johnson. Plus, of course, whatever unwary 
citizens are captured, by these resistless man-hunters. 

If you haven't heard it, you've got a busy half-hour 
the next Sunday night you spend at home. It is guar- 
anteed to prod, puzzle, and otherwise agitate vour addled 



brain until you swear you'll never listen to it again — and 
then you come back once more to see how little or how 
much you know compared to the ladies and gentlemen 
picked up by the unquenchable Texans. 

It all began early last July when certain staid New 
Yorkers were startled to find in their midst two of the 
most remarkable young men ever to hit the town. Young 
men who grasped you gently by the elbow and led you to 
a battery of microphones; or if you protested, who 
wheedled with such a show of Southern charm that you 
found yourself surprisingly saying your piece into an 
electric ear that reached south to Dixie and west to the 
Mississippi. 

"Is Mickey Mouse a cat or a dog?" 
"Can you swallow without moving your Adam's apple?" 
"Which way docs a pig's tail curl.'" 
"What's the difference between the words, ravel and 
unravel?" 

"What sort of a weapon did Samson use to kill 
Goliath?" 

It is questions like that the listener gets as he sits in 



Jerry Belcher and Parks Johnson put over a new idea 

12 



RADIO STARS 




The idea sprang to life three 
years ago in Houston, Texas. 
Now it has come to New York. 



Steeei 



his comfortable chair safely out of 
the line of fire. But think of the 
fellow who is doing his level best 
to be bright for Messrs. Johnson 
and Belcher. 

They got one man the other night 
who was particularly out of his 
depth. Belcher gave him a knock- 
out punch with: "Who wrote 
Gray's Elegy?" 

"Gray's Elegy?" said the ques- 
tionee. "Hm-m-m-m ... I can't 
think right now who the author 
was." 

The idea for these cute and crazy 
cross-examinations sprang to life 
three years ago in Houston, Texas. 
Listeners to Station KTRH still re- 
gret that their favorite half-hour 
up and left its birthplace for a trial 
in radio's capital, New York. 

The idea was born on the very 
day Ted (Continued on page 78) 

in broadcasting 





{Intimate conversation of a lady ivith herself} 



'T'VE been doing nasty things to my 
palate with bitter concoctions. I've 
been abusing my poor, patient sys- 
tem with harsh, violent purges. The 
whole idea of taking a laxative be- 
came a nightmare. Why didn't I dis- 
cover you before . . . friend Ex-Lax. 
You taste like my favorite chocolate 
candy. You're mild and you're gentle 
. . . you treat me right. Yet with all 
your mildness you're no shirker . . . 
you're as thorough as can be. The 
children won't take anything else . . . 
my husband has switched from his 
old brand of violence to you. You're 
a member of the family now . . ." 

Multiply the lady's thoughts by mil- 
lions . . . and you have an idea of 
public opinion on Ex-Lax. For more 



people use Ex-Lax than any other 
laxative. 46 million boxes were used 
last year in America alone. 10c and 
25c boxes in any drug stcre. Be sure 
to get the genuine! 



MAIL THIS COUPON— TODAY! 
EX-LAX, Inc., P. O. Box r/o 
Times-Plaza Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MM-ioo Please send free sample of Ex-Lax. 

Name _ _ 

Address _ _ _ 



(// yon live in Canada, tcrite Ex-Lax. Ltd., 
736 Notre Dame St. W., Montreal) 



When Nature forgets — 
remember 

EX- LAX 

THE ORIGINAL CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 



Tune in on "Strange as it Seems", new Ex-Lax Radio Program. See local newspaper for station and time. 



13 



RADIO STARS 




Wide World 



Albani believes that rest and relaxation do more for one's appearance 
than do costly treatments. She finds that the atomizer diffuses the 
brilliantine more evenly over the hair. Her powder-box contains several 
different color-blends of powder to suit the occasion or the mood. 



Olga Albani suggests to our beauty 
editor new hints for make-up glamour 



AS I SAT talking 
to tall, slender Olga 
Albani in the beau- 
tiful living-room of 
her friend Sophie 
Breslau's apartment, I was wishing 
that I might paint a word-picture of 
her. Blue is her favorite color. She 
was dressed in blue when I talked 
with her, and she posed for the pic- 
tures that you see on this page in 
the lovely blue and white boudoir 
that is always hers when she visits 
Sophie Breslau, former Metropolitan 
Opera star, with whom she studied 
music. 

When Phil Spitalny gave his con- 
ception of the composite characteris- 
tics that an ideal Miss Radio would 
have, he chose the personal beauty of 
Olga Albani. And he might well 
have chosen her graciousness, her 
cbarm, and her glamour as well. 
Glamour is an overworked word, 
but I can think of none that so su- 
perbly fits this woman who was born 
in a castle overlooking Barcelona, but 
who is as modern in her convictions, 
her ambition, and her energy as any 
young American sportswoman ever 
was. She will never become a buxom, 
austere dowager laden with jewels. 

14 



BicLdh 



Not this youthful 
person who ' swims, 
fences, dances, 
writes, cooks, and is 
an expert horsewo- 
man. Her body has the grace and 
suppleness that afford adequate 
demonstration of the value of a 
trained body where posture and poise 
are concerned. She will always "keep 
young and beautiful." 

Olga Albani qualifies for my concep- 
tion of the adjective "glamourous", 
because she lives with color, verve, 
and assurance ; because she has never 
lost the spur of ambition, the spirit 
of adventure, nor the zest for intel- 
lectual curiosity. The real sophisti- 
cate is never bored. She finds life 
too interesting. Speaking with the 
voice of the beauty editor, I feel that 
we don't give enough importance to 
this mental attitude toward life. 
When you write and ask me how to 
be different, J want to suggesl that 
you not just try a new make-up or a 
new exercise routine, but to develop 
new and different interests and ac- 
tivities. A woman must be interested 
in something before she is interest- 
ing. I sincerely believe that the rea- 
son a great many singers and ac- 




RADIO STARS 



"Wash hand-knits with 
IVORY FLAKES," 

URGE THE MAKERS OF MINERVA YARNS 




tresses keep young and beautiful 
when other women get drab and old 
looking is because they give more 
exercise to their minds than does the 
average woman. Olga Albani's per- 
sonal beauty is not of features alone, 
but of expression. 

She carries over her enthusiasms 
and her interests to her dressing- 
table and wardrobe, too. Since she 
is devoted to blue as a color, her 
wardrobe is a study in blue and 
white. She likes white for evening. 
The blue that she chooses is the pale, 
sophisticated blue that the dark bru- 
nette can wear with more telling 
effect than the blonde who seems to 
have preempted it for her particular 
color. With her olive skin and dark 
hair, either white or pale blue are 
excellent foils. Most of us would 
profit by limiting our wardrobes in 
color, bv finding those shades that 
do the most for us. and that we are 
happiest in. and then building up our 
wardrobes around them. 

Albani loves blue eyeshadow. She 
blends it quite far out on her eyelids 
and thus makes her eyes look even 
wider than they are. For evening 
she finds it exciting to blend her blue 
eyeshadow with silver. It gives her 
a little extra "lift" when she is dress- 
ing for a glamorous evening. When 
she went to Hollywood to make a 
picture, the make-up man taught her 
to line the inner corner of her eyes 
with an eyebrow pencil, very lightly. 
She says it is amazing the illusion of 
greater width it achieves. (Remem- 
ber, on just the inner corner of the 
eyes make a tiny V stroke with your 
black or brown eyebrow pencil.) She 
grooms her eyebrows with an eye- 
brow brush and pencil rather than 
with tweezers. 

There are color tones in music, 
and there are color tones in make-up. 
The Spanish songstress believes in 
getting all the emotional lift out of 
colors that you can. In the center 
illustration you see her using her re- 
volving powder-box. Each section 
has a different color blend of 
powder in it, and she uses the 
powder according to her mood and 
her costume. A sports costume may 
call for a shade of powder with a 
peach-bloom tone in it to emulate 
the golden health tones of the out- 
door skin ; an evening costume may 
call for a whiter powder with a slight 
violet hue. Changing her powder 
amuses her. She believes that one of 
the greatest values of make-up is 
the satisfaction women derive from 
it in their need for change, for 
experimentation . . . for "being dif- 
ferent." 

Next to make-up in the order of 
glamour comes perfume. Olga Al- 
bani's favorite perfume is Gardenia. 
{Continued on page 98) 



1. TAKE MEASUREMENTS or trace out- 
line of sweater on heavy paper. 




2. SQUEEZE LUKEWARM SUDS of pure 
Ivory Flakes through garment Do not rub, 
twist or let stretch. 




3. RINSE 3 TIMES in lukewarm water 
of same temperature. Knead out excess 
moisture in bath towel. 




4. DRY FLAT, easing back (or stretch- 
ing) to original outline. 

WHEN DRY, appearance is improved by 
light pressing under damp cloth. 



Knit one, purl one — when you put a lot 
of time into knitting a sweater you don't 
want it to become little-sister's-size after 
its first washing! Wool is sensitive — it 
shrinks at the mere mention of rubbing, 
hot water or an impure soap! 

So wash your woolens with respectful 
care. And be especially sure to use cool 
suds of Ivory Flakes. Why Ivory Flakes? 
Well, listen to what the makers of 
Minerva yarns say: "We feel that Ivory 
Flakes are safest for fine woolens be- 
cause Ivory is really pure — protects the 
natural oils that keep wool soft and 
springy." 

Read the washing directions on this 
page, follow them carefully — and your 
hand-knits will always stay lovely as new ! 




IVORY FLAKES 



15 



RADIO STARS 



Hew NOT 

to CAAsk 

Radio 

12 y 4jelen 4jovet 






"I'm gonna have an audition now!" 

WE ALL know about the glamorous and 
successful star, with his four-figured weekly 
salary and his place in the glittering spot- 
light. But what about the ten thousand 
failures? What about the waitresses and 
mechanics and telephone operators and office clerks 
who leave home, and often jobs, to buck radio and get 
— where ? 

You'll find many of their stories hard to believe. 

Such as the one about the young man who came to 
Eddie Cantor's office one morning and asked to see 
the button-eyed comedian. When he was told that 
Cantor was out for the day, he looked disappointed, 
and left. 

The incident was forgotten until the end of the 
day, when the secretary went to the window to draw 
the shades. There, perched on the narrow ledge of 



the building a dizzy twenty stories from the ground, his 
back pressed tightly against the wall, stood the young 
man. The secretary yanked him in and demanded : "Why 
did you do it ?" 

Then came his story. He had hitch-hiked from Ohio 
in order to get into radio and he was trusting to the soft- 
hearted Cantor to ease him on to the air. He thought the 
secretary was trying to keep him from seeing his self- 
appointed benefactor, so when he left the office he had 
managed in some ingenious manner to climb out on the 
ledge (these desperate radio crashers don't stop at a 
thing!) and had stayed in that dangerous spot all morning 
and afternoon, crawling over to the window every once 
in a while to peep in and see whether Cantor had come in ! 

Cantor shuddered when he learned of it. "But what 
can I do?" he said. "If I saw everyone who came to me 
I wouldn't have time for my own work. The great pity 
of that stunt was that it wasn't necessary. There are 
regular channels by which you can get auditions, and 
there's no sense in trying to sidetrack them." 

But the over-zealous Ten Thousand don't want to be- 
lieve that. They read that James Melton got his chance 
by singing in the corridor outside of Roxy's door until the 
great showman actually came outside and gave him a job ; 
that Jane Froman sang at a party and was heard by a 
radio executive there ; or that So-and-So got on the air 
by pulling a grand bluff, and they plunge right ahead and 
try to go them one better. So they attend public functions 
and benefits — or crash private ones — and select one prom- 
inent radio star in the midst and immediately make him a 
target for their impromptu audition. I'll never forget 
the time I attended a dinner benefit to which came some 
of the biggest stars in radio. Abe Lyman was sitting 
peacefully at one table with several friends, just minding 
his own business, when three girls suddenly swooped 
down upon him and without warning, launched into a loud 
and rather painful harmony of "Lookic, Lookic, Lookie, 
Here Comes Cookie," right before all the startled guests. 
It would have been funny — if it hadn't been so darned 
pathetic. 

Genuinely heartbreaking is the story of the girl who 



16 



RADIO STARS 



Abe Lyman was amazed when 
three girls began to sing! 



HOWARD WILLIAMSON, CARTOONIST 



You'll find these stories 
hard to believe— but all 
of them actually are true! 




"It was the only way I could see him!" 



appeared every afternoon at the cocktail hour at the 
swanky Ritz-Carlton where Richard Himber and his 
orchestra were playing. She came in alone every day 
and was quite shabbily dressed for such an exclusive 
place. She finally attracted Himber's attention and as 
he passed her table he would smile at her and ex- 
change greetings until one day he felt that he knew 
her well enough to talk to her. That was just what 
she wanted. She told him that she had come to the 
Ritz-Carlton every day just to catch his eye. She 
could sing very well and didn't he want a girl singer 
for his band? As she talked, Dick learned that she 
was a stenographer out of work and that she practi- 
cally went without food the whole day long, using up 
her frugal savings to come to the expensive Ritz- 
Carlton just so that she could get to know Dick! But 
all Dick could do was send her off with some money 
and good advice. 

Another variant is the case of the two little girls, 
about ten and thirteen, who appeared at the audition 
office at Station WOR and announced that they 
wanted an audition. They were bedraggled little 
things and appeared so weak that Ted Fickett, one of 
the audition directors, drew them aside and got their 
story. They came, it appeared, from Florida, and 
their mother had skimped and saved to give them 
singing and elocution lessons. With her last few dol- 
lars she put them on a bus alone and sent them one 
thousand miles to New York. The two children, pen- 
niless and bewildered, had been sleeping in the sub- 
ways and living off the remaining sandwiches in their 
lunch kit. Fickett got in touch with the Travelers' 
Aid Society, who sent the children safely back home, 
and then he wrote a stern letter to the mother. He 
thought that had ended it, but several months later 
the mother wrote that now her children had improved 
a great deal and she was going to send them on the 
bus to New York again. It was necessary for him to 
get in touch with the Florida authorities and prevent 
her from subjecting those two little girls again to 
such a cruel experience. (Continued on page 94) 



RADIO STARS 







ntllB COOBEUt 

■ ■ — f^m-me-to-vou show 



4 u the gay ^rom-me-io-you 
second « the g * dcast . 



to* 



i fire**** *°* 
tor *° 



era 
mos* "° 



ot *«*° 



,ro<3' 



off 1 




AW 



one 



u a»ence 
^rner»c° » , oU fe*edty 

SpeoVs deoree «* " 



• A cWo^ *PP°* ? « D r VH ****** 

y^ttiamOoW.^ _ Tfee Voice 



sinqer* 
ches*a\ 



^er 



stone * 




VAar9<» r€ 




Ccum^aI in 
Cxynfehence. 



Yessir, it's littrocbure! 
Budd has a book. True, 
the Colonel's home work 
looks like a road mop — 
but he'll get the right 
answers! Teacher Fred 
Waring dons spectacles 
and a thoughtful mien. 
And don't think that is 
easy, either, what with 
Rosemary and Priscilla 
Lane and Stella Friend 
hovering sweetly dosel 
But he will concentrate 
on the tome on his knees. 
Yes, the Pennsylvanians 
must be in the knowl 



Hat fanies — 

Lot JUfrWlXHC^ 

On the opposite page, 
George Burns reports, 
Frances Longford cons 
it over, Gracie Allen 
meditates thoughtfully 
while orchestra leader 
Raymond Paige, of the 
Hollywood Hotel pro- 
gram, ponders porten- 
tously — at 'a National 
Amateur Hour. The four 
are sifting in judgment 
on some unseen but am- 
bitious amateurs who 
have just given of their 
best and fondly hope for 
a break. Well, maybe 
the break will be made 
by gorgeous Gracie. 



22 



Seoul SUvty of 



m 




Phillips Lord 
is back on the 
air — both as 
popular Seth 
Parker and as 
director and 
author of 
"G-Maru" 



Real man and shadow man— 

FOR two years, people have been asking the reason for 
Phil Lord's dogged determination to sail away on a worn- 
out ship. 

They have wondered at the ugly rumors that followed 
the Seth Parker down the eastern seaboard like a wake, 
and at the publicity scandal that succeeded its wreck in 
mid-Pacific. 

Now they are wondering because, though the press 
screamed this winter that Phil Lord . was through, he's 
back ! Though it shouted that no one could bulldoze the 
public the way he had tried to and get away with it, Phil 
is in again — as Seth Parker and as the narrator and 
author of a smashing "G-man" script ! 

What, they ask, is the truth about him? What were 
the real reasons for his departure and comeback? Does 
anyone know ? 

These, for the first time, are the facts. 

Get this picture of Phil Lord. It's important. 

He is a young man who, six years ago, invented a 
radio character he called Seth Parker. Had the character 
been a baseball player, or a story-teller, Phil might have 
remained a smart, tremendously ambitious actor-writer, 
likeable and striving for all the money he could get. But 
as millions found a new Messiah. in Seth Parker and began 
to pause each Sunday evening to sing — and pray — with 
him, Seth started putting upon his creator a mantle of 
godliness that was — frankly, a heavy burden. 

Now to that picture of the man, put this series of can- 
did pictures. It's an unknown incident in Phil's life and 
one that shows better than words how much greater than 
Phil Lord Seth Parker had become. 

One Sunday evening, just before Phil started on his 
voyage, he and his wife were working in one of the NBC 
studios. They were about to go on the air when a page 
boy entered and drew Phil to one side. 

Lovely Mrs. Phillips Lord, whose maternal solicitude 
inadvertently puzzled both press and public 



Phil Lord and Seth Parker— and a strange dilemma! 



"Mr. Lord," he said, "there's a call from Brooklyn. A 
girl. Her mother is dying and she's asking for you." 

During the program, and during the dash through the 
crowded streets that followed it, Phil was quiet, con- 
strained, as though he faced some special ordeal. 

In the quiet side street before the little house, he 
paused a minute to compose himself ; then he and his 
wife went on in. 

They were too late. The white-haired old lady was 
still and her face was relaxed and quiet. 

Phil looked at the radio at the side of the l)ed. He 
knew it had been turned on only a short 
time before for Seth Parker. He looked 
from it to the peacefulness of the dead 
face. Then he came away. 

When he returned to the studios, he 
said something that we who heard it will 
never forgef. He said: "I'm glad she 
didn't see me. She was happier in that she didn't." 

Later I asked him what he had meant. He explained : 
"She thought until the last she would find in me every- 
thing she had heard over the air. She wouldn't have 
gone so happily had she known what a little man I am 
j beside Seth Parker." 

Do you begin to see ? Why, the insistence of Phil Lord 
upon his voyage was nothing beside the insistence with 
which Seth Parker dinned his superiority in Phil's ears 
and governed his life. 

Have you ever spent any time with anyone who ex- 
celled you in all the virtues ? Who wouldn't let you smoke 
because he didn't smoke, nor drink because he didn't, nor 
drive a hard bargain because it was against his policy? 
Seth Parker placed all those restrictions on Phil's life. 

But we must continue to examine with cold precision 
the reasons for Phil's departure and the strange chain 



Stuaht 



of circumstances that presently caused his humiliation 
To go on . . . all that above happened some three 
months before Phil sailed away . . . and was one of the 
reasons. The others ? 

Phil was working too hard. He became intolerant in 
rehearsals; and his intolerance, so different from the 
kindliness of Seth Parker, became increasingly apparent 
in raging outbursts that set studio tongues to wagging 
like metronomes. Few, however, knew that after his 
almost apoplectic blow-ups, he would work all night re- 
writing a script to inject into it some of the faith he 
didn't have in himself. His wife would 
awaken early in the morning and go to his 
study. He would be there, his head sunk 
in his hands ; and she would lead him off 
to bed like a child. 

Three weeks after his visit to Brooklyn, 
he lost more than one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars in a minor market sag, the greater part 
of his savings. I think that has been reported before, but 
only his closest friends know that, following this disaster, 
his secretary one morning walked into his office and 
found him lying unconscious on the floor. 

He was all right, of course — as all right as a man can 
be whose heart had chosen this way of demanding a rest. 
The doctor who was called knew him and the ambition 
that drove him. 

"He said, "You won't rest, though you should. So 
you must have variety. Do a little playing for a change." 

Lord's attempt to follow these instructions resulted in 
further public comparisons of his character with that of 
Seth Parker. It was sarcastically pointed out that the 
Maine hymn-singer would not go dining and dancing in 
the smarter New York night clubs. 

So again Phil was stopped in {Continued on page 68) 



Phillips Lord, with Captain Fink (right), aboard 
Lord's ill-fated schooner, the Seth Parker. 



Admiral Yates Sterling, USN, (left) presents 
Phillips Lord with his lieutenant's commission. 





RADIO STARS 




Photo by Maurice Seymour 



(Above) She was Mar- 
jorie Louise McClure 
till Jimmy saw her. Then 
he promptly persuaded 
her to become Mrs. 
James Melton. And can 
you blame him for it? 
(Upper Right) Friends 
wait to greet Jimmy 
after a broadcast. 



J 



THERE'S been a lot of fiction 
written about Southern boys. 
You know the type — handsome, 
soft-spoken,- easy-going, slow of 
speech and action. What we mean to 
say (in a nice way, of course) is "lazy". The 
climate below the Mason and Dixon Line is sup- 
posed to encourage this sort of thing. 

In fiction Southern boys always stay that way. 
Even when they get to be bond salesmen in Toronto, 
they still have all the earmarks. But the fact is . . . 
well, take Jimmy Melton, who isn't hard to take, either 
vocally or visually, as you know. Tall, dark and hand- 
some, he has all the physical attributes of your favorite 
cotton cavalier. But there the parallel ends. Product 
of a deep South sawmill town and three of the most 
Southern of Southern colleges, he has a right to be the 
typical Southerner. Instead, he's a go-getter, a fighter — 
a dynamo of energy. 

You'll never hear him say: "Pardon my Southern 
accent." Not that he hasn't one — but he doesn't throw 
26 



it at you. He hasn't 
time to drawl. His prob- 
lem is to find enough work to 
keep his active mind and young 
body busy. The result is that he has 
long since passed the mark most people 
expect to reach when they are much older. 
Jimmy is thirty-one, and doesn't look it; he 
could "have fun" for a long time on the money 
he has made and the laurels he has won. 
But that wouldn't be fun for him. "If you gave me 
a million dollars, I'd take a two- weeks' boat trip and then 
go right back to work," he says. Work is what he likes. 
Action is the breath of life for him. 

It's always been that way, ever since his birth in a 
tiny house on the outskirts of Moultrie, Georgia. His 
family were real Southerners, and even Georgia was 
too far North for them. As soon as Jimmy was old 
enough to wear his first pair of pants they pulled stakes 
and started toward Florida. 

Here, in a rambling old house surrounded by droop- 



RADIO STARS 





Nautical and niftyl Jimmy's yacht 
"Melody" makes ready for a week-end 
cruise, with guests aboard. Jimmy is 
star of "Ward's Family Theatre". 



"You can't have everything," declares James Melton. 
But— reading the story of his career, one wonders . . . 



ing trees and draped with honeysuckle vines* they made 
their home. Money wasn't plentiful, so young James 
went barefoot most of the time. He dug cypress roots 
out of the swamps, which sold for a cent a-piece, if they 
were long enough and unbroken; he repaired coaster 
wagons and roller skates, for spending money. He didn't 
have time to envy the boy next door who had a shiny 
new red bike sent down from Sears Roebudc Jimmy 
went out and earned one for himself just like it. 

"That," he says, "was every poor boy's life down there. 
And it was mine. I've never had an easy job." 

Nor can he remember when he didn't have to work. 
His first steady salary came at the ripe old age of nine, 
when he donned one of his brother's "cut-down" suits 
to get a job in the little country grocery store. He was 
paid forty cents a day. His duties weren't much, he 
says. "I had to clean all the lamp chimneys with news- 
papers, every day, because there were no electric lights 
in Citra then. It was a country town, where Main 
Street ran knee-deep with mud after every rain. . . . 
I cleaned beneath the spigots of the molasses barrels 



and kerosene drums, too — and after deliveries were 
finished I swept the emporium." 

This -lasted a year, until Jimmy was offered a better 
job, at a ten-cent salary increase — loading watermelons 
all day under the hot sun. Jimmy wasn't so husky in 
those days. That's hard to believe when you look at 
him today. But he was what they used to call a "puny" 
child — though he never realized it himself. 

"When we got hot and tired we could always acci- 
dentally drop one of the very biggest melons and sink 
into it up to our ears," he recollects, grinning. "But 
watermelons weren't in season all year 'round, so that 
job didn't last long." 

Neither did his idleness. It was all right for him to 
be standing behind the altar as soloist m the Citra 
church, holding a book that was almost as big as he 
was. But that was only Sundays, and singing wasn't 
work, anyway. So his father used him the rest of the 
week pulling a cross-cut saw in his sawmilL It was the 
hardest work Jimmy had ever done, yet there was 
no balking from the pale (Continued on page X3) 

27 



. . 7 Cove* ike 




NOT IN THE SCRIPT: Some lines not heard on the air. 

That minute before the program goes on 
the air! What happens? What would you 
hear if the microphone were to be turned on? 
. . . I've jotted down some of the things said 
just before the engineer held up his hand for 
silence in some of the studios. Here they are : 

"Paul Whiteman's Music Hall" 
Paul — Okay, lads. Last chance to clear your throats. 
(Blast of throat clearing, followed by a rhythmic 
squeaking. ) 

Johnny Hauser — Hey, Lou. Your shoes squeak. 
Lou Holts — Yes, my boy. But my jokes don't, 

"Easy Aces" 

(The accordionist is running through the theme, which 
is "Manhattan Melodrama.") 

Goodman Ace — Hey, why do you play it so full ? 

Accordionist — I always play it full. 

Jane Ace (she talks just as she does on the air) — 
Sure, honey ; let him give it all he's got, . . . We'll prob- 
ably hear it all the rest of our lives. 

Accordionist — It's your fault. You picked it. 

Jane — Lucky I did. It's the only thing about the pro- 
gram I'm not tired of. 

"Lucky Smith" 
Peg LaCcntra — I was thinking — and I still think — it 




Bert Lawson 

Virginia Verrill keeps fit by this practical exercise. 



fossil at a tyUuae 



Birthday Height Weight 



Hair 



Feb. 14 (S'lOVi"! 167 Grayish 
Jack Benny 

The Bennys have rented Lita Gray Chaplin's home 
in Hollywood — and does it startle them I The other 
day Jack pushed a button to turn on the lights 
and got an organ recital instead. 




Birthday Height Weight 



Hair 



Just 24 



5' 3" 



119 



Golden Brown 



Kathleen Wells 

A few months ago, Kathleen was all ready to leave 
New York. She wanted to forget a busted ro- 
mance. But then a nice singing break came along 
and Kathleen decided that broken hearts were 
best forgotten. The real name is McClone. 




June 14 



5' 9' 



170 



Sandy 



Major Bowes 

The Major is making a movie short, and it's a fact 
that the professionals who are extras in the picture 
are reported to be getting less money than the 
amateurs do for appearing on his radio hour) 




Jan. 16 



5' 6' 



118 



Brown 



Ethel Merman 

She has her own ideas about style. In New York, 
she wears nothing but town clothes; but in Holly- 
wood, she wears nothing but sport clothes. It shows 
the difference, she thinks. Her name's Zimmerman. 




Nov. 28 



6" 0" 



155 



Whitish 



Frank Black 

His hair is whiteish, all right, but it's turning back 
to iron gray. Why? Because Frank, an avid 
amateur 'chemist, blew himself up a couple of 
months ago with a mixture that turned his locks 
silvery. They are growing back in darker. 




Sept. 10 



5' 5" 



120 



Auburn 



Cobina Wright 

At a party, the other night, Cobina was lookinq 
for a thrill — so she smoked a cigar clear to here! 
She's doing well, thank you. 




Sept. 26 



6' 0" 



205 



Crisp Brown 



Frank Crumit 

Frank and his wife are buying, after a number of 
years in the big city, a little home in his native 
town — Jackson, Ohio. They've been radio stars 
since the days of crystal sets. 




Apr. 28 



6' 0 



189 I 



Gray 



Lionel Barrymore 
The old burper has been signed by Dick Powell's 
Hollywood Hotel to do Scrooge in Dickens' 
"Chr.stmas Carol" every Christmas Day for the 
next five years. It's a record. 



If vou would be in the know ohont vonr fovorite stars 



Stu d i o s ^ 




William Haussler 

Mary Lou loves to stencil when not singing with Lanny. 



would be better to talk more loudly, away from the mike. 
You know, I'm in the back seat of the car. 

Max Boer — Anything goes, Pally. 

Director— Well, let it ride. Everybody ready? 

Max (close to the mike) — All ah wants is one mo' 
chance, peepul. Ah'll bring home that title sho'. . . . 
And, boy, will I ! . . . 

"Let's Dance" 

Kay Thompson — Golly! If people talked the way 
those lyrics go. . . . Whoops! 

Lennie Hayton — Gimmie my stick. . . . Hey, where's 
my stick. . . . Ops, sorry. . . . (Heh, heh! It was right 
in front of him.) 

"Death Valley Days" 

Director— Instead of taking that alone, we'll have the 
orchestra for a background. 

Ruth Witmer — Thanks. I felt lonely in there. After 
all, I'm kidding myself that I'm an actress and not a 
singer. 

Director — Let's make it the public, too. Set? 

"Lazy Dan, the Minstrel Man" 
Irving Kaufman (Lazy Dan) — Say, did I tell you fel- 
lows about . . . 

Orchestra — Yes ! ! ! ! 

Kaufman — Sorry. Let it pass. 

(Continued on page 64) 




Birthday Height Weight 



Hair 



Nov. 4 j S' II" | 180 | Gray 

Will Roger* 

He's reputedly the only radio star who it now 
allowed to ad lib lines over the air. Jolson did, 
too, until a remark about a hotel almost brought 
a damage suit down on his sponsors. 




Birthday Height Weight 



Hair 



May 23 5' I" | 139 | Light Brown 



. Arthur Tracy 

When the Street Singer went over to England, his 
wife started suit for separation here. Apparently 
England wasn't far enough awayl 




June 16 | 5' 10 " | 



141 



Brown 



Tom Howard 

Tom now greets newcomers to Rudy Vallee's star- 
studded show with a sympathetic query. He asks, 
"Hey. Pal. Whot you in for?" 





June 19 



145 



Dark Brown 



Guy Lombardo 

The Royal Canadian has just become a hero.' He 
used his $10,000 motor launch to rescue four per- 
sons from a watery grave. 



Nov. 3 



0' 



187 



Chestnut 



Nov. 27 




Tod Pearson 

This announcer is looking for a new namel You 
see, he's going to become a baritone and poetry 
reciter soon — and he doesn't think the name he 
has fits. What do you think? 

Apr. 29 | 5' 10 " | 155 | Black 

Frank Parker 

Oat in Hollywood, Frank started the style of wear- 
ing a white dinner jacket with a black dress shirt. 
It went great— until Mary Livingston greeted him 
with: "Hey. Parkerl Your shirt's dirty?" 



6- 0" | 



168 



What hair? 



Edward (Ted) Hating 

Loquacious Ted has been revealed as the culprit 
who steals full length pictures of Jean Harlow 
from the movie palaces. He has probably married 
Ann St. George by now. 




Nov. 10 



5" 5" 



120 



Dark Brown 



Jane Froman 

Best news of the month is that Jane has lost her 
stutter. She did it by being shut in a room and not 
uttering a word for five days. On the sixth, she was 
introduced to a number of people who had been 
cured — and talked her head off, without a stut. 



just glance at these candid columns of useful facts 



J ^ . B „W VO»« 6 '« 5 - ;3 , r -f, 

• «Ae \ooU » l t rs ana > Ca»"°? a progra" 1 . the \ a st x n \\ov^ng- 

^veevc to c : t \\asa« . , vn a Tattana* 5 



Wide World 



Melody e'* tt „g, *a. > J ^ MM 

they g°< toK its roots * be ^ers 

To begi« : n ^ter-\eai cig < ^ a ur ftrst 
certain cc c many c product- 

\tfhat »S a ^ bvw preset nC a, 

a « oococ""" P**« wtet has 

5 ucc^ eAs | 



3 
> 



t^ *° tbe V»t-ttt« ocean . 
< ( anc\ ocean 
to ^^d' 

c \o * e , . tVie v are- « 

^°tSv W^^ir^ <on- 

nobody ° Rotofoto*. tuc. 





Once Mrs. Ted Husing, the charming lady 
above now is Mrs. Lennie Hayton, wife 
of the conductor of the Hit Parade. 



And this is Johnnie Hauser in action! 
You have heard and enjoyed his voice 
on many a Saturday night program. 



.^it Parade" 

(or 1-56 ^ ^ 

..hat 5^ et hh records of* sr ftg „ on 

• me how a rtS^tig, too, kn0 v,n 
Ama fi l isn't f ^ experts ^ h . . . 
you spi* beiore. 1 £ven \ast m 
has been don year Md 

never « ftt tt i« rAa* and J* 

a ^aCsting and t**^ vvouW ^ thlS pV o 
t^g .^ur d ^ e tact that ^ |, ^ 

teeptng »« w ost P^SLgc yoU «tofl»» wbo 
g'aVn to ^ ^ J* to ^fSisWr-^er ?t 
fe perhaps a0 wner an° ■ dlQ . tare ^ e 
iortabk ^Vorry here * a .^ n o^ 

^ et Kfi ^ Huey ^ S he'sat ^hey ^ 

to turn ott 1 ponsette— sn ^ -frhbett. * bave 

or B,ng OT arai>t« d . a °i e past. T ,L„, to *e 

bo^^ r p-^ fo9£ 




Walter Seieal 




Kay Thompson is considered to be "one 
of the best bets on the air". She made 
her radio debut while still in school. 



Winning a priie in a national radio 
contest brought Charles Carlile to be 
the Hit Parade's popular young tenor. 



CRAZY CAPTION 




Do you want to win 
a prize? Try this 
dandy new contest! 



F 



H I 

r 



PRIZES 



lit Prhe 
$250.00 cash 



3rd Prize 
A $75.00 radio 



2nd Prize 
$100.00 cash 

4th Prize 
A dressing-table radio 



5th Prize 

Ten Mai Factor MAKE-UP KITS to the ten nezt best 

answers. 

6th Prize 

100 $1.00 bills to the one hundred nezt best answers. 
7th Prize 

SO Maz Factor Lipsticks to the 50 nezt best answers. 
8th Prize 

50 Decca-Bing Crosby Phonograph Records to the 50 nezt 
best answers. 

9th Prize 

100 sheets of "Big Broadcast of 1936" music to the nezt 
best 100 answers. 



RULES 

1. Contest it open to anyone living in United States 
or Canada with .exception of employees of RADIO 
STARS Magazine and Paramount Pictures, Inc. 

2. Contestants must submit two sets of Crazy Cap- 
tions and Pictures, one set to be printed in Octo- 
ber issue and one in November issue of RADIO 
STARS Magazine. 

3. Contestants must correctly identify captions with 
personalities as presented in "The Big Broadcast 
of 1936." 

4. In fifty words or less, tell which radio star's per- 
formance in the "Big Broadcast of 1936" you en- 
joyed most and why. 

5. Your letters and both sets of captions and photo- 
graphs or facsimiles thereof must be mailed to 
Crazy Captions Contest, RADIO STARS Magazine, 
149 Madison Ave., N. Y. C, in one envelope or 
package, before November 1st, 1935. 

6. Prizes will be awarded to those contestants who 
most correctly connect the crazy captions with 
the photographs or facsimiles thereof of the radio 
personalities appearing in the motion picture, "Big 
Broadcast of 1936," and who tell most clearly and 
interestingly in fifty words or less which radio 
star's performance they enjoyed in the "Big Broad- 
cast of 1936" and why. 

7. Judges shall be the editors of RADIO STARS 
Magazine. 

8. In case of ties, each contestant will be awarded 
the prize tied for. 

9. Contest shall close the last day of October, 1935. 



32 





Ethel Merman 



RAZY Caption Contest is the easiest job of the month. 
Cv Of the year. Of the Age ! If you don't get in on it 
. . . well, this heat just has gotcha ! 
Do it like this, for instance : 

Look at the four pictures of radio and movie stars spread 
along the top of this page. They all appeared in the great 
picture, Paramount's "Big Broadcast of 1936." They all sang 
songs and spoke lines that you and you and that little fellow 
in the corner heard. Now look at the captions printed in the 
white balloons that come out of their mouths. They are saying 
things in those balloons . . . and it's your job to see if they are 
saying the right things. 

Just between the half million of us, they're all saying the 
wrong things; they're all saying lines or words of songs that 
somebody else used in "The Big Broadcast." The captions are 
topsy-turvy. That's why we call this a Crazy Caption contest. 

Now, if you've a hunch that Bing Crosby didn't sing the 
words our clumsy artist put in his mouth, or that George Burns 
never mouthed : "Your caress possesses the kick of a kangaroo," 
just get to work with shears and paste or pen and ink, and put 
the right words in the right mouths. 

Simple, isn't it? See "The Big Broadcast of 1936" or ask 
someone who has seen it. The rest is easy. That's the first 
half of your job. The second is this : 

In fifty words or less, write a paragraph stating which radio 
star's performance you enjoyed most in "The Big Broadcast 
of 1936." And why you enjoyed it. Write as interestingly as 
you know how. 

Next, get the second set of radio star photographs and crazy 
captions to be published in the November issue of Radio Stars 
(on sale October 1st) and hook those captions up with the right 
people, just as you're doing this month. Mail your two sets 
of photos with the captions all placed and your fifty-word para- 
graph to this address : 



A 
1 




319 swell prizes! 
9 simple rules. You 
can't help winning! 



CRAZY CAPTION CONTEST 
Radio Stars Magazine, 149 Madison Ave., New York 

There are 319 prizes, cash and make-up kits and 
radio and music galore. Say, you'll have to try hard 
not to win one of these grand rewards. 

Maybe it's money you want . . . we've got $500 in 
cash for the smarties who think fast and straight. Or 
how would you like a great big grand Max Factor 
make-up kit with everything in it from puff to paint ? 
Or a Decca recording of Bing Crosby's marvellous 
voice singing his favorite song ? 

The contest is easy to enter and easy to win. Re- 
member, it runs for two months — October and No- 
vember issues of Radio Stars — you've got plenty of 
time to get all the information you need. 



33 




55 




BROADCASTING 



Acme Newspictures 




Ted Husing brings the mike to Eleanor Holm. 

IF 1 may. 1 would like to stand the hour- 
glass upside down. 

We are on our way up Broadway. It is 
night, and Al Jolson's name is scrawled 
across the sky in letters that are taller than a 
six-foot man. There's a guy named Frisco in The Fol- 
lies. He's a wise guy, dancing the town crazy with his 
grotesque rhythm. There's a girl in town, and her 
name's Ann Pennington. There's a fool in burlesque. 
His name is Bert Lahr. Alice Brady is the number-one 
dream-girl of the critics. Pearl White approaches th< 
end of her pursuit after a cowled killer who always turns 
out to he someone she didn't even suspect. 



. His Own 



Why is Ted Husing so 
Here is the answer 



We hurry through Harlem, and now 
we are outside of a dance-hall in The 
Bronx. It is the night of a dance con- 
test. There is a guy by the name of 
Georgie Raft, a dark and dismally deb- 
onair fellow with patent leather hair. He 
stands in the doorway, idle and suspicious, 
and watches as two couples flash by in the 
hoppy rites of the Charleston. 

The judge banishes one couple from 
the floor. The winners dance alone. 

They move jerkily with an angry quick- 
ness. They are grim, and they seem un- 
happy in their moment of glory. The 
crowd applauds. But they stay aloof from 
the cheers. Conquerors must be stern. 
They dance as though they were crazy slaves of the 
orchestra. Their fun has ceased to be fun. It's a badge 
of superiority, it's a tin crown, tarnished, lop-sided. 

They walk up and get their cup. They go home in the 
subway. Their dreams came true in rhe heat and glare 
of the dance-hall. They wear their victory like a medal. 
The girl was Helen Gifford 
The boy was Ted Husing 
They were man-it < 

Now they are divorced. 

* * * 

It might help you to understand Ted Husing. who is 
always misunderstood, this blurred typewriter mural of 



Site fyot what Jim wanted 



FRANCIA WHITE says she 
has no business being on radio. 
It wasn't at all what she started 
out to be — but now, look at her ! 
Star of "Music at the Haydn's" 
and most of the "Palmolive Oper- 
ettas." So she's turned into a 
downright, out-and-out fatalist. 

By all the laws of circum- 
stances, she should have been a 
movie star. Lived near Holly- 
wood, had a figure like a cigarette 
ad model and a thrilling soprano 
which was already making the 
White name a pretty famous one 
in the California local operas 

So what? So naturally with all 
of these attributes, Francia came 
to the attention of the movie 
moguls. They took one look at 



her, heard that voice and saw be- 
fore them the newest menace to 
Grace Moore. But first the for- 
malities of a movie test. 

Francia took one look at the 
finished test — and ran from the 
projection room weeping. It 
seems that she had broken her 
nose.- as a child, and while it's not 
noticeable in person, it was exag- 
gerated in the films. 

Plop went the movie star ambi- 
tions. But a girl has to eat, so she 
gulped hack the disappointment 
and hung around the studios doing 
bit roles and voice doubling for 
the stars. 

But what did we say about 
Fate? Some force was slowly 
but decidedly steering Francia on 




Ray l.e* Jackson 

Francia White 

a different course. Anyway, with 
the filming of "The Might v Bar- 
num" {Continued on page 81) 



34 



l/to*st 

often misunderstood? 

a young man who danced morosely in a 
Bronx dance-hall. 

His dance of life is as mechanical and 
without humor. He courts applause, hut 
ignores it. He thinks he is a king, but 
frantically conceals his sceptre in a jester's 
bladder. 

He is a little man with a big talent. The 
boy who was the best dancer in the Bronx 
auditorium today is the tops of his trade 
of radio announcing. 

He has made more enemies than any 
other man in radio. But his worst enemy 
is himself. 

I didn't speak to Husing for a year. I 
hated him more than any other man on the 
kilocycles. I am very fond of him now. He is a bore 
and a pompous wind-bag in a crowd. Sitting alone, he 
is a tender and sympathetic friend and a great com- 
panion. He is contemptuous of the throng, but seeks to 
wear its cheers like a garland to prove he is a great man. 

Ted was a frequently unemployed furniture salesman 
until he answered an advertisement and became IVHN'S 
star announcer. The way was slow for a while, but soon 
he was the zippiest talker in his big league. 

He is made to order for his racket. There is no one 
who can talk faster, describe more clearly, interpret action 
the way he does. It is as if he thought aloud. There 
does not seem to be any pause in the passage of thought 




Joseph Melvin McK1Ik.ii 

Ted is often seen with Anne St. George. 

from his brain to his tongue. I have sat with him in 
press boxes all around the country. I have studied him. 
He hasn't time to think what he is saying, he says it so 
quickly. The words are on his tongue — and off they come. 

One night in Boston Ted was master of ceremonies. I 
might add he is not a good act introducer. He knows it. 
He boasts he isn't. But you can't keep him off a night- 
club floor. There was a radio editor sitting at a ring- 
side table. The newspaperman spoke loudly. Husing 
wheeled on him in his windy, forked-tongued anger. 

"Keep still, bum," he said. "Just because you're in 
here on the cuff is no reason why you should holler." 

They fought. Husing won. (Continued on page 60) 



Me 6jouA *k&" Tu&£ lUce that 




Wendell Hall 

WENDELL HALL is probably 
the first radio artist ever to dare 
to thumb his nose at his sponsor. 



What with the depression and 
everything, that's enough to make 
anyone's eyebrows shoot up. This 
momentous event occurred in June 
when he said fare-thee-well, ta-ta 
and toodle-oo to that hair tonic 
company after having been the 
star on their program for almost 
three years. 

Why? Well, to begin with. 
Wendell is a rebel through and 
through. You can tell that by his 
paprika-colored hair, the under- 
slung jaw and the energetic move- 
ments of his long, gaunt body. 
But more than that, Wendell 
knows his radio, and to him that 
break was a case of darned shrewd 
showmanship. 

In order for you to understand 



this Hall person and realize that 
he's not just talking through his 
Stetson when he gives his strange 
reasons for throwing up a per- 
fectly good commercial, get a 
peep at his background. 

He's just a natural-born pioneer. 
Must have taken after his great- 
great -so -on -and -so -forth grand- 
pappy, who was a feller by the 
name of Daniel Boone. Anyway, 
when this newfangled thing called 
the wireless came along, Wendell 
did a bit of trail-blazing on the 
air with his uke. That was back 
in 1921, and with just an occa- 
sional interruption now and then, 
he's been on the air ever since. 
Blame him for that infectious 
ditty, ( Continued on page 97) 



35 



A 



OVER Charlie Win- 
ninger's impish white 
head is raging one of 
the bitterest wars in 
radio. It all started 
when Charlie left the 
helm of "Captain Henry's Show- 
boat" and floundered about in 
stormy seas until he was picked up 
by another sponsor. Charlie and 
his new sponsor got into a secret 
huddle and emerged with their 
new program idea. 

Well, you could have knocked 
over the whole "Showboat" com- 
pany with one 
of their calli- 
opes when 
they learned 
just what the 
new program 
was. "Uncle 
Charlie's Tent 
Show!" Get 
it ? "Captain 
Henry's 
Showboat." 
And the cast ! 
Take a look : 
Conrad Thi- 
bault and Lois 
Bennett as 
the lovers, 
two" colored 
comedians, 
Ernest Whit- 
man and Ed- 
die Green, 
and all 
headed, of 
course, by the 
amiable Uncle 
Charlie. On 
"Showboat," 
Lanny Ross 
and Mary 
Lou are 
swe ethearts, 
Pick and Pat 
the colored 
c o m edians, 
and all 
headed, of 
course, by the 
equally amiable 
Compare Uncle 
line, 
just 



OUTetU 




Ray Lee Jackson 

Charles Winninger, amiable 
Uncle Charlie of the Tent Show. 



Captain Henry. 
Charlie's catch- 
I'm just a-warmin' up, folks, 
a-warmin' up," with Cap'n 
Henry's "This is only the begin- 
nin', o-nly the-e beeginnin'," 
Whew ! Were the Showboat people 
sore? "Copycat!" they cried, and 
the meanies pointed an accusing 
finger at good old Charlie Win- 
ninger. 

But to all of this, he turned his 
beaming, cherubic face. 

"Why, as a child I've travelled 
around in a tent show, and always 
in the back of my head was the 
idea of creating my own tent show 
for radio," he said. "When this 
chance came, I just grabbed it. It's 

36 



my own idea, no matter what any- 
body says." 

So there we are. 

But are we ? What are a person's 
property rights on the air? Can 
anybody come along and copy 
something almost exactly and get 
away with it? To date, there is 
no answer but a lot of people are 
saying goodnatured Charlie violated 
one of Broadway's unwritten laws. 

Of course, the Winninger back- 
ground does bear out his claims. 
He was six when he toured the 
middle West with Mom and Pop 
W i n n i nger 
and brothers 
and sisters in 
a tent show 
called the 
"Winninger 
Family 
T ra veiling 
Theatre — al- 
ways a show 
of quality." 
It was in the 
old days of 
barnstorming. 

For a time 
he did leave 
"The Win- 
ninger Fam- 
ily Theatre" 
for a shot at 
the old "Cot- 
ton Blossom" 
showboat 
troup but he 
left it — just 
as he left 
"Showboat " 
some thirty- 
odd years 
later — to re- 
turn to his 
first love, the 
tent show. 

After 
trouping 
about with 
the family 
some more, 
he got the 
itch to try New York and there he 
found fame and success on Broad- 
way in such shows as "No, No, 
Nanette," and the immortal "Zieg- 
feld Showboat," and he found a 
wife and happiness in the person of 
vivacious Blanche Ring, the singing 
star and toast of New York. 

Winninger went from tent show to 
show boat to Broadway. Then, with 
his career firmly planted on that 
pinnacle he went exactly back- 
wards, from Broadway to "Show- 
boat" to "Tent Show." "Just re- 
verting to type," he explains with 
his famous chuckle. 

And that's the answer Cap'n 
Hen — er — I mean, Uncle Charlie 
flings in the teeth of his critics. 



SouiuJi 



ty&tkdto 




Ray l.ee Jackson 

Here is Helen Claire herself — 
the Southern belle on Broadway. 

Helen Claire, star 
plays a dual role 



YOU know her as Betty 
Graham of "Roses and 
1 )rnms." 

Betty is a lovely 
young Secret Service 
agent, working in the 
sector Ix-tween the Confederate apd 
the Union forces during the |>eriod 
of the Civil War. and the drama of 
the conflict between the North and 
the South is echoed in the drama 
of romance between Hetty Graham 
and Captain Randy Claymore of 
the Confederate Army and Captain 
Gordon Wright of the Union 
forces. Both of these young sol- 
diers arc graduates of the Virginia 
Institute, and Urth arc deeply in 
love with Betty. 

To you, listening to the weekly 
progress of this radio drama, Betty 
Graham is a real i>crson. A charm- 
ing little lady of the old South, 



K 



eile oh 





Ray Lee Jackson 

And here she is in her role of 
Betty Graham of Roses and Drums. 

of Rosesand Drums 
Here is her story 



with all the gracious loveliness 
those words suggest, in a situa- 
tion far removed from the nat- 
ural background of such a girl. 
Vet. despite the stirring scenes in 
which she figures, she remains es- 
sentially true to type, the South- 
ern belle, the glamorous darling of 
inherited chivalry and romance. 

You love this Betty Graham — 
and you hesitate, perhaps, to know 
the real girl Irehind the voice you 
hear over the radio, lest it shatter 
the glamorous image she has created 
in your heart. 

But, rest assured, you won't be 
disappointed when you meet Helen 
Claire — who is Hetty Graham. 

Helen Claire, like Betty, is a 
<laughter of the .old South, with 
that heritage of charm which 
reaches hack through generations 
of South- (Continued on page 79) 



Attest _ 



"HOW do you do it?" 
women all over the world 
ask of Irene Rich. They 
■ mean how does the 

5 amazing Miss Rich, a 

woman in her forties, the 
mother of two marriageable daugh- 
ters, a hard-working radio and 
screen actress, manage to keep that 
Ziegfeld figger and that boarding 
school giggle. At the time of life 
when most women are convenient] v 
put on the shelf, Irene Rich can 
still steal the boy friend from under 
any woman's 
nose without 
half trying. 

"Don't be 
age - consci- 
ous," she ad- 
vises. "Plunge 
yourself into 
a round of 
activities, sur- 
round your- 
self by friends 
and forget 
your birth- 
date." It's a 
prescription 
that Dr. Irene 
herself takes. 

She adores 
people and 
her genuine 
enthusiasm 
for them 
gives her the 
dash and vig- 
o r which 
make her a 
popular play- 
mate, and the 
culture and 
poise which 
make her one 
of the most 
sought - after 
dinner part- 
ners in New 
York City. 

She's ut- 
terly miser- 
able at least, so we're told by her 
loyal secretary, if on entering her 
modern New York apartment, 
there aren't a half-dozen telegrams 
and messages waiting for her and 
a flock of friends already shaking 
i\p cocktails. And, take it from 
her harassed social secretary, she's 
had very, very few miserable mo- 
ments. Her vitality can put to 
shame a whole crop of eighteen- 
year-old debutantes. There are 
daily parties in her blue-and- 
white living-room with Irene, the 
chic, cosmopolitan hostess, presid- 
ing over the fun. And in the eve- 
ning the number of suitors who 
phone for dates would turn the 
head of the most popular co-ed. 
Yet every morning she's up at sev- 




Irene Rich, a 
stage, movies, ra 



en-thirty to start all over again ! 
Not even a dark circle under those 
large brown eyes as penalty for 
the night before. 

This constant whirl is one of the 
reasons for her total lack of 
avoirdupois or that dreaded "past 
thirty hip spread." And also one 
of the reasons why she is still a 
"friend" to her grown-up daugh- 
ters. Oh, not the affected and ridic- 
ulous sort of "friendship" many 
puffing mamas try to inflict upon 
their suffering daughters. Frank- 
ness, freedom 
of thought, 
independence 
of each other 
and no i n- 
fringing upon 
each other's 
careers is the 
credo of Irene 
and her girls. 

Her diet se- 
cret is rather 
odd, but judg- 
ing from her 
five feet six, 
one hundred 
and thirty 
pounds of 
symmetry, 
there's no 
doubt as to 
its effective- 
ness. "Don't 
starve your- 
self. I eat 
about four or 
five times a 
day, but very 
lightly so that 
the stomach is 
never crowd- 
ed." 

Looking at 
her today, 
wealthy, pop- 
ular, well- 
groomed, with 
an envied 
place in so- 
ciety, it's hard to picture her as 
ever facing hardship — difficult to 
believe that at twenty-six, poor and 
with two children to support, and 
two unhappy marriages behind her, 
she had to go out and earn a living. 
She turned to movies. After almost 
twenty years of successful movie 
work she tackled radio. After a 
year for Welch's Grape Juice every 
Friday on NBC, she's just been 
handed another contract ! 

Irene Rich can very well take her 
place alongside of Eleanor Roose- 
velt, Amelia Earhart and other 
great ladies of the day. because to 
the millions of women who see the 
heartbreak in their first gray hair 
she is the inspiring example that 
"life does begin at 40." 



Ray Lee Jackson 

success of the 
dio and society. 



Summer weather lures the Penthouse Sere- 
nades, Maestro Charles Gaylord, Script- 
writer Sandra Michael, Singer Don Mario. 



Speechless, for once, Fibber McGee (Jim 
Jordan) listens white his spouse, Molly, 
(who is Marian Jordan) does the talking. 





y 

f ; 




Cyril Pitts ((eft), tenor, and Morgan L 
Eastman, musical director of the Carnation 
program, on Mr. Eastman's 42-foot cruiser. 




If 



You've read of Nils T. Granlund and his 
girls. Here is lovely chorine, Pay Carroll, 
rehearsing with Nils for their broadcast. 



Swinging around the circle with radio's whirling stars, 



the camera-man brings you new glimpses of your favorites 



Hi&lAJ}- 90 -bound 



Virginia Haig, of 
California, sings 
with Tom Coakley. 



And here is Tom 
Coakley, now in the 
East with his band. 



An announcer who 
might also be a 
singer, Norman Barry. 



Paul Whiteman's 
pianist-vocalist, 
popular Ramona. 





Upper Left, Irma Glenn 
organist of the "Galaxy 
of Stars". (Above) Show- 
boat's Captain Henry, 
Frank Mclntyre, broadcasts. 




Beauty adviser, 
Miss Dorothy 
Hamilton, of 
Hollywood, now 
broadcasts on 
the "Penthouse 
Serenade"show. 



One of radio's 
most popular 
masters of 
ceremonies, Al 
Pearce won his 
fame out on the 
West Coast, won 
it again when 
he came East 
with his gang. 



Helene Dumas 
appeared in 
stock, then was 
heard in many 
roles on the 
air before she 
was selected 
by Gertrude 
Berg for the 
House of Glass. 



Brilliant young baritone 
Igor Gorin came from 
Vienna to New York, then 
flew to Hollywood to 
sing in "Hollywood Hotel". 



His diction is termc 
"the finest Ameri< 
accent on the air", 
is Barton Yarborouc 
of One Man's Family. 





Wide WoH 



(Above) They plan to wed soonl Frank Parker 
a mo us radio star, and lovely Dorothy Martin. 
(Below) The Voice of Experience is godfather 
to the son of Manager and Mrs. Elmer Rogers. 




' jl / 



TO!- i ' 




HotUlotse 



- World Photos 



In the upper picture, Donna Damerel, "Marge" of the team 
of "Myrt and Marge", with her real husband, Gene 
Kretsinger, also a radio star. And above, Jack Arnold, 
with his team-mates, Myrt and Marge, before a broadcast. 



IF you were an air diva and one of etherland's 
eligible bachelors persuaded you to accompany 
him to the altar, would you consider your 
chances for marital happiness above the aver- 
age? Would you assume that success in a field 
whose rewards are gold, glamor and a certain 
sort of highly pleasurable excitement should exempt you 
from the problems and pitfalls besetting less famed, less 
fortunate brides? 

Before you answer, glance over this account of the 




How Marge and her husband 
triumph over the radio jinx 



obstacles which Donna Damerel has had to surmount to 
insure the permanence of her marriage to Gene Kret- 
singer. See why it hasn't been all orchids and oysters 
for this air-famous young matron whose performance as 
Marge, the sweetly unsophisticated stepping sister in that 
back-of- Broadway serial, "Myrt and Marge," has helped 
make radio history. 

Observe the scrap which her strapping, six-foot other 
half — the Gene Kretsinger of Columbia's popular Gene 
and Charlie Melody team— has been putting up to insure 
his rights as a husband. Note, too, how in this struggle 
for wedded bliss, they've been battling, not each other, 
but the invisible forces to which they are indebted for 
their chance for happiness. Radio! 

They'd have you believe, would Marge and Gene, that 
radio performers who fall in love and marry are exposed 
to a brand of trouble unknown by the average bride and 
groom. Especially is this true when the r.p.'s belong, 
as they do, to different air teams. 

No combination of mothers-in-law, it would seem, can 
cause so many headaches as membership in diverse air 
units. For example, last summer when Marge was on 
vacation, Gene felt a sudden urge to chuck the commer- 
cial that was keeping his nose to the microphone and 
follow his bride to California. It was a normal im- 
pulse. Still. he dared not obey it. Why? By doing so, 
he would have jeopardized not only his own radio future, 
but — and this was the catch— that of his team-mate and 
brother, Charlie Kretsinger. 

Nor is Marge immunized against this sense of obliga- 
tion. One afternoon a year 
ago, while she and Gene 
were blithely cantering 
along a bridle path in the 
forested outskirts of Chi- 
cago, his horse shied and 
he suffered a nasty spill. So 

(Continued on page 72) 



What did George Burnt 
tell Gracie Allen? See 
our CRAZY CAPTIONS 
contest, Pages 32-33. 



41 






"Forget your past," they said. 
But Carol chose to remember it 



THIS IS an untold story — the never-be fore- printed 
truth about Carol Deis. 

It tells why the red-headed singing star, whom you 
hear three times a week over an NBC network, has 
kept the existence of a little seven-year-old named: 
Don nit — ner son — a secret. 

It might even point a moral for other radio stars who are- 
victims of the same situation that was shaped for her five years 
ago. 

Five years ago . . . Carol's story doesn't actually start then.: 
It liegins with that breathless, emotion-charged moment three 
years earlier in the living-room of a tiny bride's house in Oak- 
wood, a suburb of Dayton, Ohio. Yes, it was her house ; but 111 
tell you'about that later. For the moment, five years ago must do. 

That summer, Carol won the national Atwater Kent auditions.^ 
It was the biggest award radio could give then — a sort of a 
glorified amateur contest in which the prize was not fifty dollars 
and a week's engagement at the Roxy, but a five-thousand-dollar 
scholarship and the promise of a spectacular future on the air. 
As in the amateur contest of today, butchers and clerks and 
dressmakers and models were entered. Carol, who won, was a 
stenographer. 

Exultantly Carol accepted her award and the "admiration of an; 
audience that had been as delighted with her sparkling green 
eyes and undeniable attractiveness as it had been with her roaring 
voice. This was the perfect climax to two years of devotion 
to an almost hopeless task — the perfect present to take l»ack to 
a two-year-old tyke who, with childish conviction, had said : 
"Mama win," when she had left home two days before. 

However, Carol had reckoned without publicity, the little en-" 
gine that keeps the wheels of radio whirling. And she was 
not aware of some still prevalent moss-covered ideas, which 
should have been abandoned with crystal sets and bustles. She 
arranged for her inevitable interview for the press and the bland 
executive who conducted it started off with a favorite question: 

"To what," he asked smilingly, "do you owe your great 
success y 

And Carol was off on her favorite subject. "To my little 
boy." she exclaimed. "He's got brown eyes. Big ones." 

The executive frowned. "Then you're married?" 

Carol hesitated. "No. I'm divorced" — and she told about the 
breathless moment. 

Three years before, she had come hack to the little bride's- 
house. after having left it for good. She had come into the 
room built for happiness and she had wondered if this event — 
this blessed event — that had Drought her hack would dispel the 
despair the room had known. For tliat one. breathless moment, 
she had wondered. Then she had decided it might. 

"But it didn't," she told the executive gravely. "For a while, 
after Donnie was born, my ' ishand and I got along. We would 
laugh together at him in his crib and let him play with our 
finders. But it didn't last. 

"There are a few arguments for divorce and many against it. 
it's a dreadful thing. Ours had to (Continued on page 91) 



Deis Confesses 





h/Uai's Belaud Joe took ? 




Joe-can laugh away every hard- 
ship he has known— except one 



TWO little boys gazed at their father in his coffin. 
Holy candles, casting fitful shadows on the plaster 
walls, sputtered Hght across the face of their weeping 
mother. Two days before her husband had been 
brought home dead — and a hero. He had taken his 
pa i nting class for an outing at a lake near Grand Rapids, Mich- 
igan. They were having a gay time in the water when suddenly 
there was a frightened cry. One of the boys had jfone out 
beyond his depth. Joe Lopez forgot that most of his pupils 
could swim much letter than he. He forgot that he had a wife 
j -and two children at home ; he forgot everything except that a boy 
was drowning. And when others got the two out, the student 
was revived — but Joe Lopez was dead. 

Joe Cook can't remember any of this. He can't even remem- 
Jber bow he felt two months later when he sat in the cool, candle- 
Jit church a^ an old priest read the same solemn service over the 
body of his mother. He was far too young to realize what it 
meant to be an orphan. He only* knows today what people have 
tojd him : that when his mother s funeral was over, he left the 
cemetery with his older brother, I-eo, arkl ah eldcrty retired 
couple named Cook. 

The Cooks never had any children of their own. They liked 
boys, so they adopted Joe and Leo Lopez. They tried to guard 
the two youngsters against the world as once they had shielded 
them from the prying eyes of small-town neighbors in a grave- 
yard at dusk. They hid. as though it were some deep disgrace, 
the fact that the boys had slept for two years m the pulled-out 
drawers of a worn theatrical trunk, hack in the days when their 
parents were vaudeville troupers. They planned for them to 
grow up far removed from the atmosphere of footlights and 
grease paint. 

But- the theatre had been born in Joe Lopez' children, too strong 
to be overcome by environment. The urge to perform ran 
through their veins. By the time Joe was-^even he was using 
his foster-mother's clothes-line to walk. tight-Tope in the most 
approved circus fashion. She objected strenuously, but in her 
fondness she allowed him to continue. And within two years 
Joe Cook was proprietor of the biggest backyard pin-show in 
the outskirts of the then steadily growing town of Evansville, 
Indiana. He sola penny pink lemonades and hot dogs; he re- 
modeled the old barn to resemble as closely as possible the Evans- 
ville opry house — and he brought more song and laughter to 
that neighWhood than it has ever seen since. 

Today his happiest hours are the occasional ones spent in 
walking quietly alxnit the scenes of his childhood, back home. 
The very roots of his life are there. In a public square stands 
a monument to Joe Cook — the only monument ever erected to 
an actor while he was still alive. Nobody was allowed to donate 
more than two dollars to it ; it was made possible by dimes, 
quarters ~and half dollars given with full hearts by oldsters who 
remember the days when an elf lived in Evansville. and by 
youngsters who laugh up their sleeves at Skippy and would 
give up their new red wagons to 1* like Joe Cook. There he 
can have not only the keys to the city but the city itself, if he 
should happen to want it. He always could. 

"The glibhest cajoling I ever did was to persuade my foster- 
mother to install fifty electric lights in that barn, when the old 
homestead got along as l>est it could with merely gas. And 
that was some cajoling," he' sighed, sinking into a comfortably 
upholstered chair at the Educational (Continued on page 75) 



Ay, Bland 
1ftulkc>ttc<Md 



He become 
an idol, and 
he still remains 
the salt of the, 
earth. Everyone 
loves Joe Cook. 





r*^H^ IT W AS eleven o'clock on a Tuesday evening 
L^T^ in Studio 3fi of the National Broadcasting 
W 0%£ Company. The final note had been sung on 
M^^0 the Palmolive Theatre of the Air. the last 
LOBlJ straggling musician was tucking away his in- 
strument and the walls still held an echo of 
the wild applause given the entire cast. Gladys Swarth- 
out, regal in a gold cloth wrap, was walking out of the 
studio on the arm of her handsome husband. Rosaline 
Green, the actress, flushed and excited, was giggling 
like a schoolgirl as she rushed out of the studio to meet 
her date. Al Goodman, the leader of the Palmolive 
Orchestra, in full dress, bowed and smiled to the people 
who swarmed around him. He was signing autographs ; 
he was laughing and talking to some of his mink-coated, 
top-hatted friends nearby and presently he left, the center 
of an admiring, noisy throng. You couldn't miss the aura 
of glamour, power and gaiety that surrounded him. 

I heard a man next to me say to his companion " l lee, 
he certainly is lucky! He has everything. How 1 envy 
him !" 

Envy him? Listen to this-: 

In the last year Fate has dealt Al Goodman three 
staggering blows. How he has stood them without 
collapsing. I don't know. 

In the summer of 1933, Al Goodman once said to me: 
"I'm the happiest man in the world. I have everything 
to live for." 

In the fall of 1934, Al Goodman,, crushed in spirit, 
broken of heart and looking ten years older said: "I'm 
the unhappiest man in the world. 1 have nothing— 
absolutely nothing to live for. 1 would gladly exchange 
my life with that of a miner " 

And Al Goodman meant it. If you think you've 
had tough luck, wait till you hear his tragic story. 

In spite of the fact that Al Goodman is. and has been 

Al Goodman still laughs, but there is a feverish tinge 

44 j 
1 




for twenty-five years, a definite part of the Broadwaj 
scene, he has always been a "home man". Throughout 
those years when he was musical director for the Ziegfeld 
shows, and in spite of the gay parties, the l>eautiful 
show-girls and the whole mad scramble of backstage life. 
Al would go home every night after he was through 
working and take that same homely pride and joy in 
his wife and family as would any small town bookkeeper. 

He was very happy and terribly proud. They bad told 
him. when be first wanted to marry Fanny, to wait until 
he was older. He was only eighteen 1 And Fanny had 
been warned that musicians don't make good husbands. 
Such unsteady work, and the life they lead, yon know. 

And now they had the laugh on all of their friends 



(Above) Musical director of the Otto Harbach show, 
Al also has the Bromo Seltzer and the Palmolive pro- 
grams. (Rightj "I'm the happiest man in the. world!" Al 
Goodman said. And then rate took up the challenge! 
(Below) When he is at home, alone, then the desolate 
despair shows on his face. Only in work can he forget 
the tragedy and the incurable heartache of his life. 




Wide 
World 



Al was getting along fine, and they had two children 
whom they adored, Rita and Herbert. If they could 
have been accused of having a favorite at all, it would 
undoubtedly be Herbert. For he was taking the place 
of the other little boy who had died. Their first boy 
had died when he was a child, and just two years later 
Herbert had been born. 

"He's my good-luck kid," Al would often say, half- 
joking. It seemed that way, too. For, from then on, 
every year brought more happiness. There was his work, 
for instance. Day by day his reputation in show business 
grew. Ziegfeld was bidding for his services. George 
White. Earl Carroll. They all wanted this quiet, reliable 
un-Broadwayish fellow who knew his music so well. And 
with the increasing bid on his services each year, Al 
could afford to build up a solid trust fund for Rita and 
Herbert. 

And it meant, too, that his family could enjoy more 
advantages. Fanny could have two maids to take care 
of their beautiful, large home. Rita could wear pretty 
clothes and was in a position (Continued on page 62) 



to his gaiety. And now we can understand the reason 

45 



RADIO STARS 

A man who wouldn't take advice— and a man who came back 




"DON'T take advice!" These startling words 
came from the sensitive lips of Mario Cham- 
lee. And Mario isn't talking through a cocked 
hat, either, for his whole career has been built 
on defiance to those who have told him, "Don't 
do this," "Don't do that." Three times he was given 
advice by men older, more experienced and wiser than 
himself. In those three crossroads of his life he had the 
audacity to turn a deaf ear to their advice and thus 
heaped upon his impulsive head the coals of criticism 
and hardship. But if he had listened — well, today he'd 
be anything but the delightful Tony of NBC's "Tony and 
Gus" series. 

It was his father who issued the first "don't." A 
strict Methodist, he was shocked when he learned of his 
son's plans to become a singer. "No child of mine will 
become connected with the stage !" And Mario, who 
had been reared to abide by the rules of his 
parents, for the first time let his father 
storm and rant and threaten and 
then did exactly as he pleased. 
He continued at the University 
of Southern California, near 
his home, but he took sing- 
ing lessons in secret. 

It was when he 
thought he was ready 
for the opera that the 
second "don't" was 
flung in his face. It 
was delivered by a 
famous English 
voice teacher to 
whom he had come 
for an audition in 
Los Angeles. After 
hearing him the 
teacher said, "You 
have a nice parlor 
voice to entertain your 
mother's friends. An 
(Cont'd on p. 74, Col. II) 

Mario Chamlee — "Tony" 

Ray Lee Jackson 





MID 




MEET Gus, of "Tony and Gus." He an- 
swers to the name of George Frame Brown, 
but in intimate radio circles he's spoken of 
as "the man who came back." Ask any one 
of the army of broken-down actors, and he'll 
tell you that the "rockiest road in the world is the come- 
back trail." But Brown, who saw himself suddenly 
careening from top position in radio to oblivion, made it ! 

If you're a radio fan of any standing, you surely re- 
member Luke Higgins in "Main Street Sketches," and 
later Matt Thompkins in the equally famous "Real 
Folks" series. Well, not only were these two lovable 
old hicks played by Brown but he also authored that 
homely classic. Everything was hunky-dory, the stars 
were bright, there was money in the bank, tra-la and 
Brown's feet were on the uppermost rung of the radio 
ladder. Then some imp of Fate tripped the ladder 
and down to earth tumbled Brown with a 
crash that shook the show business. 
It really began when "Real Folks" 
deserted the air after a long run 
and took to a personal appear- 
ance tour. All fine and 
dandy so far. It was 
booked through the coun- 
try and theatre man- 
agers were actually 
fighting for the priv- 
ilege of showing this 
popular radio act. 
But who had figured 
on the thunderclap? 
The first week 
Brown opened was 
in that memorable 
time in 1933 when 
the banks had a nasty 
habit of closing. Re- 
member? The theatre 
was already paid for, 
so Brown and "Real 
(Cont'd on p. 74, Col. Ill) 




George Frame Brown — "Gus" 




46 




.-v. you to tti« 

Musical ftag 
days, WSM, 
jorie Arnold entertains all 
youngsters from four to 
forty-four years of age with 
her merry music and her 
delightful nursery rhymes. 



n A Display Associates 
C. P. Hark. lac 



Here we are again with pages just for the juniors 



PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN 



9:00 KDST (1) — Sunday Morn In* at Aunt 
Susan's. 

(Sundays only.) 

WABC. WADC, WOKO, WGR. CKLW, 
WKBM, WCAU. WEAN, WFBL, WMBR, 
WQAM. WDBO. WGST, WPG, WLBZ, 
KLRA, WFEA, WREC. WLAC, WDSU. 
WDBJ. WMAS. WIBX, WWVA. WSPD, 
WORC, WDNC, WHP. WDOD, WNAC. 
WKRC, WHK, WJAS. WBIG. WBRC. 
WICC. WBNS, CKAC, WREC, WTOC. 
WSJ 8, WSFA. 

9:00 EDST (1) — Coast to Coast on a Bos or 
the White Rabbit Line. Hilton J. Cross 
conducting/. 

(Sundays only.) 

WJZ and associated stations. 

9:30 EDST (*4) — Junior Radio Journal- 
Bill Slater. 

(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 

11:00 EDST (1) — Horn and Hardart's Chil- 
dren's Hour. Juvenile Variety Program. 

(Sunday only.) 
WABC only. 

4:30 EDST — Our Barn — Children's Program 
with Madge Tucker. 

(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 

4:45 EDST — Adventure In King Arthur Land. 
Direction of Madge Tucker. 
WEAF and network. 

5:15 EDST (%) — Grandpa Burton — humorous 
sketch with Bill Baar. 



(Monday, Wednesday and Friday.) 
WEAF and network. 

5:30 EDST <%) — The Singing Lady — nursery 
jingles, songs and stories. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WJZ, WBAL, WBZ, WBZA, WHAM. 
KDKA, WGAR, WJR. WLW, CRCT, 
CFCF, WFIL, WMAL, WSTR. . 

5:30 EDST (V*) — Jack Armstrong-. All Amer- 
ican Boy. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WABC, WOKO. WNAC. WDRC. WCAU, 
WJAS. WEAN, WMAS. 6:30 — WBBM, 
WCAO, WGR, WHK. CKLW. WJSV, 
WOWO. WHEC, WFBL. 

5:45 EDST (%)— Mickey of the Circus. 

(Friday only.) 

WABC, WADC. WOKO, WCAO. WNAC. 

WHK, WDRC, WCAU. WJAS, WSPD. 

WJSV, WDBO, WDAE, KHJ, WGST. 

WPG, WLBZ, WICC, WBT, WBIG, 

WDSU, WCOA, WHEC, WIBX. WKRC. 

WTOC, WDNC, KSL, WBNS, WMBR, 

WHP. WOC, WVOR, KTSA, WSBT, 

WDOD, KOH, WBRC, CKAC, KGKO. 

WACO, WNOX. WHAS. KOMA, WFBL. 

WDBJ. KMBC, KLZ. KRLD. WFAE, 

WALA, KMOX, KTRH, KERN. KFPY. 

5:45 EDST (%)— Little Orphan Annie- 
childhood playlet. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WJZ. WBZ, WBZA, KDKA. WBAL, 
WGAR, WRVA. WIOD. WJAX. WHAM. 
WJR. WCKY, WMAL, WFLA, CRCT, 
CFCF. 6:46— KWK, KOIL. WKBF, 
KSTP, WEBC. KFYR, WSM, WMC. 



WSB, WKT, KPRC. WOAI, KTBS. 
WAVE. WSMB, WBAB. 
5:45 EDST (V4)— Nursery Rhymes— Milton 
J. Cross and Lewis James— children's 
program. 
(Tuesday.) 

WEAF and network. 
6:00 EDST (V*)— The Little Old Man- 
children's adventure story. 

(Thursdays.) 

WJZ and network. 
6:00 — EDST — Orgets in the Air. 

(Tuesdays only.) 

WEAF and network. 
6:00 EDST <%) — Buck Rogers In the 25th 

Century. 

(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day.) 

WABC. WOKO. WCAO, WAAB. WKBW. 
WKRC, WHK. CKLW, WCAU. WJAS, 
WFBL, WJSV, WBNS, WHEC 
6:15 EDST OA) — The Ivory Stamp Club 
with Cant. Tim Healy — Stamp and Ad- 
venture Talks. 

(Monday, Wednesday, Friday.) 
WJZ. WBZ. WBZA. 
6:16 EDST OA) — Bobby Benson and Sunny 
Jim. 

(Monday. Wednesday, Friday.) 

WABC. WOKO, WAAB. WGR, WDRC. 

WCAU, WEAN, WFBL, WHEC, WMAS. 

WLBZ. 

6:15 EDST <%)— Winnie, the Pooh— chil- 
dren's program. 

(Tuesdays.) (6:00 EDST — Friday.) 
WJZ and network. 



RADIO STARS 



JUNIOR JOURNAL 




Billy Idelson 

A "regular guy" is Billy Idelson, 
who plays "Rush Meadows," the 
boy whom Vic and Sade Cook 
are bringing up. Billy is fifteen 
years old and is a student in the 
High School in Maywood, Illinois. 



Pat Ryan 

Ever since she was six years old, 
Pat Ryan has been on radio pro- 
grams. She is eleven now, so she 
has been a successful actress for 
five years. She wrote the fairy 
play entitled "The Silver Knight." 



Walter Tetley 

A clever actor and good trouper 
is fourteen-year-old Walter Tetley. 
Once he cracked his knee-cap, just 
before broadcasting, but went on 
without faltering. Hear him with 
Buck Rogers, and other programs. 



IN K/NC AftTJfUft LAAfD 



( You who have listened to the Magic Hour on your 
radio knoiv hozv the children gather around the Lady Next 
Door, while the Hidden Knight transports them to King 
Arthur Land. There, though magic makes them invisible, 
they can see and hear what happened 
long ago. 

This is what they sazv and heard in 
one of those Magic Hours. It is a story 
of the brave King Arthur and the lovely 
Lady Guinevere.) 

* * * 

You remember how King Arthur 
came to Cameliard, to the Court of 
King Leodegrance. By means of a 
magic cap which Merlin, the Ma- 
gician, had given him, he was dis- 
guised as a gardener's lad, and he 
worked in the gardens of the Lady 
Guinevere in order to be near her, 
because he loved her. And he 
thought that no flower in all the gardens was as 
beautiful and as fair as she. 

Lady Guinevere thought him strong and hand- 
some, and often her eyes followed him as he worked. 




Lady Next Door 



Once she pulled off his gardener's cap — and at once 
he changed into a knight! But quickly she gave him 
back his cap and asked no questions, for she was 
a proud and gracious lady. 

Yet she knew that there was magic 
being wrought, for twice when she 
and her father, the King, were in 
sore distress, a brave knight, whom 
they called "The White Champion" 
because of his white and shining 
armor, had saved them. Once he 
even had slain the villainous Mor- 
daunt, Duke of North Umber and 
cousin of their enemy. King Ryence, 
who had demanded the hand of the 
Lady Guinevere in marriage. 

And Guinevere marked that when 
the White Champion came, the gar- 
dener's lad disappeared. And when 
the White Knight went away again, the gardener's 
lad came back. But she resolved not to speak of 
this mystery, but to wait and see what might befall. 
And now once more great (Continued on page 54) 



48 



RADIO STARS 



Clever Mickey O'Day has been on the 
radio for three years. Here he is as 
Christopher Robin, with faithful Pooh. 




On this page you will see a pic- 
ture of the club pin. And don't 
you want to own one? All you 
have to do to get it is to write me a 
letter and say that you want to join 
Radio Stars Junior Club. There are 
no dues to pay- It costs you nothing. 

* * * 

Watch for these pages in Radio 
Stars Magazine each month. They 
are just for you. A story. Pictures. 
News about child stars. Write and 
ask me anything you want to know 
about anyone on the children's 
radio programs. 

* * * 

Our club already has a fine list 
of members. We welcome these 
children to Radio Stars Junior Club. 
The club pins have been delayed, 
but each child will receive his or 
her membership pin as soon as we 
can get them. 

Here are the first to join: 

Barbara Strickland, Charles Strickland, Box 

02, Marlow, New Hampshire. 
Gertrude Cohen, 3900 North Smedley St., 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Clara Waller, P. O. Box 30, Clinton, Conn. 
Virginia Lee Gnratorich, Vera Jean Gura- 

torlch, 2850 Clay Ave.. Fresno, California. 
Milton Kadmllorlch, 1820 Thirtieth St, San 

Diego, Calif. 
Robert Jamonico, Albert Caradonio, 14 Hill- 
side Place, Tnckahoe, New York. 
Lucille McKechnie, 130 Second Avenue, Glov- 

ersville. New York. 
Frances Fox, 128 Kast 43rd St., Brooklyn, 

New York. 

Florence Gardner, 553 Charles St., Fall River, 
Mass. 

Adeline Ro»ln«ki. 580 Oliver St., North Ton 

awancia, New York. 
Byron E. Fnrr, Jr., Pontotoc, Mississippi. 
Mollie K runner, 112 Wilson Ave., Newark, 

New Jersey. 
Betty Heyl, 114 Heather Road, Upper Darby, 

Penna. 




Rath H. Strickland, 58 Bruce Road, Wal- 
tham, Mass. 

Ida Mae Riesberg, Box 11, Grassy Sound, 
New Jersey. 

Lillian Mello, 20 Douglas St., West War- 
wick, Rhode Island. 

Vivian F rates, Norma Frates, Edmund Frates, 
14 Douglas St., West Warwick, Rhode 
Island. 

Edith Green, R.F.D. No. 1, West River Road, 

Fulton, New York. 
James Gladney Rogers, Apt. 316, The Bryson, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
John Joseph Franel, 433 West Market St., 

Harrisonburg, Virginia. 

(Continued on page 56) 



I want to join Radio Stars 
Junior Club because: 



help me to get the pro- 
I want to hear on the 



1. It will 
grams 
radio. 

2. I can write and tell the players 
how I like their programs, and 
see my letters printed in the 
magazine. 

3. It will bring me a club pin to 
wear. 

4. It will help the editors to print in 
these pages things I want to read 
about child radio performers and 
their programs. 



The letters from these first mem- 
bers are most interesting. I am 
happy to know that you enjoy this 
Junior section. And I am glad to 
know what pictures and stories you 
would like to see in these pages of 
yours each month. I shall try to 
fill each request in turn. 

Here are some letters: 

Dear Peggy Lee: 

Your neio "Radio Stars Junior" is a grand- 
idea. I am a girl of thirteen and I always en- 
joy your magazine. I especially like the stories 
concerning my favorite radio stars. 

I'm sure the fans would enjoy stories and 
the life experiences of such young stars as 
Mary Small, Billy Halop and Florence Halop. 
Then also let's have pictures ' of them and of 
the casts of "Buck Ropers," "Bobby Benson," 
"Billy and Betty," "Jack Armstrong," et 
cetera. 

Please do count me in to join your fan club. 
I hope you will send me the club pin. I am a 
shut-in and would love to hear from other 

members. 

Here's ft oping to see my letter among your 
pages. And best luck to you and the club. 
Very sincerely, 

Clara E. Waller, 
P. 0. Box 39, Clinton, Conn. 

Dear Radio Stars Junior Club: 

I would like to join your new club so I can 
enjoy all the good times that you are going to 

have. 

Won't you please print some time a story 
about Little Orphan Annie f She's my favorite. 
Respectfully, 

Florence Oardner, 
563 Charles St., Fall River, Mass. 

I would like to print other letters 
in full, but as I haven't space 
enough in this issue, I will just 
quote a few lines from some of the 
other letters. 

Dlen Bobst (Route 5, Box 139, 
Vancouver, Washington) writes: 

Dear Miss Lee: 

My sister Cloe and I would like to join the 
Radio Stars Junior Club. Cloe is ten years old 
and I am sixteen. Is that too oldt 

NOTE : Anyone who enjoys the children's pro- 
grams, or enjoys these pages devoted to 
them is welcome as a member. Among our 
new members are children from three to 
sixteen. 

Pegct Lee. 

(Please turn to page 56 for other 
letters and news.) 

49 




Wide World Photos 



"ourtcsy Pyrex 



Um-um ! Southern Cooking ! Quick, Watson, my coupon ! 



•j 



AS our Cooking School, 
this month, features the 
Pickens Sisters {from G'- 
Qi[i^I§ awgia, suh) I suggest that 
■J' n we start this broadcast with 

a song of the Southland — a gay tune in honor 
of those states below the Mason and Dixon line, famed 
alike for charming women and delicious cooking. 

The verse of that amusing popular song, "It's an Old 
Southern Custom," seems to me to be particularly appro- 
priate. It goes something like this 

50 



Irtf A/ancy U/ood 



anctf 



"Down south wc still have chivalry 
Old fashioned hospitality. 
Time will never cliange our ways 
Even in these modem days." 



And certainly neither time, Radio fame. Northern 
"ways" nor a New York apartment have changed the at- 
mosphere of Southern hospitality that one meets the mo- 
ment one enters the Park Avenue home of the Pickens 
famil) 

First to greet your Cooking (Continued on page 70) 






"For Flavor and Mildness I've never found 
a cigarette that compares with Camel" 



Mrs.Van Rensselaer finds America 
gayer and more stimulating than 
Europe. "If I'm tired from the ex- 
hilarating American pace," she 
says, "smoking a Camel gives 
me a 'lift' — a feeling of renewed 
energy, and I'm all ready to go on 
to the next thing." Camels release 
your latent energy in a safe way. 

At home or abroad, Mrs. Brookfield Van Rensselaer smokes Camels. "Once 
you've enjoyed Camel's full, mild flavor, it is terribly hard to smoke any 
other cigarette," she says. "I can't bear a strong cigarette — that is why I 
smoke Camels." Camel spends millions more every year for finer, more ex- 
pensive tobaccos than you get in any other popular brand. Camels are milder! 



AMONG THE MANY 
DISTINGUISHED WOMEN WHO PREFER 
CAMEL'S COSTLIER TOBACCOS: 

MRS. NICHOLAS BIDDLE, Philadelphia 

MISS MARY BYRD, Richmond 

MRS. POWELL CABOT, Boston 

MRS. THOMAS M. CARNEGIE, JR.. New York 

MRS. J. GARDNER COOLIDCE, II, Boston 

MRS. ERNEST DU PONT, JR., Wilmington 

MRS. HENRY FIELD, Chicago 

MRS. JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, New York 

MRS. POTTER D'ORSAY PALMER, Chicago 




Mrs.Van Rensselaer at Palma de Mal- 
lorca. She says : "Americans abroad 
are tremendously loyal to Camels. 
They never affect my nerves. I can 
smoke as many Camels as I want and 
never be nervous or jumpy." Carnel"s 
costlier tobaccos do make a difference! 



Camels are Milder!. ..made from finer, more expensive tobaccos 
...Turkish and Domestic. ..than any other popular brand 

C 1936. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Sale 



RADIO STARS 



Even/ WmMe you See... STARTED UNDER YOUR SKIN 




Miss Ann Keeble, New York: "Pond's not only cleans— It keeps away lines, blackheads. 

' V BUT "DEEP-SKIN" CREAM 



reaches down — 

keeps common Skin Faults away 



Mrs. Douglas Robinson 



grandniece of the late THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 
and granddaughter of his famous sister, the late 
MRS. CORINNE ROOSEVELT ROBINSON, says: 
"Pond's Cold Cream makes my skin look clearer — 
tired lines disappear." 



1 LINES FADE when wasting 
under tissues are stimulated. 

2 BLACKHEADS GO when clog- 
ging secretions are removed, 
and underskin stimulation 
prevents clogging. 



3 BLEMISHES STOP coming 
when blackheads that cause 
them are prevented. 

4 PORES REDUCE when kept 
free from pore-enlarging se- 
cretions from within the skin. 



5 DRY SKIN SOFTENS when 
penetrating oils sink in, fail- 
ing oil glands grow active. 

6 TISSUES WON'T SAG when 
underskin fibres are toned 
up and stimulated. 



Ugly little lines .. . dreaded wrinkles 
. . . don't "just happen" overnight! 
Every wrinkle, every line that streaks 
your face had its start under your skin. 
Tiny fibres hidden out of sight, lost their 
snap — Tissues you can't see went thin 
and sagging. Then, one day the skin you 
do see fell into little creases. 

The same way with practically all com- 
mon skin faults. Blemishes, blackheads, 
sagging tissues— all start deep in your 
underskin, when tiny glands and blood 
vessels, nerves and fibres begin to fail. 

Skin faults go — new ones can't start 

What your skin needs is a cream that does 
more than cleanse — a "deep-skin" cream 
that goes right down and fights those lines 
and blemishes where they start. 

This is exactly what Pond's Cold Cream 
does. Its specially processed oils sink deep 
into the pores. There, patted briskly, 
Pond' s rouses the underskin. Circulation 



quickens. Lazy 
glands get busy. 
Fibres regain their 
snap. At the same 
time, long-lodged 
dirt and make-up 
flush out of your 
pores. Loosened by 
this deep-reaching 



Where Skin 
Faults begin: 

Below the dark 
layer is the un- 
derskin where 
tiny glands, 
blood vessels 
nourish your 
outer skin — if 
you keep them 
active! 




One creaming shows how Pond's Cold 
Cream cleans and stimulates. Right after 
it's wiped off, your skin blooms fresher, 
livelier — clean — clear to its depths. 

As you keep on using it, lines soften — 
blackheads and blemishes stop coming. 
Even very dry skin softens into supple 
texture. Your face takes on a new firm- 
ness — a radiant fresh-air look! 

Every night, give your skin this double- 
benefit treatment. Pat Pond's Cold Cream 
in vigorously. See the deep-lodged dirt 
come completely out. Feel your skin re- 



freshed, invigorated 
to its depths. 

Every morning . . . 
reawaken your skin 
with Pond's Cold 
Cream. It leaves 
your skin so soft 
and fine that pow- 
der goes on with a 
smooth, allover 
evenness. Pond's Cold Cream is abso- 
lutely pure. Germs cannot live in it. 

Send for Special 9-Treatment Tube 

Begin to clear YOUR skin faults away 

POND'S, Dept. K-128 Clinton Conn. 

I enclose IOC (to cover postage and packing) for special 
tube of Pond's Cold Cream, enough for Q treatments, 
with generous samples of 2 other Pond's Creams and 5 
different shades of Pond's Face Powder. 

Name 



Street- 
City— 



-State . 



Copyright. 1935. Pond's Extract Company 



53 



RADIO STARS 



S)n King -flttAut Jland. 

{Continued from page 48) 



trouble had come upon them. King 
Leodegrance had received a mes- 
sage from King Ryence, demand- 
ing that Leodegrance deliver to him 
at once the White Knight who had 
slain his cousin, the Duke Mor- 
daunt, and also to surrender to him 
certain lands which he desired. 

As he told his daughter of this 
message, Lady Guinevere's eyes 
flashed. 

"The White Knight, father?" she 
cried. "Thou canst not deliver him 
to King Ryence!" 

"I would not, even though I 
could. And I cannot. I do not know 
where he is," King Leodegrance 
said. "And I have sent word to 
King Ryence, also, that I will not 
deliver unto him so much as a 
single blade of grass." 

But he sighed, for an answer had 
come from King Ryence, saying 
that he himself would take by force 
what Leodegrance would not de- 
liver. Unless the White Champion 
again should come to their rescue, 
their lands and castles would be 
taken from them. He asked his 
daughter to tell him, if she knew, 
where the White Champion might 
be found — for it was known that 
the brave knight wore the Lady 
Guinevere's necklace, which she 
had given him. 

But Guinevere said: "Verily, my 
lord, I cannot tell you " 

And then the King spoke seri- 
ously to his daughter of the peril 
that threatened their kingdom, and 
of his fears for her safety. 

"It would be well if thou didst 
give thy liking unto the White 
Knight," he said, "for he doth ap- 
pear to be a champion of great 
prowess and strength. And," he 
added, "he doth appear to have a 
great liking for thee." 

A rosy flush crept into Guine- 
vere's face, and her eyes looked 
troubled. "Aye, father," she said. 
"But — my lord and father, if I give 
my liking unto anyone in the man- 
ner thou speak of, I will give it 
only unto the gardener's lad." 



King Leodegrance looked 
shocked. "Verily, there is more in 
this than I understand," he said. 

"Send for the gardener's boy," 
Guinevere begged. "He knoweth 
more concerning the White Cham- 
pion than doth anybody else." 

The gardener's lad came when 
the King sent for him. Respectfully 
he bowed to the King and to the 
Lady Guinevere. But he did not 
remove his cap. When the King 
ordered him to take it off, he re- 
fused. 

But Guinevere spoke: "I do be- 
seech thee, Messire, to take off thy 
cap unto my father." 

"At thy bidding, your Ladyship, 
I will take it off," said the gar- 
dener's lad. And bowing again, 
he removed the magic cap. And 
stood before them, a tall and hand- 
some knight. 

Guinevere felt her heart beat 
fast. And then she heard a gasp 
from her father, the King. 

" Tis my lord and King!" And 
King Leodegrance fell to his knees. 
" 'Tis my Majesty, King Arthur, 
himself! " 

"King Arthur!" Guinevere re- 
peated, overcome with wonder. 

"My Lord," King Leodegrance 
cried, "it is then thou who hast 
done all these wonderful things for 
us! " 

"Rise you, good King Leode- 
grance," said Arthur. "Have no 
fear. My knights soon will rout 
once and forever King Ryence and 
his threats. Thy kingdom will not 
be harmed. Thy daughter — is safe." 

Guinevere spoke softly: "Lord, I 
knew thou wert the White Cham- 
pion. I did not know thee for our 
great King Arthur. I am afeared of 
thy greatness." And shyly she 
bowed before him. 

"Nay, Lady," King Arthur said 
gently. "Rather it is I who am 
afeared of thee — for thy kind re- 
gard is dearer to me than all else 
in the world, else had I not served 
thee as gardener's boy in thy 
garden, all for thy good will!" 



"Thou hast my good will, my 
Lord!" Guinevere's eyes shone 
softly. 

"Have I thy good will in great 
measure?" he pleaded. 

"Aye, thou hast it in great mea- 
sure." 

"In such measure that thou wilt 
marry with me, Lady Guinevere?" 
King Arthur asked, very tenderly. 

And very softly she spoke back: 
"Aye, Lord, an thou dost wish it." 

He took her in his arms. "More 
than anything in the world, dear 
Lady!" And he kissed her. 

And so the Lady Guinevere gave 
King Arthur her promise. But first, 
before the wedding-day was set, 
he summoned his knights, and to- 
gether they put King Ryence to 
rout. Then he returned again to 
Cameliard and in the Court of King 
Leodegrance there was great feast- 
ing and rejoicing. 

And then the wedding-day was 
set. And, on the advice of Merlin, 
the Magician, King Leodegrance 
gave to Arthur, for a dower with 
his daughter, a table which had 
been made long ago by his father, 
King Uther-Pendragon, for his 
knights. 

It was called the Round Table. 

And so it was that King Arthur 
received the Round Table, which 
became famous in song and story 
because of his brave knights who 
sat around it with him. 

But his choicest gift was the 
lovely Lady Guinevere, whom he 
loved with all his heart, and who 
became his wife and Queen when 
they were married in Camelot. 

(This story was written by permis- 
sion of Madge Tucker, The Lady Next 
Door, from one of the episodes in her 
"Adventures in King Arthur Land." 
given in the Magic Hour program on 
WEAF. 

The children who took part in the 
play were Peter Donald as King 
Arthur. Ethel Blume as the Lady 
Guinevere , and Jimmy McCallion as 
King Leodegrance. Others in the cast 
were Hilly and Bobby Maueh. Xancy 
Petersen. Charita Bauer. Micky O'Day. 
and Johnny Most.) 



SI 



RADIO STARS 



Pimples were 
" ruining her life" 




| "I had counted so much on my 
first high school 'prom'! Then my 
face broke out again. I could have 
died. My whole evening was a flop. I 
came home and cried myself to sleep. 



Don't let adolescent pimples 
spoil YOUR fun 

DON'T let a pimply skin spoil your good times 
— make you feel unpopular and ashamed. 
Even bad cases of pimples can be corrected. 

Pimples come at adolescence because the im- 
portant glands developing at this time cause 
disturbances throughout the body. Many irritat- 
ing substances get into the blood stream. They 
irritate the skin, especially wherever there are 
many oil glands — on the face, on the chest and 
across the shoulders. 

Fleischmann's Yeast clears the skin irritants 
out of the blood. With the cause removed, the 
pimples disappear. 

Eat Fleischmann's Yeast 3 times a day, before 
meals, until your skin has become entirely clear. 

Copyright, 1935, Standard Brands Incorporated 




2 "Those pimples stayed. Even 
grew worse. Then, I heard about 
Fleischmann's Yeast. I began to 
eat it. Imagine my joy when my 
pimples began to disappear! 



JJ "Now my skin is clear and smooth as a baby's. I'm being rushed by 
all the boys. Mother says I don't get any time to sleep!" 

Many cases of pimples clear up within a week or 
two. Bad cases sometimes take a month or more. 
Start now to eat 3 cakes of Fleischmann's Yeast 
daily! 

Eat Fleischmann's Yeast as long as you have 
any tendency to pimples, for it is only by keeping 
your blood clear of skin irritants that you can 
keep pimples away. 



by clearing skin irritants 
out of the blood 



55 




RADIO STARS 



"The &Lult JQoom 

{Continued from page 49) 



Esther Berman, of Brainard, N. Y., 
writes: 

"I would like to join the. Radio Stars Junior 
Club. I listen to many of the programs. 
Bobby Benson is the one I like best of all. An- 
other program which I like almost as much is 
•Let's Pretend.' "... 

And here's a line from a letter 
from Grandpa Burton: 

May I take this opportunity to thank you 
for the novel version of the radio script of 
Grandpa Burton which appeared in the iufmSt 
issue of Radio Stars. . . . I feel honored to 
hare my story appear first in your Children's 
radio section of the magazine. . . . The illus- 
trations to the story are very good. . . . 
Very truly yours, 

Bill Boar, 
'•Grandpa Burton." 

Frances Fox (14) of 128 East 43rd 
St., Brooklyn, New York, writes that 
she would like to see a picture of 
the Horn & Hardart Children's Pro- 
gram. We will print one soon. . . . 

Gwendolyn Withers, of Putnam, 
Conn., also asks for the same pic- 
ture, and for a story based on the 
Bobby Benson series. Gwendolyn 
is thirteen. . . . 

Ruth Strickland of Waltham, 
Mass., writes us an interesting let- 
ter, listing the programs she enjoys. 
Ruth also is thirteen and hopes to 
be a radio star herself, some 
day. . . . 

And here are a few lines from a 
letter from one we all know and 
love: 

•■The children of the radio audience hare 
Been the source of great joy and help to me, 
ard I am very certain they will be fuSt such 
loyal friends to you in your new undertaking. 

Wishing yoti the great success tlie Junior 
Journal deserres. 

Most cordially yours, 

Ireene wicker 
"The Singing Lady." 

Errors will creep in! We apolo- 
gize for a mistake in the August 
issue, in which we said that Baby 
Rose Marie was eight years old. 
Baby Rose Marie, herself, very 
kindly corrects us in a sweet little 
letter. Here is her letter: 

Dear Miss Lee: 

May I take this means to sincerely tliank 
nun from the bottom of my heart for your nice 
story about me in your August Radio Stars 

magazine. 

It really is friends like you that keep me in 
demand With all my dear and many radio fans', 
and I know it's friends like you that I owe all 
mil success to. 

Believe me to be with many thanks. 
Yours in Song. 
A Iways, 
Baby Rose Marie. 
May I let uou know my real age? On Auouxt 
ir,th I will be eleven years old. and I would 
lore to become a member of your club. 

We might add that Baby Rose 
Marie's success, in our opinion, is 
due to the fact that she is a natural, 
unspoiled and lovable little girl, 
whose sweet singing cannot fail to 
delight any listener to her programs. 




1 here's a new man in One Man's 
Family! One of the youngest actors 
ever to read a role before a micro- 
phone, Richard Harold Svihus (you 
pronounce his last name "Swiss") made 
his debut in One Man's Family as 
Pinkie, one of the two grandsons of 
Henry Barbour. Richard is four years 
old, and can read words of even three 
syllables without hesitation. The pro- 
gram is heard on NBC-WEAF and 
network. 



A/eurl A/ote± 

Michael James O'Day, Jr., who 
was Mickey on the Lady Next 
Door program, thinks he would like 
to be a radio control engineer when 
he grows up. . . . Melvin Torme (9) 
and Lucy Gilman (10) play Jimmy 
the Newsboy and Mary Lou in 
Song of the City. . . . The children 
on the Let's Pretend program meet 
for their first rehearsal at 8:30 on 
Saturday morning. Miss Mack 
thinks they play their parts better 
if they haven't rehearsed them too 
many times. . . . Milton J. Cross, an- 
nouncer for the Children's Hour, 
brings a pocket full of lollipops to 
the studio for the children, every 
Sunday morning. . . . Ireene Wicker, 
"The Singing Lady", has composed 
more than 6,000 songs for children. 



She writes all the songs she sings 
and all the stories she tells. . . . 
Captain Tim Healy, director of 
NBC's Stamp Club of the Air, has 
lived on every continent. He was 
born in Australia of Irish parents, 
but he now is an American citizen. 
. . . Janet Van Loon, the Sick-A-Bed 
Lady, tells children who are ill in 
bed how to make animals out of 
corks, bits of string, or paper, and 
tells of puzzles and games that may 
be played in bed. If you are ill, 
tune in on her program and learn 
new ways to amuse yourself. . . . 
In "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch," Estelle Levy is Europena 
and Pat Ryan is Asia, Andy Don- 
nelly plays Billy and Amy Sedelle 
is Australia. . . . 



More Members 

of 

Radio Stars Junior Club 

Jeanne Mosher, 251 Main St.. Hudson Falls. 

New York. 

Kuth Kustelman, 208 Cooke St., Waterbury. 

Conn. 

Ellen Boost, Cloe BobHt. Route 5. Box 139. 
Vancouver, Washington. 

Marie Hodges, 302 K St.. South Boston, Mass. 

Joanmarie I Iricksen, '.(20 Atlantic Ave., At- 
lantic City. New jersey. 

(Jerry Betts, '-'27 Harwood Ave., Klyria. Ohio. 

Maxine Blakeslee, 04 Seventh Avenue. Brook- 
lyn. New York. 

Betty Jane Cone, 112 West Miller St.. Elinira, 
New York. 

Gwendolyn Withers, K. F. I). No. 2. I'utnain. 

Conn. 

Donna Kberlv, 020 Castalla St.. Bellevue, 
Ohio. 

Carolyn Kerr, 848 Kilsyth Road, Elizabeth. 
New Jersey. 

Joyce Elaine Reader, 20'J I'rcston St.. Hart- 
ford. Conn. 

Elizabeth Ann Eaknwski, 2122 North Kimball 

Ave.. Chicago, 111. 
I.orrainne Briickniaiin, '.>4(> Seventh Ave., 

S. W.. Faribault. Minn. 
Thomas M. Hancock, Powderly. Kentucky. 
Mary Ann llildner, 835 16th Ave., Irvlnjiton, 

New Jersey. 
Betty Jean Miller, Mary Jo Miller, f.21 S. \V. 

Thirtieth. Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Clarlsse <;. Willette, 4<» Gold St.. Sprintrlield, 

Massachuset ts. 
Marv Ann Morris, Apt. 82, 601 West 180th 

St.. New York City. 
Anne Oliver, 271 Grant Ave., Orantwood. New 

Jersey. 

Marearet Macy, 1»! Oak St.. Troy. Ohio. 
Joan I.evistes, e.'o Besso's Boulevard Villa, 

Rockland Lake. New York. 
Ksther Herman, Brainard. New York. 
Sydelle Wasserman. 207 Park Ave., Fnion 

City. New Jersey. 
Thomas Martini, Jr., 1124 Wells Ave., Price 

mil. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Baby Kose Marie, 63 Claremont Rd„ Palisade. 
New Jersey. 

Norma Sceback, Route No. 1. Box SO, Good- 
hue. Minn., c/o C. 11. Sceback. Sr. 

Charles Evans, 424 Crandall Ave., Xoungs- 
town. Ohio. 

Elmore Buck, Sterlinu Buck. 4088 Banks St.. 

New Orleans. Louisiana. 

Eleanore Fair, SI Raleigh SI., Chatham. On- 
tario. Canada. 

Bernita Kicbey, 488 Stockton St.. Ripon, Cal. 

Florence Alice Ball, lttKt Fitchland, Toledo, 
Ohio. 

Bussell Carroll, Elaine Carroll, IS Dartmouth 
Street, Everett. Massachusetts. 

Join Radio Stars Junior Club now! 



5<. 



RADIO STARS 




who guards against COSMETIC SKIN 



SOFT, smooth skin wins romance 
— tender moments no woman 
ever forgets! So what a shame it is 
when good looks are spoiled by 
unattractive Cosmetic Skin. 

It's so unnecessary for any 
woman to risk this modern com- 
plexion trouble — with its enlarged 
pores, tiny blemishes, blackheads, 
perhaps. 

Cosmetics Harmless if 
removed this way 

Lux Toilet Soap is made to 
remove cosmetics thor- 
oughly. Its ACTIVE lather 
guards against dangerous 
pore clogging because it 
cleans so deeply — gently 
carries away every vestige 
of hidden dust, dirt, stale 
cosmetics. 

You can use cosmetics all 



you wish if you remove them this 
safe, gentle way. Before you put on 
fresh make-up during the day — 
ALWAYS before you go to bed at 
night — use Lux Toilet Soap. 

Remember, this is the fine, white 
soap 9 out of 10 screen stars have 
used for years. It will protect your 
skin — give it that smooth, cared- 
for look that's so appealing. 




"A ^k^- 



Use Cosmetics? Yes, indeed! 
"But I always use Lux 
Toilet Soap to guard 
acjaimt Cosmetic Skin 

C/audeffeCo/berf 

STAR OF PARAMOUNT'S "THE BRIDE COMES HOME" 



57 



RADIO 



STARS 



TEST. 



•3k 



the PERFOLASTIC GIRDLE 
. . . at our expense! 




read an 'ad' of the 
Perfolastic Company 
. . . and sent for FREE 
folder." 



"The massage . like 
action did it... the fat 
seemed to have melted 
away." 



"They allowed me to 
wear their Perforated 
Girdle for 10 days on 
trial." 




"In a very short time 
I had reduced my hips 
9 INCHES and my 
weight SO pounds." 



YOUR WAIST 
AND HIPS 

DAYS 
OR 



REDUCE 

• • • ft costs you nothing! 

WE WANT you to try the Perfolastic 
Girdle and Uplift Brassiere. Test 
them for yourself for 10 days absolutely 
FREE. Then, if without diet, drugs or 
exercise, you have not reduced at least 
3 inches around waist and hips, they will 
cost you nothing! 

Reduce Quickly, Easily, and Safely! 

The massage-like action of these famous Per- 
folastic Reducing Garments takes the place of 
months of tiring exercises and dieting. Worn next 
to the body with perfect safety, the Perfolastic 
gently massages away the surplus fat with every 
movement, stimulating the body once more into 
energetic health. 

Don't Wait Any Longer. . .Act Today 

You can prove to yourself quickly and definitely 
whether or not this very efficient girdle and bras- 
siere will reduce your waist, hips and diaphragm. 
Vou do not need to risk one penny . . . try them for 
10 days ... at our expense! 



•SEND FOR TEN DAY FREE TRIAL OFFER! 



PERFOLASTIC, Inc. 

Dept. 5310 41 EAST 42nd ST.. New York. NY. 

Please send me FREE BOOKLET describing and illustrat- 
ing the new Perfolastic (Jirdle and Brassiere, also sample of 

Perforated rubber and particulars of your 10 -DAY Fit EE 
111AL OFKEK. 

Name . 



Address^ 

Use Couvon 



on Penny Pout Card 




SUNDAYS 

(Sept. 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th) 
10:00 EDST (%) — Southernaireg Quartet. 

WJZ and an NBC blue network. 

10:00 EDST (M>> — Dr. Charles L. Goodell. 
WEAF and an NBC red network. 

11:30 EDST (1) — Major Bowes' Capitol 
Family. Waldo Mayo, conductor and 
solo violinist; Roy Campbell Royal- 
ists; Tom McLaughlin, baritone; 
Nicholas Cosentino, operatic tenor; 
Helen Alexander, coloratura soprano. 
NBC Service from the Capitol Thea- 
tre to WEAF and network. 

12:00 EDST (1) — Salt Lake City Taber- 
nacle Choir and Organ. (From Utah.) 
WABC, WOKO, CKLW. WIBX, WSPD, 
WQAM, WDBO, WDAE. WPG, WLBZ. 
WORC. WMBR, WFEA, WCOA. 
WMAS, WBT, WBNS, WBIG, WDBJ. 
WSJS, WCAO. WJAS, WFBL, WALA, 
WBRC. WADC. WGST, WDSU, WNAX, 
KWKH, KLRA. WREC, WKBN, 
KRLD, KTRH. WCCO, WLAC, WMBD. 
KSCJ, KLZ, KSL, KERN, WDNC. 
KOMA, WIBW. WOC, KTSA. WACO. 
WTOC, WHP, WDOD, KRNT, KFAB, 
WJSV, KFH. WSFA. KOIN. KTUL. 
WOWO, KGKO. KFBK. 

12:00 Noon EDST <y 2 ) — Tastyeast Oppor- 
tunity Matinee. Johnny Johnson and 
his orchestra; guest artists. 
WJZ. WBAL, WJ1AL, 1V1IZ, YV'BZA, 
WSYR, KDKA, WJR, WCKY. 

12:30 P.M. EDST (1)— Radio City Music 
Hall. Symphony orchestra; Glee Club; 
Soloists. 

WJZ and an NBC blue network. 

2:30 EDST (Vt) — Between the Bookends. 
WABC, WADC. WOKO. WCAO. 
WNAC. WKBW. WBBM, KMBC. 
WHK. KRNT, CKLW. WDRC, WFBM, 
KMBC. KFAB, WHAS. WCAU. WJAS. 
WEAN, KMOX, WFBL, WSPD. WJSV, 
KERN. KMJ. KHJ. KOIN. KFBK. 
KGB, KFRC. KOL. KFPY. KWG. KVI, 
WGST. WRRC. WBT, WBNS, KRLD, 
KLZ, WOWO. WCCO. WLAC. WDSU. 
KOMA. WMBG, W r DBJ, WHEC, KSL, 
WMAS. WIBX. 

3:00 EDST (1) — Symphonic Hour. How- 
ard Barlow, conductor. 



WABC 
WDNC, 
WCAO. 
WMBR, 
WDBO, 
CKLW, 
CKAC, 
WREC. 
KRLD. 
KOMA, 
WNOX. 
WGST, 
KFH. 
KHJ. 
KFPY. 
WSFA, 
KWG, 
KVOR, 



WKRC, WLBZ, 
WHP. WMBG, 
WEAN. WPG, 
WBNS. WIBX. 
WICC. WDBJ. 
WJAS, WSPD 



WADC. 
WKBW. 
WK BN, 
WHK, 
WSJS. WOKO. 
WDAE. WBT. 



WMAS. WORC. WFBM, 
KWKH, AVDSU. WQAM. 
KTRH, WIBW, WTOC. 
WHAS, KGKO. WDOD. 
WDRC. WMBC. KMOX, 
WBRC. WCCO. KSCJ. WLAC, 
WALA, KLZ, KVOR, KSL. 
KOIN. KOL, KGB, KERN. 

KRNT. WMBD, WACO. 
WFRC. WFBL. KFBK, KDH, 
WSMK, WGL. WFEA, WGR. 
WISN, WESG. 



WHAM, 
WSYR, 
KWK, 



WGAR. 
KDKA. 
WREN. 



DHV BV 
DBV 



3:30 EDST (Ys) — Penthouse Serenade, 
Charles Gaylord's sophisticated mu- 
sic; Don Mario, soloist; Dorothy Ham- 
ilton, beauty adviser; guest stars. 
(Maybelline Co.) 

WEAF. WTIC, WTAG. WEEI. 
WRC. WBEN. WTAM, WJAR, WCSH. 
WFBR, WGY. WCAE, WW.T. WMAQ. 
WLW, WDAF, KYW. WHO. KSD, 

WSAI. 

5:00 EDST (V 2 ) — Melodiana, with Abe 
Lyman's Orchestra; Lucy Monroe, So- 
prano, and Oliver Smith, Tenor. 
(Sterling Products, Inc. — Phillips 

Dental Magnesia.) 
WABC, WOKO. WCAO. WAAB. 
WGR. WFBL, WBBM, WKRC. WHK. 
KRNT. CKLW, WDRC. WFBM, 
KMBC, WHAS, WCAU, WJAS, 
WEAN, KMOX. WSPD. WADC. 
WJSV, KFAB. WCCO, WHEC, CFRB. 

5:00 EDST (V 2 ) — Roses and Drums. Civil 
War dramas. (Union Central Life Ins. 
Co.) 

WJZ, WMAL. WBZA. 
WJR. WBAL. WBZ, 
WLW, WENR, KSO. 
KOIL, WMT. WFIL. 
5:00 EDST (%) — America's First Rhythm 
Symphony — I)e Wolf Hopper, narrator, 
with 8(i artists from the Kansas City 
Philharmonic Orchestra. (United Drug 
Co.) 

WEAF, WTIC, WTAG, KSTP. WTM.I, 
WHO. WOW, WHIO, WRC. WJAR. 
WCSH, WFBR, WGY. WBEN. WTAM, 
WWJ, WSAI. WMAQ. WDAF WIBA. 
WEBC. WRVA. WPTF. W.IAX. WIOD, 
WFLA, WAVE, WSM, WMC. WSB. 
WAPI. WJDX. WSMB, KOA, KDYL, 
KPO. KFI, KGW. KOMO. KYW, KHQ, 
KFYR, KFSD. WKY, WEEI. WCAE. 
KVOO. WBAP. KTHS. KTBS, KPRC. 
WOAI. 

5:30 EDST (Vi) — .Julia Sanderson and 
Frank Crunvft, Jack shilkret's Orches- 
tra. (General Baking Co.) 
WABC. WOKO, WAAB. WHK. WIBX, 
WSPD, WBNS. WWVA. WADC. 
WCAO. WGR, CKLW. WJSV. WHEC. 
WORC, WDRC, WCAU, WEAN, WFBL, 
WICC. WMAS. WFBM. KMBC, WHAS. 
KMOX. WDSU, KOMA. KFH. KTUL. 

5:45 EDST (Vi) — Bob Becker's Fireside 
Chats About Dogs. (John Morrell & 
Co.) 

WJZ, WBZ, WBZA. WSYR, WFIL, 
WHAM, WGAR, WJR. WCKY, WENR. 
WMT. KSO. KDKA. WBAL. WMAL. 
KWK. WREN. KOIL. 
6:00 EDST (%) — National Amateur Night. 
Ray Perkins, Master-of-Cercmonies j 
Arnold Johnson'8 Orchestra; Amateur 
Talent. (Health Products Corp. Feen- 
A-Mlnt.) 

WABC. WOKO. WCAO. 
WKBW, WBBM, WKRC. 
CKLW, WDRC. WFBM. 
WHAS, WCAU. WJAS. KMOX, 
WJSV. KERN, KMJ. KHJ. 
KFBK, KGB, KFRC, KDB. 



WAAB, 
WHK, 
KMBC. 
WFBL, 
KOIN. 
KOL. 



{Continued on page 82) 



Eastern 
Daylight 
Saving 
Time 



1 A. M. 

2 A.M. 

3 A. M. 

4 A.M. 

5 A. M. 

6 A. M. 

7 A. M. 

8 A.M. 

9 A. M. 

10 A. M. 

11 A. M. 

12 Noon 



M. 

. M. 
3 P. M. 



1 P. 

2 P. 



4 P. 

5 P. 



M. 

. M. 

6 P. M. 

7 P. M. 

8 P. M. 

9 P. M 

10 P. M. 

11 P. M. 
12 Mdt 



Central 
Daylight 

and 
Eastern 
Standard 
Time 
12 Mdt. 12 Noon 



1 A.M. 

2 A. M. 

3 A. M. 

4 AM. 

5 A. M 
M. 
M. 

8 A. M. 
M. 
M. 
M. 



1 P. M. 

2 P. M. 



6 A. 

7 A. 



9 A 

10 A 

11 A 



3 P. 

4 P. 



M. 

, M. 

5 P. M. 

6 P. M. 

7 P. M. 

8 P. M. 

9 P. M. 

10 P. M. 

11 P. M. 



11 P. M. 

12 Mdt 



1 A. M. 

2 A. M. 

3 A. M. 

4 A. M. 

5 A. M. 

6 A. M. 

7 A. M. 

8 A. M. 

9 A. M. 
10 A. M. 



Mountain 
Daylight 

and 
Central 
Standard 
Time 

11 A. M 

12 Noon 

1 P. M 

2 P 



M. 

3 P. M. 

4 P. M. 



5 P 

6 P 



M 

M. 

7 P. M. 

8 P. M. 

9 P. M. 
10 P. M. 



10 P 

11 



P. M. 
12 Mdt. 

1 A. M. 

2 A. M. 

3 A. M. 

4 A. M. 

5 A. M. 

6 A. M. 

7 A. M. 

8 A. M. 

9 A. M. 



Pacific 
Daylight 

and 
Mountain 
Standard 

Time 
. M. 10 A. M. 

11 A. M. 

12 Noon 

1 P. M. 

2 P. M. 



3 P. M. 

4 P. M. 
6 P. M. 
6 P. M. 



7 P. 



9 P 



Pacific 
Standard 
Time 



9 P. M. 

10 P. M. 

11 P. M. 

12 Mdt. 



10 A 

11 A 



A M. 
M. 
M. 



12 Noon 



1 A 

2 A 



1 P. 

2 P 



3 A. M. 
< A. M. 

5 A. M. 

6 A. M. 

7 A.M. 



3 P. M. 

4 P. M. 

5 P. M. 

6 P. M. 

7 P. M. 



8 A. M. 8 P. M. 



RADIO STARS 





et mi/ c/edtA &e a warning 
ltd all dt/ter CORNS, i/aunq or old I 

"Every corn that ever stabbed a human toe 
should beware of that arch enemy, Blue-Jay!"— 
wails this old patriarch, in death-bed testimony 



(1) "For 23 years I 
was the power be' 
hind the throne in the 
Briggs family. Mrs. 
Briggs had tried in 
many ways to get rid 
of me — even tried to 
murder me with a 
razor — but this old 
corn always 
won out. 




(2) Time after time I 
almost wrecked that 
family! I made life so 
miserable for poor 
Mrs. Briggs that she 
became cranky and 
cross — and Mr. 
Briggs would get mad 
and leave the house 
in a huff. 





(3) A kindly neighbor 
woman, Mrs. Allen, 
was the start of my 
undoing. One day 
when she found Mrs. 
Briggs crying, she 
whispered to her, 
My dear, why 
don't you get rid of 
that corn with this 
Blue-Jay?" 




(4) Blue-Jay struck me 
like lightning! In just 
a moment 1 was 
smothered in soft, felt 
prison walls. My cries 
were unheard and my 
stabbing went unno- 
ticed. My 23 year 
racket was over, I 
was a doomed corn. 



(5) When Mr. Briggs 
came home that night, 
he found a happy wife. 
They went out and 
danced just to cele- 
brate! And I was for- 
gotten. Now, 3 days 
later, my lifeless form 
will soon be 
lifted out. My 
dying w-ords 
are — Corns, 
beware of 
Blue -Jay!" 




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• Only a corn sufferer knows how 
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If you have a corn — even a tiny 
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59 



RADIO STARS 



-f/h Own IWotlt £nemy 



{Continued from page 35) 




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The next day Husing apologized. But it 
was too late. The damage was. done. 
He was a target once again for journalistic 
knives. 

The best liked guy on Radio Row is a 
sweet, young guy in Columbia's press de- 
partment. He asked me not to mention his 
name. So I will not. Husing, who has 
no sense of humor, insulted him before a 
crowded room; ■ They went down to the 
cellar of the broadcasting building. The 
kid is as big as Husing and very handy 
with his dukes. 

But again Husing won. 

He was rilled with remorse the next 
day, when I met him. He confessed he 
really liked the guy, and was sorry it 
had happened. But his worst enemy was 
getting in his licks. Husing was fighting 
himself. 

At the Kentucky Derby, he met Jack 
Foster. If there ever was a right guy, 
Foster is it. He was a radio editor be- 
fore he became an important executive on 
the New York World-Telegram. Jack is 
famous for his severity and his honesty. 



"Sit in my booth," Ted asked Foster. 

"I can't," explained the mild kilocycle 
commentator. ''I promised Clem McCar- 
thy I would sit with him in the NBC 

coop." 

"So," sneered Husing, "you're subsid- 
ized I" 

Foster winced, and walked away. They 
are mortal enemies to this day. 

Husing pulled the same thing on me. 

I was the guest of CBS at the inaugu- 
ration of President Roosevelt. Husing, 
Ted Glover, CBS news manager, Quentin 
Reynolds, of Collier's, and I shared a 
suite. 

Husing came home. There was a party 
going. The room was thronged. There 
were people there I didn't know. 

"Screw," shouted Husing to me as I 
sat on his bed, "you got to leave. You're 
subsidized by Columbia !" 

I think the only thing a newspaperman 
has is his honesty. Naturally I resented 
Husing's remark. We almost came to 
blows. The fight was stopped. I thought 
Husing had done a masterful job in re- 
porting the oath-taking. I said so in my 
column the next day. 

I had hardly got back into my office 
in New York when a letter came. It was 
from Husing. He was sorry he had been 
so crude. But that was the last good no- 
tice he got from me. I roasted him every 
day for a year. 

But he proved to be a bigger guy than 
I was. I was going to Washington to 
write a political column. He came over 



to my table in Billy La Hiff's Tavern 
where we all hang out. He stuck out 
his hand. 

"Come up to the house for breakfast to- 
morrow," he said. "You haven't a radio 
column now. I don't need you." 

There is a strange man. He insulted 
me when I could do him some good. He 
made a friend out of me when my days 
of boosting and bad notices were over ! 

So now you can understand why you read 
about Husing being a wrong gee in the 
newspapers. He doesn't want to, but he 
always manages to annoy the critics. It 
all comes down to the lack of humor in 
the best announcer in the world. His form- 
er wife is a remarkable woman, a fine cook 
and a generous hostess who is one of the 
handsomest women on Broadway. I do 
not know their secret sorrow. They 
parted with fine dignity, still friends but 
concealing their difficulty. I have been 
around with them many times, separately 
and singly, before and after their divorce. 

When Mrs. Husing married Lenny Hay- 
ton, the Micky Mouse of orchestra lead- 



ers, I wished them happiness. I am sure 
Ted did, too. 

The ladies like Husing. I have seen him 
and sat with him in the Broadway dead- 
falls with Estelle Taylor and Peggy Hop- 
kins Joyce. His name has appeared in 
print with that of Jean Harlow. 

But lately he is often with Ann St. 
George, a blonde and beautiful choir girl 
from the Hollywood Restaurant covey. I 
sat one night with Ted and Ann. A re- 
porter asked them if they were engaged. 

"That's our business," Ted said. 

There is not a guy in our town who 
plays more benefits. He is making money, 
and likes to spend it. You see him around 
and about, staking guys whose luck ran 
out, picking up checks for friends and 
scowling at pests. 

That's Husing the man — I like him, and 
I hope he likes me. 

He stands alone as a radio announcer. 
Office politics has robbed him of the ex- 
citement of news broadcasts he likes so 
much, and now he does only sports. 

The guy who took him off the big jobs 
says he has no change of pace. I have 
heard the flabby substitutes who have taken 
his place where the headlines are rigged. 
They don't belong in the same studio with 
him. 

The guy is a stand out. He is at the 
peak of his profession. But there's only 
one guy who may trip him up ; who may 
ruin him ; who may shatter his pedestal. 

The guy's name is Ted Husing. 
The End 



TOP! I Wouldn't you like to win a prize? 

On Pages 32 and 33 of this issue — 319 prizes! Yes, sir! 
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| ICTCfl | ] Read the rules — put on your thinking cap — and go 
" " ■ in and win one for yourself. It's a cinch! 



60 



RADIO STARS 



^ PALM OLIVE BEAUTY 



BOX THEATRE 



1 

changes its broadcast hour to 

FRIDAY NIGHTS 
NBC BLUE NETWORK 



:-'\ 



N 



OW you can listen to this 
delightful radio program 
at a more convenient time. 
Palmolive's famous series of 
one-hour musical dramas is now 
on the air every FRIDAY night. 
Over a coast-to-coast NBC Net- 
work. (Please see Friday list- 
ings in this issue for your local 
time and station.) 

Look forward to the same 
wonderful performances you 



The Palmolive Beauty Box Theatre is brought to you 
by PALMOLIVE — the Beauty Soap made with gentle 
Olive and Palm Oils to keep skin lovely. 



COMING ATTRACTIONS 




have enjoyed on Tuesday nights. 
The same clever adaptations 
from favorite stage produc- 
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cast of radio, concert and opera 
headliners . . . Francia White, 
James Melton, Theodore Webb, 
Jan Peerce, Florence Vickland, 
etc. . . . together with the Palm- 
olive 30 piece orchestra and the 
glorious Palmolive Chorus of 
20 voices. 



COUNTESS MARITZA 
STUDENT PRINCE 
MISS SPRINGTIME 
BLOSSOM TIME 
THE RED MILL 
NEW MOON 
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A contest so simple, so easy, and 
such fun to do ! In addition to the 
first prize of $1000 in cash, there 
are 1000 other prizes. Don't fail 
to listen in for complete details. 



\ 



\1 



61 



RADIO STARS 



'Tkc Man IVko Jlolt £vet(fthinj 



{Continued from page 45) 



Much 
mora is 
expected 

f ram women 
today 




These days are good to women. They have 
independence unheard of a generation ago. 
And with this new status every woman is 
expected to have a frank, wholesome out- 
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Take the question of feminine hygiene. 
The modern woman has found out that 
Zonite is the ideal combination of strength 
and safety needed for this purpose. The 
day is gone when caustic and poisonous 
compounds actually were the only anti- 
septics strong enough. In the past, you 
could not criticize women for using them. 
But today every excuse for them is gone. 

Zonite is not poisonous, not caustic. 
Zonite will never harm any woman, never 
cause damage to sensitive membranes, 
never leave an area of scar-tissue. This 
remarkable antiseptic-germicide is as gen- 
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Yet it is far more powerful than any dilu- 
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on the human body. 

Zonite originated during the World War. 
Today it is sold in every town or city in 
America, even in the smallest villages. 
Women claim that Zonite is the greatest 
discovery of modern times. Comes in bot- 
tles—at 30c, 60c and $1.00. 

Suppositories, too— sealed hi glass 
There is also a semi-solid form — Zonite 
Suppositories. These are white and cone- 
like. Some women prefer them to the liquid 
while others use both. Box holding a dozen, 
individually sealed in glass, $1.00. Ask for 
both Zonite Suppositories and liquid Zonite 
by name at drug or department stores. 
There is no substitute. 

Send coupon below for the much dis- 
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NAME 

ifleate print name) 

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(In Canada: Salnte Therese. P. Q.) 



to meet and entertain fine young boys and 
girls. And Herbert — well, there wasn't 
a thing Herbert couldn't have. But don't 
think he was spoiled. Far from it. He 
was a fine, handsome boy who had a 
grown-up mind and a wholesome per- 
sonality. 

Al and his son would talk and argue 
for hours at a stretch about anything. 
Very often, the boy would get the best 
of his father in this battle of wits, and 
Al would beam with delight and paternal 
pride. You could see the great admira- 
tion and companionship father and son 
shared. The boy already had displayed 
a remarkable talent as an artist and many 
professional artists, to whom Al proudly 
had shown his work, predicted a great 
future for him. Great kid, that boy ! Al 
Goodman's eyes betrayed his feelings for 
his son every time he looked at him. 

The succeeding years brought those 
intimate little episodes that round out a 
family album. There was the day when 
Rita married Irving Prager, a musician. 
And the time when Herbert was valedic- 
torian of his class in High School. Then 
Evelyn's baby. And the excitement the 
day that Herbert won the scholarship. 
When Al became music director of one 
of the most important radio shows. 

His happiness was mounting in a rising 
crescendo. Then in that fateful year, his 
whole world crashed around him. 

The series of tragedies started with 
the day last summer when Al bumped 
his leg against a piano during rehearsal. 
Like a forecast of what the rest of the 
year was to bring, it started out as an 
inconsequential incident, and suddenly 
turned out to be a horrible nightmare. 

When he reached home, the pain in his 
leg increased and Fanny called a doctor. 

"You've got to lie flat on your back, 
without moving," the doctor told him. 

Al thought he was kidding. 

"It's phlebitis," the doctor warned hiin. 
"You hit the main artery and a blood 
clot developed. One tiny move will break 
that clot and send it to the heart, and 
then — instant death." 

For three months Al Goodman, an 
active, strong, healthy man in his early 
forties, had to give up his work and lie 
flat on his back without daring to move 
his leg even a fraction. Can you pic- 
ture the ordeal he went through, with 
the dread thought that death might catch 
him unawares any moment ? Added to 
that was the fact that it was during the 
hot, sticky summer months and he 
couldn't be moved out of the city. His 
bed was like a torture chamber. 

Friends weren't allowed to visit him 
often, as any excitement might cause a 
fatal jerk of the body. It was fifteen- 
year-old Herbert who made those in- 
sufferable days tolerable. He would sit 
by his father's bedside and soon Al, lost 
in a discussion with him, would forget 
his trouble. The understanding between 
father and son deepened into a silent de- 
votion during those terrible months. 

Finally, the leg healed completely. Al 
went about trying to make up for the time 



he had lost. It was in the Fall, sponsors 
were hearing new programs, and Al was 
auditioning for several of them. He was 
busy and happy. 

There was one program he was par- 
ticularly anxious to get. The Palmolive 
Theatre of the Air was casting the drag- 
net for a new orchestra leader. The best 
known musicians tried out for the job. 
The prestige behind it, the money, the 
opportunities — it was one of the most val- 
uable catches in radio. 

Then the big day, last October, when 
Al was to audition for that show. "If 
I get it," he told Herbert excitedly, "we'll 
go out and have a swell celebration." 

He was in rare form that day. His 
expressive hands whipped his musicians 
into action and they played with the verve 
and beauty that distinguishes the Al 
Goodman orchestra. He was half-way 
through the audition when he was in- 
terrupted by a phone call. 

"It's important." he was told. 

His hands trembled as he put down his 
baton. He had a certain feeling that 
disaster lay at the other end of the re- 
ceiver. 

"Herbert is very siek. He's calling for 
you. Come at once!" 

He stood dazed. It took him a full 
minute to get the meaning of that mes- 
sage. Then he uttered a terrible cry and 
rushed from the studio. His violinist 
picked up Al's baton and the audition 
went on. 

Al reached home just before they 
placed the boy on the stretcher and 
trundled him off to the hospital for an 
emergency operation. 

It was internal paralysis, the after- 
math of an appendicitis operation. It had 
struck suddenly, without warning. 

All night long he and Fanny stood out- 
side that operating-room praying, too 
tense even to cry. Finally, hours and 
hours later, the white door opened slowly 
to let the doctor out. Al's hopes gave a 
frantic jump. Then he looked at the 
doctor's face. He didn't have to be 
told. 

Herbert was dead. 

That night he was told he had got the 
Palmolive job. 

It might sound heroic and valiant if I 
were to say that Al Goodman didn't 
flinch. That he still carried on and 
masked his emotions in a calm exterior. 
Pagliacci stuff, you know. 

But such was not the case. 

Al Goodman broke down completely. 
He gave up his job in the show "Life 
Begins at 8 :40" He wanted to give up 
his radio jobs. He wanted to give up 
everything. 

"What does all this mean to me now?" 
he cried hopelessly. "Nothing matters 
any more. I'm going to stay at home 
and take care of Fanny." 

That luxurious, eleven-room duplex 
apartment which was a cozy home before, 
now was empty and hollow as a tomb. 
Wherever he turned lie saw Herbert. 
There was Herbert's favorite book. There 
(Continued on page b4) 



62 




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'The Man U/ho j2o±t £vettfthinj 



{Continued from page 62) 



was that half-finished drawing. And that 
was the corner where he and Herbert 
used to sit and talk. 

He couldn't stand it any longer. He 
and Fanny made plans to move out of 
the house haunted with happy memories, 
and live in a hotel room. 

But during those awful dark hours was 
to come another cross to bear on top of 
all his sufferings. His father was so 
overcome with grief that his health be- 
came affected. The older Goodman 
wouldn't eat or sleep. His weakened con- 
dition and lack of resistance caused 
gangrene to set in his leg. One thing 
alone might save him. The leg would 
have to be amputated. 

And for the second time in one month, 
Al Goodman, terrified and grief-stricken, 
stood outside of a hospital door praying 
for a loved one inside. The leg was 
amputated to the thigh, and to-day the 
father is a wreck of his former self., 

Al Goodman returned to his work. And 
in it he has found some salvation, some 
small measure of peace. Many people say 
that he is a man of iron. They can't 



understand where he gets the energy to 
do much work. As musical director of the 
Otto Harbach series and the Bromo 
Seltzer program besides the Palmolive 
show, he is one of the busiest men in 
radio. He shouts and laughs and talks 
excitedly and rushes from one rehearsal 
to another. We who know him notice 
that he laughs a little too hard, and there 
is an hysterical tinge to his gaiety. It's 
not natural. 

"Why, the man probably doesn't get 
more than four hours of sleep," say his 
observers. He doesn't. How long he 
can stand it, I don't know. But he is 
thankful for that, because only in the 
whirlwind pace he has set for himself can 
he forget for a moment that terrible ache 
in his heart. It's when he is at home, 
alone with Fanny that the desolate despair 
shows on his face. 

And that's the story I wanted to tell 
the man who stood next to me in the 
Palmolive studio and said : "Gee, Al 
Goodman certainly is lucky. He has 
everything. How I envy him." 

The Exd 



J7 &>iret the J&tudloa 



(Continued from page 29) 



PEOPLE BEHIND VOICES YOU'RE 
HEARING 

David Ross. Sure he reads poetry, but 
you should see him ! He's a cocky little 
banty who walks around as though he 
were about to knock the head off of Jimmy 
Braddock . . . and maybe he could. At 
the microphone, while his silky voice 
reels off the rhymes, he looks as though he 
were going to bite the top off it. In a 
word (and you'll doubt it) : dynamite. 

Jessica Dragonette. This lovely little 
lady should be called the frigidaire — she's 
that cool. No matter what the excite- 
ment or how funny the joke, she neither 
trembles nor laughs. Her sister does her 
worrying for her, often approaching hys- 
terical nervousness in the dressing-room 
before a program ; but Jessica's only show 
of emotion before she goes on the air is 
devoutly to cross herself. As an example 
of how like a child she appears, they tell 
about one of her recent visits to a con- 
vent. On her way out with two of the 
Sisters, a nearby doorman exclaimed : 
"Wow, but they're dressing those kids up 
nowadays I" 

Major Bowes. He may be outstanding 
for his amateur hour, but to me he is 
most outstanding for the love he still cher- 
ishes for a memory. Probably the most 
heart touching dedication ever to go out 
over the air was that occasion recently 
after Charles Dillingham, in the studio 
audience, had responded to Bowes' invi- 
tation to say hello to the radio public. 
Dillingham told about a brilliant girl who 
came to him one time about a part in a 
play and how she became one of our great- 
est dramatic artists. "That girl," he con- 



cluded, "was the fine actress you all knew 
as Margaret Illington." . . . For almost a 
minute, the great network was silent ; and 
you who listened may have thought some- 
thing had gone wrong. But nothing had. 
The Major had been unable to speak. Mar- 
garet Illington had been his wife . . . One 
more thing : They tell me that he and 
Mrs. Bowes would slip into the Capitol 
Theater lounges almost every day and 
hold hands during a long performance, 
paying no attention to the screen. Since 
her death, the Major has not been in them 
once. 

SIGHT FOR SORE EYES 

NBC kindly sends me some information 
on its Kathleen Wells. "Kathleen," the 
little gem reads, "is an expert swimmer 
and only gets out of her bathing suit when 
she comes to Radio City for her song 
programs and rehearsals." 

Unless you have seen the shapely Miss 
Wells, you have no idea how interesting 
a performance that could be. 

PHONEY SIGNATURE 

It may be different now. but a while 
back, when you sent in for Dick Himber's 
autograph, you didn't get the McCoy at 
all. And here's how the truth came out. 

One of the bright lads had been making 
a nice thing of getting stars' signatures 
and forging them to checks that were 
palmed off as payment for "Material." 
1 limber was on the list. The autograph 
came and it was carefully copied. But the 
check bounced so hard it punched the 
bright lad into a cell — because Himber's 
secretary had been signing his autograph 
all along and her writing is not like his. 



64 



RADIO STARS 



WHEN THE AUDIENCE IS AWAY 

Joe Louis, the Brown Bomber, is Rudy 
Vallee's guest star, so you and I have 
dropped in to see him. Bill Robinson, the 
King of Taps, is there, too, watching over 
his protege. After Silent Joe rehearses 
his bit. Bill is asked if he would like to 
audition right there for a spot on a future 
show. Bill beams and says he would. 
Then our eyes pop ! . . . From under his 
coat, Robinson takes an enormous pistol, 
lays it on the piano, and places his hat 
over it. The studio execs go into a hud- 
dle, the outcome of which is that Bill 
is asked to unload his gat. 

Later, we learn that Robinson was pre- 
sented with the pistol and a permit by the 
police some time ago. Once in Detroit, 
he had occasion to use it when a bandit 
staged a robbery as he was passing. Bill 
leaped out of his car and gave chase. A 
cop, seeing him running down the street, 
whipped out his own pistol, fired — and got 
Bill right in the leg. 

Now you and I are in Leo Reisman's re- 
hearsal. Carol Deis, the red-headed lovely, 
and Phil Duey, get up on the stand to 
try out a duet and, after grinning at us, 
go ahead. However, no sooner are they 
down again, word comes from the spon- 
sor that he didn't care for it and that 
they are to do a number from "The Desert 
Song." Carol and Phil sigh in unison. It 
is the fifth time that the sponsor hasn't 
liked the song they chose and they have 
had to fall back on the old standby. 

You and I are now killing two birds 
with one stone. Although the guard at 
the door objected, Mark Warnow has got 
us into one of the Columbia studios for 
his Wednesday evening show. But, you 
say, we're watching Emery Deutsch's 
program which stars Tito Guizar ! Well, 
keep watching . . . The program nears its 
end. Emery steps down from the stand, 
still waving his baton, and Mark steps up, 
his music under his arm. Tito Guizar 
moves from his microphone and Benay 
Venuta takes his place. Now comes the 
end, the station announcement — and ten 
seconds of violent tuning by the orchestra. 
Mark waves his baton and we have — the 
same band, the same studio, but differ- 
ent stars on a different program. 

TEACHER 

Last month, I told you about Norman 
Sweetser, NBC production man. This 
month, I'd like to tell you about Martha 
Atwell, CBS director. 

Martha is a slim gal with blue eyes and 
naturally curly, red-brown hair. She is 
one of the very few women directors in 
radio — a lady whose voice you seldom hear, 
but whose judgment influences every 
word used by the actors in "Just Plain 
Bill," "Five Star Jones," "Mrs. Wiggs of 
the Cabbage Patch," "Broadway Varieties," 
and others. 

She was born in Bellevue, Pa. Bellevue 
is really in Pittsburgh, but she thinks it 
doesn't sound so dirty. She lasted a year 
at Mt. Holyoke College before she 
joined the American Opera Company at 
Rochester as a soprano. She still thinks 
it was enough of an education. 

After her two years as a diva, Rouben 
Mamoulian, who later became the fair- 
haired boy of both Hollywood and Greta 
Garbo, told Martha she would make a 
better actress. Martha, hoping that meant 



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65 



RADIO STARS 



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she would be a very good actress, assisted 
Mamoulian for a year in the direction of 
the Eastman school of drama, whereupon 
Mamoulian became a Theater Guild direc- 
tor and she became a radio director. 

Martha has many likes. Foremost is her 
job, at which she spends sixty-five and 
seventy hours a week, including Sundays 
and holidays ; next is horses, which she 
loves to ride and just look at, even though 
one kicked her at one time; the third is 
script writers, about which she has definite 
ideas, too. 

Martha thinks that 65% of the credit 
for a good show should go to the writer 
and she knows he'll never get any. She 
thinks the remaining 35% should go to 
the actors. She didn't even mention the 
director. She's modest. 

The nickname "Teacher" was appplied 



just the trouble ; sometimes, the customer 
would rather not know quite so accurately 
what he is getting. This "Hit Parade" 
of ours requires talent with more of a flair 
for, adventure, for surprises, for excite- 
ment. That's it . . . excitement. Get that 
in our show and we've got something that 
will pull as many listeners as the Cough- 
lin-General Johnson debates. 
Excitement wanted ! 

Remember this : old folks don't get ex- 
cited — or if they do it sounds like worry. 
Young folks do get excited. So what do 
we do? 

We do exactly what the creators of the 
Saturday evening "Hit Parade" did. We 
take girls like Gogo DeLys and Kay 
Thompson and the Melody Girls, and 
boys like Johnny Hauser and Charlie Car- 
lisle, and the Rhythm Boys. And we take 
a conductor like Lennie Hay ton who is 
just in his middle-twenties. Buh-lieve you 
me, with the fifteen authentic hits of the 
week for music, that crew can make a 
show. 

Maybe I'm wrong but I think this Parade 
of yesterday's and today's favorites is 
proving something. The critics sneered 
when the announcement first reached them. 
If you aren't a New Yorker you've no idea 
how radio critics can sneer. "We're al- 
ready sick of the most popular numbers," 
they complained. "Playing them once 
again is just going to make us and the 
rest of the country a lot sicker." 

They didn't figure on youth. 

Old ideas, any old idea, if the right kid 
gets a fresh grip on it, is apt to turn into 
a world-beater. 

Some of Mr. Lucky Strike's right, bright 
kids are : 

Lennie Hay ton . . . they have called 
him the Mickey Mouse of radio behind 
his back — is good natured enough not to 
mind even if he were called that to his 
face. The big news about him is that he, 
who was one of Broadway's best bachelor 
bets, is now a married man. And the 
woman is none other than Helen G. 
Husing, ex-wife of the gabby Ted Husing 
of announcing fame. They were married 
in Metuchen, New Jersey, recently. 

Born in 1908, just a few feet from 



to her early in her broadcast career, when 
she was directing kid shows such as 
"Skippy" and "Penrod and Sam." The 
kid actors . named her. 

Oh, yes — here's another sidelight on 
broadcasting. 

Recently, when she was retained to cast 
and direct "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch," the movie of the same name was 
being shown. Before Martha would let 
her actors see it, she went herself. She 
didn't think much of Pauline Lord's per- 
formance as Mrs. Wiggs, so Betty Barde, 
who was to do the radio role couldn't go. 
However, Martha liked the way W. C. 
Fields did Stubbins, so Joe Latham, the 
radio Stubbins, was permitted to attend. 
He now plays his part to the hilt, using 
Bill Fields' every voice inflection. 
The End 



one of the sidewalks of New York, Lennie 
has his mind full of such memories as 
only old New York could provide. Horse- 
cars, for instance. And the old Bowery 
which exists nowadays only in story and 
song. 

It was Paul Whiteman who brought 
him into the limelight. Already, Lennie 
had spent two years playing piano for the 
famous Cass Hagan, a next door neighbor. 
When Paul got him. he was ready to 
take over some of Paul's more tedious 
duties, such as conducting the orchestra 
during rehearsals. At first, so modest 
was the lad, he wouldn't get up and wave 
a stick in front of everyone. Paul had 
to insist, threaten to fire him. 

For years, he was known as Bing Cros- 
by's closest friend. From Bing. perhaps, 
he got his most astonishing idiosyncracy. 
He has one precious possession which 
ranks above all others. It is his mascot, 
good luck charm, and inspiration combined. 
It is an ancient, bent, bedraggled light- 
weight felt hat. He wears it during re- 
hearsals, auditions, programs, everywhere. 
For a while, during the "Hit Parade" show, 
he left it off and immediately things went 
badly. Gogo and Johnny Hauser and all 
the others begged him to start wearing it 
again. He did, and things picked up 
immediately. 

Kay Thompson is a girl from Missouri 
who is out to show the world. Born in 
St. Louis a little more than twenty years 
ago, she studied to be a concert pianist. 
After fifteen years of pounding the 
black and white keys, she decided to be a 
singer. They do things like that in 
Missouri. 

West Coasters may remember her for 
her broadcasts when she was working her 
way through college. She's got a habit, 
too, sorta, like Lennie's. She wears a scarf 
while broadcasting, but can't tell you why 
to save her life. Right now she lives on 
Park Avenue with two sisters. They are 
tall, blonde, willowy — which should be in- 
teresting to any stray stags about town. 
By the way, the trio collects bottles. 
Empty bottles. They don't do anything 
with them, just collect them. Some 
fun, eh? 

Happy-go-lucky Johnny Hauser is a 



Sum met Skow 

(Continued from page 31) 



66 



RADIO STARS 



chicken farmer. Really. Born in New 
York twenty-four years ago, he first 
learned to sing by doing solos at Corn 
Beef Dinners for a political club. 

Paul Whiteman has always been his 
idol and getting a job with Paul last year 
was the ambition of a lifetime. He 
thought he was set for life until the "Hit 
Parade" came along and offered him a 
featured spot. He wanted to stick to Paul 
but the jazz king said the same magic 
words that have booted many another star 
into the heights. Those words : "Get off 
my program and yet on one of your own." 
Johnny got, and you and I are liking it. 

About those chickens, he raises Leg- 
horns ... a thousand of 'em ... at 
Northvale, New Jersey. His folks run 
the place when he is away. Or courting. 
He is quite a courtier, by the way, always 
addressing the cheery dumplings of his 
eye as "The Duchess." Just a whim, 
probably. There's a new Duchess every 
week. Just another whim. When excited, 
thrilled, stumped or stymied, he always 
says, "Yeah, man!" 

Gogo DeLys has the darndest name. If 
you haven't heard it, pick yourself a nice 
cool spot and start reading. It is Marie- 
Jeanne Gabrielle Germaine Belzemyre 
Belanger. She's called Gogo because her 
baby sister couldn't pronounce Marie- 
Jeanne or Gabrielle or Germaine or Belze- 
myre. Or do you care? 

She is another California product, com- 
ing to the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia from Edmonton, Canada, where 
she made her professional debut at the 
age of seven. Jimmy Grier's band first 
provided the thumpa-tuinpas behind her 
canarying. Next, the "Carefree Carni- 
val" signed her to sing and "carry on." 
She loves to "carry on" and she'll do it 
at the drop of a hat, particularly Lennie 
Hayton's. 

It was Phil Baker who brought her 
east for his last winter's show and New 
Yorkers and other foreigners got their 
first good look at her. Strange fact is 
that the first twelve maids who worked 
for her quit their jobs after one week. 
Couldn't put up with her hobby, it seemed. 
Her hobby is whittling things out of 
blocks of soft wood. Cute, eh? 

Charles Carlisle is doing what the 
wisacres call a comeback. Several years 
ago Charlie won a singing contest on the 
radio and decided that he might get 
somewhere on the air if he applied him- 
self. What with his good looks and his 
high tenor voice, he did right well until 
the prankish nabobs of the business be- 
gan to forget that he was one of the best 
bets on their air. Result : he didn't get 
much business. 

But now the picture has changed. Young 
Mr. Carlisle, who is one of the snappiest 
dressers on Kilocycle Alley, is very much 
back in the radio framework. He is fea- 
tured on the "Hit Parade" and they do 
say he is one of the reasons the girls' 
schools in the East dismissed a week 
earlier than usual this year. 

Carlisle, who is also a New Yorker — 
Glenn Falls is the village — is another re- 
formed piano player. He learned the 
knack at the age of eight and still in- 
sists on "chording" after the third Martini. 
The End 
If you need money — and who 
doesn't — see Pages 32-33. 



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67 



RADIO STARS 




the Sectet Stoty ofi Seth Palled l 

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an effort to be himself. It was just as 
well, perhaps, because his nerves had con- 
tinued to tighten anyway. That's the way 
things stood. His bankroll was badly de- 
flated, his faith in himself was shot, and 
his health was shattered. Mrs. Lord of- 
fered to economize if he would leave the 
air. They had enough money to last a 
while. Phil said he wouldn't. It was 
not his way. 

Those were the reasons why his fam- 
ily looked upon the cruise of the Seth 
Parker as a God-sent opportunity. 

Phil came home one day with his eyes 
shining for the first time in months. He 
was actually gay, Mrs. Lord says, for it 
seemed he was to begin a great adventure 
that would smooth all his difficulties. He 
had arranged to buy, for a little more 
than five thousand dollars, an old lumber 
schooner that had plied ocean waters in 
the Australian trade. NBC would pay 
him to broadcast each week on a round- 
the-world cruise, and an ice box man- 
ufacturer would pay him for broadcasts 
down the East coast. Beside the five 
thousand, he would need ten thousand 
more for his share in outfitting the boat, 
but his home could be mortgaged — and 
it was. 

Details were arranged with scarcely a 
hitch. Mrs. Lord and their two little 
girls would join the Seth Parker at Sing- 
apore and it would give the whole fam- 
ily a two-year vacation while making 
scads of money. 

"Money," said Phil. "We'll make lots 
of it, I hope. It's a good thing, too, be- 
cause the kids will need it some day . . . 
But do you remember the time we went 
to Brooklyn and I was glad because the 
old lady hadn't found me out? 

"Well, I'm afraid the whole world is 
going to find me out this time. It may 
even finish me as Seth Parker, because 
people have violent objections to saints who 
step behind counters and sell ribbons and 
groceries." 

Aided and abetted by editors, they ob- 
jected almost immediately. 

They said his programs were fakes, 
though every program he put on was ab- 
solutely true to the announcement he made 
of it. 

They said the ice box manufacturer can- 
celled his contract in disgust, though the 
manufacturer actually offered Phil another 
and better contract, which he didn't feel 
he should accept. It meant his continued 
appearance in American ports, and Phil 
turned it down, with sincere thanks, be- 
cause millions of Americans expected him 
to leave on his world cruise. 

They said the progress of the Seth 
Parker down the coast was punctuated by 
"drunken orgies," though Phil is not such 
a fool as to so flagrantly jeopardize the 
reputation of his wife and family. 

In spite of these vicious rumors, he con- 
tinued on. The reason is not hard to see. 
Everything he owned was sunk into the 



venture and he couldn't let it flop. The 
Seth Parker moved to Haiti, through the 
Panama Canal, to the Galapagos and to 
Tahiti. The months passed. 

Then, in three vivid scenes came the 
strange denouement to a doomed cruise. 

The first is aboard the Seth Parker, 
weeks out of Tahiti. A hurricane is rag- 
ing through the rigging. Tons of water 
smash angrily at the decks and tear at 
the men clinging to life lines. Phil Lord 
is clinging, too, as the radio operator 
makes his way to his side and screams, "I 
sent it. The SOS!" 

"Any answer?" 

"Yes. The Australia, a British ship." 

"Good. I hope she gets here in time !" 

The second scene is in the mortgaged 
home of Phil Lord. Mrs. Lord is about 
to answer the phone. Two little girls who 
have been making the house ring with 
their laughter have tagged along behind 
her and are at her knee. 

"Your husband," says a voice, "has sent 
an SOS for help. He radios that the 
Seth Parker is in the path of a hurricane. 
Have you anything to say?" 

The children look at their mother 
eagerly. Anything to say? Everything to 
say ! But she must control her impulse 
to scream, for the children must not be 
frightened. Her answer must be casual, 
non-committal. 

The third scene is a newspaper office. 
A worldly-wise correspondent has just 
hung up the phone. He is surprised. He 
had expected a cry, then a torrent of ag- 
onized questions. , Instead, he had heard 
an almost indifferent voice accept the fact 
of possible death to a loved one. It 
doesn't make sense, he thinks. Accord- 
ingly, he decides that the SOS was a stunt. 
Mrs. Lord had known about it in advance, 
he concludes, and therefore wasn't wor- 
ried. He didn't know, as you do now, 
about two little girls. 

That is the absurdly simple reason for 
the debacle of the Seth Parker. It sup- 
plied the mortar that held together the 
ugly stories circulated about Phil and 
editors jumped at it, even though three 
days later they were forced to retreat in 
the face of a complete exoneration by the 
captain whose ship took off the crew. 

( Phil and four others stayed aboard the 
Seth Parker after the Australia had taken 
off the others because to abandon it would 
have meant that anyone could have sal- 
vaged the expensive NBC equipment 
aboard.) 

Soon after that, Phil sent his wife a 
letter. It ended: 

"I'll be home soon, honey, since it ap- 
pears we will he able to salvage some- 
thing from the ship more quickly than we 
thought. We'll see what we can do alx>ut 
this awful mess when I get there. W e'll 
have to start from the bottom." 

Never, I think, did Seth Parker him- 
self get a more pitiful letter than that his 
creator sent home, nor one that spoke be- 



68 



RADIO STARS 



tween tlie lines so eloquently of shattered 
dreams. 

He had been right when he wrote that 
he would have to start from the bottom. 
He tried for more than a month to get 
under way — without success. He borrowed 
more money — this time on his life insur- 
ance. He tried and discarded idea after 
idea. One, which was to replace "Music 
at the Haydns' " and got as far as the 
audition rooms, was a dismal flop. 

He was flat broke. The one ray of 
sunshine was the fact that during the 
two years he had been away, and in in- 
creasing numbers when it was learned he 
had returned, requests for the renewal of 
"Sunday Evening at Seth Parker's" had 
trickled into NBC. Those letters were 
the deciding issue. 

I was there the afternoon tilings looked 
most discouraging— the afternoon be called 
NBC. "I've got to have something," he 
told them. "I've got a wife and two kids 
and they've got to eat. If you have noth- 
ing — I'll have to try some other work." 

His plea brought action. Time was 
cleared for the return of the kindly old 
Maine philosopher. Although the reward 
did not compare with the princely sum 
Seth had once commanded, it did some- 
thing better than that : it gave Phil some- 
thing with which to steady himself. 

Just two weeks later Mrs. Lord and he 
went to see Jimmy Cagney in the movie, 
"G-man." As they came out of the theater, 
Mrs. Lord said suddenly: "It would make 
a good radio series, wouldn't it?" 

An idea ! It might be the thing to start 
him off again. Phil knew there were al- 
ready a number of "G-man" scripts float- 
ing around the studios. He also knew this : 
that Chevrolet, whose best program had 
featured Jack Benny, was looking for a 
new series; and, that NBC had given up 
hope of getting the account. He went 
after it! 

He phoned one of the directors and ex- 
plained his idea. The director liked it and 
called a special meeting for the next 
morning at nine. 

"We're for it," was their verdict, "but 
we must have the okay of the president. 
He's camping up in Wisconsin." 

That afternoon, a fleet of high-powered 
cars carried a search party deep into the 
state. Men on horseback combed the ter- 
ritory in which the executive was sup- 
posed to be. They found him and took 
him fifty miles to a phone. He heard 
Phil's idea. 

"It's fine," he agreed presently. "Go 
ahead with it." 

That is the story of how "G-men" got 
on the air. That is the story of Seth 
Parker's comeback. 

I remember the last time I visited Phil 
and his family. Mrs. Lord and I sat and 
talked. Phil was in the room. I could 
see the top of his head over his big chair 
as he polished his script for that Sunday 
night broadcast. He was busy and happy. 

On Sunday nights, at least, the old 
saintly Seth who sold ice-boxes in the 
radio market is reformed. He has come 
out from behind the counter. 

But can Seth Parker's kindly voice and 
gentle philosophies renew the faith thou- 
sands upon thousands lost when he turned 
salesman and globe-trotter? 

I wish I knew. 

The End 



Why do minds misbehave 

THE PSYCHIATRIST OFFERS TWO ANSWERS... 



Case No. 432 

Mrs ' embarrassed 
Frequently emo ing 
husband by te^P 

£ ueS ^t a ions Of fended her 
invitations ^ by 

husband semp j _ 

her inattention 

^ofrfe/durlng'a dinner 
W g °iven in her honor. 
DIAGNOSIS: 
^sanitary napkin 

jSd'SXp? ^safety 
and protection. 
CURE: Complete ~ when 

the afscovered and the 
was discove introduc- 
fear ended by in 

ing , t0 ^certain-Safe" 
naP*" 1 ( Cer ta dg _ 
Modess) that w make 
Sffi&& ? Impossible. 



Case No. 2S6 
Miss 0.H.F- Af f in 
TeacheI *hool Successful 
high school. * 

in heI \ w °^i7^f that her 
tured -n y rs discriminated 

SUpe n^t her maliciously- 
jS?t n n.°r f to e ti- school 
5SSS& Pa-id sus- 
CURE: Complete --when 
CaU W°in the course of 
tions. Her me g 

sure of affection. 



5R. W 




N- O-V-O..* the new do uche 
p o iv d e r. Cleansin g — 
deodorising . . . for the 
fastidious woman. 



Even if "accident panic" has never haunted you . . . 
protect yourself against the possibility of an accident 
ever happening. Get a box of the new Modess today. 
Its name — "Certain-Safe" — tells the story . . . and you 
can look at the napkin and see why it's accident-proof: 

1. Extra-long tabs provide firmer pinning bases . . . 
Modess can't pull loose from the pins. 

2. Specially-treated material covers back and sides of 
pad . . . Modess can't strike through. 

Thed ay you buy Modess is the day you end "accident 
panic ' forever! 

MODESS STAYS SOFT . . . STAYS SAFE 



69 



RADIO STARS 



(Continued from page 50) 




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School director when I went to interview 
the Pickens' recently was Mrs. Pickens 
herself, a young-appearing dark-haired wo- 
man with the marked Southern accent and 
slow speech so characteristic of Georgia 
folk. A remarkable woman, Mrs. Pickens. 
It is her expressed desire to remain very 
much in the background of her daugh- 
ters' professional lives. But I feel sure 
that her touch, delicate but sure, can be 
felt in the girls' every decision and I know 
for a fact that it is she who, with a firm 
hand, directs the running of their home. 

It's a lovely home, too. Fireplace, books 
and furnishings give the living-room 
some of the charm of a Southern interior, 
supplying a fitting frame for the gay 
young faces of the Pickens girls, Helen, 
Jane, Patti and Grace. 

Maybe you didn't know about Grace? 
Well, she's the fourth of the Pickens sis- 
ters. Originally one of the singing trio 
(before Patti "grew up") Grace now acts 
as business manager for her better known 
sisters and substitutes as singer if one of 
the others is ill. Certainly Grace is less 
well known to the Radio Audience, but she 
too contributes (as does the Mother) to 
the Pickens' success. 

There is another member of the Pickens 
menage who is bound to get a share of 
attention in any article dealing primarily 
with things culinary. That's Elnora, the 
colored maid, brought from Georgia 
(along with other "Old Southern Cus- 
toms") to preside over the kitchen, boss 
the other servants and watch over the in- 
terests of the family in general and with 
that mixture of adoration, loyalty and jeal- 
ousy so characteristic of her race. 

Yes. indeed, although Mrs. Pickens will 
tell you what her daughters like to eat 
and the girls themselves will inform you 
that they amuse themselves occasionally 
by making up some special dish (each to 
her own liking) it is to Elnora we must 
go if we are seeking detailed directions for 
making their favorite foods. "Miss Helen's 
Ambrosia." "Miss Jane's Fried Chicken 
and Southern Chicken Pie" and "the Baby's 
Brown Betty"! 

Oh dear, oh dear, I'll wager seventeen- 
year-old Patti Pickens would cheerfully 
slay me for calling her that, but the fond 
way Elnora says "the Baby" so well ex- 
presses her love and loyalty that I can't 
resist quoting her. The fact that Patti, 
Jane and Helen are now famous (because 
of their phonograph recording and musi- 
cal comedy appearances as well as their 
success over the air — they are now on 
the Bourjois program — has not changed 
Elnora. She just goes on serenely cater- 
ing to her "folks" and fixing up, day in, 
day out, the delectable Southern foods 
the Pickens' like. 

So let's go into the Pickens' kitchen 
and learn some of the culinary secrets 
which have made Southern cooking and 
Southern mammies famous the world over. 

The first thing to engage our attention 
(and rightly so) is chicken, to which, as 
you will have noticed, Jane Pickens is 
especially partial. Jane herself gave me 
some interesting pointers on frying chicken 



in true Southern fashion. (That grin you 
notice on her pretty face in the picture at 
the beginning of this article is one of 
justifiable pride over her one outstanding 
culinary accomplishment.) There are im- 
portant "do's and don'ts" in cooking Fried 
Chicken in true Southern style, according 
to Jane. 

"It's really very easy," Jane declared, 
"but there are certain rules that simply 
must be observed. In the first place you 
need a large enough skillet to cook the 
chicken without crowding. Then you need 
enough fat to cover every piece. You 
brown the chicken in the fat . . ." 

"And then you cover the pan ..." I re- 
marked, wishing to air my knowledge and 
having always done just that little thing 
myself. But at this point I was the re- 
cipient of several reproving, I might even 
say scornful, glances. 

"You most emphatically do not cover 
the pan !" Jane hastened to correct me 
while Elnora shook her head in a manner 
that indicated her low opinion of Northern 
cooking in general. 

"No, siree," said Elnora as we listened 
with the respect that should be given to 
authoritative information of any sort. 
"You-all don't want to stetv your chicken, 
you want to fry it !" And certainly that's 
what we-all want to do ! And we'll fol- 
low the Pickens' recipe, too, if we are 
wise. Later on in the article I'll tell you 
how to get it. 

When it came to the subject of South- 
ern Chicken Pie. Jane left the matter in 
Elnora's capable hands at the outset. Odd- 
ly enough Elnora turned out to be splendid 
at giving directions — not at all like the 
usual colored maid who professes to cook 
with a complete disregard for measure- 
ments and quantities. Elnora knows ex- 
actly what goes into her Chicken Pic and 
furthermore she is most explicit about 
directions for making the biscuits that 
form its tempting golden-brown crust. Un- 
der these fluffy biscuits nestle such treats 
as baby carrots, small onions and boned 
chicken, all smothered in a rich chicken 
gravy. (Aint that stimpin'!) 

You'll find the recipe at the end of this 
article. Be sure to cut it out and save 
it so that you can make the Pickens Biscuit 
Crust for the Pickens Southern Chicken 
Pie. And the way to get the latter recipe? 
Well, as always, all you have to do is 
fill in and mail the coupon. 

The ideal dessert to follow a meal that 
features a rich Chicken Pie, according to 
Helen Pickens, is Ambrosia. This is a 
fresh fruit concoction which Helen made 
up for me as I watched her. The collec- 
tion of thisa and thata was noteworthy 
and the results achieved (when they were 
correctly blended and sweetened) were stu- 
pendous ! Another nice thing about this 
dish is that by omitting one fruit and sub- 
stituting another it can be enjoyed the year 
around. The Ambrosia recipe also is in- 
cluded in our Cooking School leaflet this 
month. 

Another recipe in the leaflet will tell 
you just how to make Patti's pet sweet. 
Brown Betty. Once a week, at the very 



70 



RADIO STARS 



least, this apple and bread combination 
graces the Pickens dinner table to the joy 
of the entire family and to Patti's especial 
delight. There's a trick about making 
this dessert, I discovered from Elnora— 
not a fancy, difficult trick, I assure you 
—just one of those little touches that 
change "pretty good" into "perfect". I 
am delighted therefore to be able to pass 
it on to you on one of the recipe cards. 

So there you have a brief description of 
the marvelous foods you will learn how to 
prepare by sending for this month's Radio 
Stars' Cooking School leaflet. Let's see, 
110W — in the attractively printed leaflet 
there are tour recipes, carefully tested, 
simply stated, free as usual and particular- 
ly delicious in true Southern style. And 
remember that Southern cooking represents 
the most delectable dishes our country has 
developed— while the Pickens recipes rep- 
resent Southern cooking at its very best. 

Just think! For the cost of only a 
postage stamp you'll have explicit direc- 
tions telling you how to make Helen's Am- 
brosia, Patti's Brown Betty, and Jane's 
Southern Chicken Pie and Georgia Fried 
Chicken. The Brown Betty recipe card 
also includes a tasty Wine Sauce often 
served at the Pickens home as an accom- 
paniment to this favored dessert (it's like 
gilding the lily, I'll admit, but though un- 
necessary this sauce does add a sophisti- 
cated touch). The Fried Chicken recipe 
card, included in the leaflet, tells you how 
to make Cream Gravy, without which no 
such dish is considered complete. 

Quite a collection, isn't it? And al- 
though the girls may have been nicknamed 
"The Slim Pickens' " by some wag, there 
will be no "slim pickin's" in your home if 
you send for a copy of the leaflet con- 
taining all these grand recipes for the 
Pickens' sisters' favorite foods. So send 
for your set now . . . don't delay ... we 
expect a rush of requests for these splen- 
did Southern recipes and you'll want to 
be among the very first in your crowd to 
try them out. 

This is Nancy Wood signing off. The 
biscuit recipe follows (as promised) and 
that valuable little coupon. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS 
2 cups flour 

4 teaspoons baking powder 
% teaspoon salt 

Yx cup vegetable shortening (butter) 
H to % cup milk 

Mix and sift dry ingredients. Work in 
shortening with tips of fingers. Add milk 
slowly, mixing it into dough with two 
forks. Turn onto lightly floured board 
and roll out lightly (with floured rolling 
pin) to desired thickness. (Elnora recom- 
mends a thickness of l /i inch.) cut with 
biscuit cutter and bake to a golden brown 
in hot oven (450° F.) 12 to IS minutes. 

■ 1 

: coupon ■ 

• . 

\ Please send me the FREE recipes ; 
' for the Pickens Sisters' favorite '. 

■ Southern dishes. • 

■ ■ 

• m 

■ Name '. 

u Print in pencil ■ 

■ • 

• Street I 

; • 

• City State j 

.■ 



44 



. • • and you 
can stark blessing 
mother again 



44 






H 



ere s one little medicine-hater who 
is going to bed happy. She's just 
had her first taste of Fletcher's Castoria 
— and she loved it ! Now mother is back 
in favor once more. 




Do you know that even the taste of 
Fletcher's Castoria is made especially for 
children? 

It's one laxative they take willingly. 
And it's very important that a child should 
take a laxative without a struggle. For 
the fear and " resentment a child feels 
when forced to take a bad-tasting laxa- 
tive often seriously upsets her nerves and 
her digestion. 



laste good? 



But there's more to the laxative question 
than taste. Children's systems are sensi- 
tive, delicate. So Fletcher's Castoria is 
made just for children, of ingredients that 





are safe and suitable for a child. 

It contains no narcotics. No harsh, 
purging drugs such as some "grown-up" 
laxatives contain ... It will never, never 
cause griping pain. It will not form a 
habit. It is gentle, yet thorough. 

Buy a bottle today. Depend on it al- 
ways until your youngest child is 11 years 
old. Be thrifty— buy the family-size bot- 
tle. And look for the signature Chas. 
H. Fletcher. 



CASTORIA 

The Children's 
Laxative 




from babyhood ro 11 years 



71 



RADIO STARS 



RICHARD ARLEN 

PICKS 

NATURAL LIPS 

AS LOVELIEST! 



Tat flettet — Mot WoUe 



HERE'S WHAT RICHARD ARLEN SAW 



UNTOUCHED 




Film star 
chooses 
girl with 
Tangee lips 
in Hollywood 
test 

• a _ j _ _ . f Richard Arlen makes lipstick 
And most test betneen scenes of " Let 
men agree with 'em Have It," a Reliance 
Richard Arlen! Pictures production. 
They prefer lips that are rosy and soft . . . not 
coated with paint ! If you want your lips to be 
lovelier, use Tangee Lipstick. It can t give you 
"that painted look", because /'/ isn't paint. 
Instead, it brings out your own natural color 
. . . makes your lips kissable . . . more appeal- 
ing. For those who prefer more color, espe- 
cially for evening use, there is Tangee Theatrical. 

Try Tangee. In two sizes, 39c and $1.10. Or, 
for a quick trial, send 10c for the special 4- 
piece Miracle Make-Up Set offered below. 

• BEWARE OF SUBSTITUTES ...when you buy, 
ask tor Tangee and be sure you tee the name Tangee 
on the package. Don't let some sharp sales person 

stcitch you to an imitation . . . there's only one Tangee. 




FACE POWDER 




★ 4-PIECE MIRACLE MAKE-UP SET 

THE GEORGE W. LUFT COMPANY MM105 
417 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Rush Miracle Make-Up Set of miniature Tangee 
Lipstick, Rouge Compact. Creme Rouge, Face 
Powiler. I enclose 1 Of* ("tamps or coin). I5y in Canada. 



Shade 



□ Flesh □ Rachel □ Light Rachel 



Addrea- 
City 



{Continued from page 41) 




serious were his injuries that he had 
to be rushed to a hospital for surgical 
seamstressing. 

Naturally Marge wanted to remain 
with him. What wife as loyal and loving 
would not? Yet the fate which directs 
the destiny of the slim, exotic brunette 
microphone matron ruled otherwise. 
Where, at that late hour, could she find a 
studio substitute? Who could successfully 
play opposite her microphone partner and 
mother, "Myrt" — Myrtle Vail. So . . . 

While Gene slowly emerged from his 
fog of anesthesia, she slipped back, an- 
guished and ashen, into her radio role, 
bravely carrying on the wise-cracking of 
"Myrt and Marge." 

That bogeyman whose monkey busi- 
ness seems to be that of menacing the mar- 
ried happiness of kilocycle couples has 
been pursuing the newlywed Kretsingers 
ever since their first meeting three years 
ago. Hardly had they been introduced 
than he reared his head. It was not, as 
you might expect, an ugly head, but a 
well-shaped, sleekly-brushed one which, 
upon that particular occasion, was fitted 
snugly on to the capable shoulders of 
Brother Charlie. 

Earlier that evening Marge had ar- 
rived at the U. S. Veterans Hospital in 
suburban Maywood to help a group from 
WBBM put on a show. There her gaze 
had fallen upon a strapping young chap 
with an amiable grin who was making 
himself agreeable to a bunch of disabled 
World War soldiers. "Yank" Taylor, 
radio editor of the Chicago Times, inter- 
cepted her glance and inquired if she 
didn't know Gene Kretsinger. She didn't : 
So he introduced them. 

Later the entertainers adjourned to 
"Yank's" home in nearby Oak Park. And 
there they were, the sloe-eyed Damerel lass 
and man's-man Kretsinger, seated on 
some stairs in the front hall apart from 
the other guests, swapping life stories, 
when Brother Charlie intruded. 

"Time to blow, kid!" observed the elder 
Kretsinger. "It's three o'clock. Remem- 
ber — we have that National Tea show at 
nine-fifteen." Turning, he began to bur- 
row into a mound of overcoats on a chair 
at the foot of the stairs. 

Indignantly Gene glared at his broth- 
er's back. What a pal ! Breaking in like 
that when he was trying to register with 
the swellest girl he'd ever met. As his 
gaze rested fiercely on Charlie's bent 
shoulders, he suddenly recalled that this 
was not the first time the latter had 
started him unwillingly toward a broad- 
casting studio. Four years before in 
Kansas City, when the construction 
company they owned had folded, Charlie 
had literally dragged him into an audition 
room. 

On that occasion Gene had not remained 
so mute. On the contrary, he had argued 
hotly that it was a crazy idea, this no- 
tion of Charlie's that anybody would pay 
to hear them sing cowboy ballads. The 
cowboy ballads they'd learned on their 
father's ranch in the Texas Pan Handle. 



That Gene eventually yielded was, how- 
ever, no slur upon his spinal rigidity. 
Rather does it explain, I think, why 
Marge, after spending the first eighteen 
months following their chance Maywood 
meeting convincing herself that she would 
never, never marry him, turned around 
and, at a spectacular ceremony, solemnized 
at the People's Church by that radio- 
renowned parson, Dr. Preston Bradley, 
became Mrs. Gene Kretsinger. 

Gene's spirit of compromise has gone 
far no doubt towards insuring the suc- 
cess of his and his talented wife's mar- 
riage. Nevertheless at least half the 
credit is due to Marge. 

Few married women of my acquaintance 
have met the crises of wedlock with greater 
equanimity than this dutiful daughter of 
the Middle Border who, at fourteen, quit 
High School to join the vaudeville act of 
her parents, George J. Damerel, the orig- 
inel Prince Danielo of The Merry Widow, 
and the theater-wise creator and co-star 
of "Myrt and Marge." Let me cite an 
example : 

Shortly after their marriage Marge and 
Gene determined to celebrate their first 
monthly anniversary with a week-end of 
winter sports in Wisconsin. Everything 
was all arranged but the reservations at 
the hotel where they planned to stop. So 
a couple of mornings before they were to 
leave, as Gene was leaving for the studio, 
Marge sweetly reminded him : 

"You won't forget to attend to those 
accommodations, will you?" 

"Of course not, darling." 

But when he returned home at noon, he 
sheepishly acknowledged he didn't have 
them. What had happened? Unlike his 
wife, whose air time is monopolized by a 
single sponsor, his is shared by half a 
dozen. And that morning a new one had 
entered his business life, one with a prod- 
uct he wanted aired on Thursday, Satur- 
day and Sunday mornings. 

All women know how eagerly the av- 
erage bride anticipates the anniversaries of 
her marriage. Especially the first one. 
And Marge, in spite of the divorce de- 
cree that separated her from her first 
husband, is no exception. Still she was 
sensible wife and seasoned trooper enough 
to know that business conies before 
pleasure. 

Occurring once or twice in a life-time, a 
disappointment like that might be glossed 
over without comment. But wrecked 
week-ends," like solo summer vacations, so 
Marge tells me, are the warp and woof of 
a radio-wife's life. And when that wife 
happens to be a scintillant somebody on 
her own score, the marital situation also 
becomes complicated for the husband. 

When Gene married Marge he not only 
attached to himself a career wife, he also 
acquired a popular favorite with a fan 
public that took its radio romance literally 
and regarded her as the exclusive property 
of her air lover, Jack Arnold In con- 
sequence one of the first lessons lie had to 
learn as a husband was to accommodate 
himself to this fantastic notion. 



RADIO STARS 



Two men told me 



In the first flush of romantic realiza- 
tion this was a cinch. Gene has a swell 
sense of humor and when letters began 
pouring in to his wife, berating her for 
"two-timing Jack" and "chasing around 
with that dark stranger," he laughed long 
and loudly. But gradually his notion of 
fun changed until one evening, shortly 
after Marge's microphone marriage to 
Arnold, it did a complete' somersault. 

That evening the Kretsinger s were 
seated at a table for two in a local night 
club when a pretty young thing detached 
herself from a nearby party and ap- 
proached them. Fulsomely she introduced 
herself as one of Marge's constant listen- 
ers, and begged for an autograph. Oblig- 
ingly Marge scrawled her name across 
the menu the fair stranger handed her and, 
as she returned it, graciously asked : 
"Wouldn't you like to meet my husband?" 

The girl would, of course, and, grabbing 
up a second order card, thrust it toward 
Gene, asking: "Can't I have your auto- 
graph, too?" 

Pardonably pleased, Gene signed, but his 
pleasure was short-lived. 

"Aren't — you — Jack Arnold?" demanded 
the fair stranger accusingly, her gaze fixed 
reproachfully upon his signature. 

"No. I'm Marge's real husband. Gene 
Kretsinger." 

"Ohhhhhh." 

His wife's pulchritudinous public made 
no effort to conceal her dismay and, as 
she rejoined her own party, Gene saw her 
surreptitiously slip under the white- 
clothed table the card on which was his 
John Hancock. 

Still another complication, unique to 
radio newlyweds, which temporarily threat- 
ened the connubial calm of the Kretsing- 
ers was that of leisure. Gene had to be 
at the studio by nine every morning and 
remain there intermittently until two or 
three o'clock. Marge's working day, on 
the other hand, began with her four p. m. 
rehearsal and continued with long breath- 
ing spells through her seven and ten 
o'clock broadcasts. The question, there- 
fore, of how to utilize pleasantly and 
profitably these crazy chunks of in-between 
time became a puzzler. 

The story of how they solved it is so 
typical that I think it bears repeating 
here. Although the Kretsinger menage has 
always boasted an excellent housekeeper, 
Marge is so proud of her culinary skill 
that she seldom allows anybody else to 
do the cooking. And on this day of 
which I'm about to speak she was in the 
kitchen, blissfully preparing luncheon, 
when Gene for lack of anything else to 
do wandered in. 

With the fortitude of a Spartan wife, 
Marge watched him open the oven door to 
see what was baking inside, sample the 
salted nuts for the salad, do sleight-of-hand 
tricks with her pet paring knife. But 
she said nothing. Then he started to 
mop up with one of her best linen glass 
towels some cream he'd spilled, she ex- 
ploded. 

"Gene Kretsinger!" she wailed. "Can't 
you find anything else to do besides 
wreck my kitchen?" 

"Why Cupcake, I — " Gene started to 
explain, but Marge cut him off. 

"Before we were married," she went on 
hotly, "you were the busiest man I knew. 
There were always a dozen things you had 




Jack called it 



" Wonderful gum " 

M en who are particular always like Dentyne 
I find. It has that "different" taste — spicy, 
lively, and refreshing. After trying Dentyne, 
I certainly complimented him on his good 
taste. Notice the handy, flat shape of Dentyne 
— an exclusive feature, making it convenient 
for your purse or vest pocket. 



KEEPS TEETH WHITE -MOUTH HEALTHY 



73 



RADIO STARS 



PA K K £.TILFOKD'S 



F AO 




PA K K ^TILFOKD'S 

FAOE N 

( r A Y - O N I 

IN TEN CENT TUCKAWAY SIZES AS 
ILLUSTBATED AT ALt S fc 10c STORES 



to do. Golf. Fishing. Riding. Trap-shoot- 
ing. Hunting old guns for yours and Char- 
lie's collection Wood-carving. Now you 
don't do any of those things. Don't you 
care for them any more?" 

"Don't I?" laughed Gene hollowly, and 
added: "But you don't. And that settles 
it I'm not such a heel that I'd leave you 
alone while I was off enjoying myself." 

And that brings us to the drafting of 
the Kretsingers' new design for leisure, 
the turning point in their married life. 

Only the other day as I was chatting 
with a friend at WBBM, a meteor in sports 
clothes flashed across the reception room. 
It was Marge. She had just finished re- 



hearsal and was bound for the curb out- 
side where Gene was waiting in their 
car. "We're heading for the gun club in 
Lincoln Park," she called back to me. 
"We're going to do some trap-shooting be- 
fore my broadcast." 

I mention this incident because it sum- 
marizes more eloquently than can words 
the successful working out of their own 
program of play. At the same time it 
vividly depicts the new Marge, the vivid, 
vibrant young matron of the microphone 
who, with eyes as well as actions, lets you 
know that her marriage to Gene Kret- 
singer has been for better — 110/ worse. 
The End 



on 



(Continued from page 46) 



A (fun 



operatic career — no!" 

It was a knockout punch to his hopes, 
but he bounced right back. Somewhere in 
his makeup is the refusal to concede defeat. 
It's apparent in the stocky, heavy-set frame 
of his body. At any rate, burdened down 
with the load of two heavy "don'ts," Ma- 
rio Chamlee still set out to become an 
opera star. There was no money coming 
from his well-to-do father, no encour- 
agement from the teacher, so he took on 
any job at all to pay for lessons. Sing- 
ing in a saloon one week, in a one-horse 
vaudeville act the next. How his fath- 
er's ears must have burned ! 

But he made it. In spite of a horrible 
interlude spent in the World War, he 
finally made the Metropolitan opera — the 
goal of every serious singer. Now Mario 
had his feet on the glory road. There 
followed a series of successful opera and 
concert tours. Always Chamlee's name 
was connected with the loftiest brackets 
of the musical and opera world. 

Then suddenly — his decision to co-star 
with George Frame Brown on the "Tony 
and Gus" air show ! It was the news 
which had the music crowd reeling. Opera 
star turned comedian ! His friends raised 
a horrified wail, "Don't do it! Yeu'll kill 
your reputation. You'll make a fool of 
yourself. Don't! Don't!" But Chamlee, 
who had heard this mournful chant be- 
fore, let the warnings trickle past him and 
went straight ahead. He always had an 
aptitude for dialects and he saw in this 
program not only increased money for him- 
self, but a chance to bring good music 
daily into the homes of the average radio 
listeners. And now with "Tony and Gus" 
already an established hit, and with his 
success as an actor-comedian-singer al- 
ready assured, he has gained, rather than 
lost, prestige. 

Chamlee, in spite of those Latin eyes, 
that darkly handsome face and the lyrical 
name, is not Italian but of Dutch and 
English parentage. He has been happily 
married for about fifteen years, and his 
wife is a former opera singer who gave 
up her career to bear and rear their son. 

"Will you let your wife return to the 
stage? Do you want your son to be a 
singer?" To these questions Chamlee 
laughs. "That's up to them. Who am I 
to give advice?" 

The End 



Folks" had to trot out on the stage for 
the four or five people who had con- 
veniently tucked away their money in an 
old sock. But actors had to eat. Brown's 
hands went into his own pockets to make 
up the salary. It was the first jinx to 
set off the fireworks. He had to open 
at theatres contracted for or else be sued 
by the local managers, there were actors 
to be paid, scenery to be transported. 

Hopefully he wrote his New York 
brokers for more money, but they beat 
him to it by writing for more margin. 

But back in New York, the unconquer- 
ing hero stumbled into the fact that news 
of his unfortunate tour had already hit 
the town, and he was labelled a "flop." 
Show business has no use for failures, 
whatever the reason. He tried to peddle 
some shows he had written, but the finger 
was on him. Where before he had been 
ushered into private offices of radio exec- 
utives as a star, now he found himself 
warming the chairs of the outer offices 
waiting hours for an interview. 

On the verge of bankruptcy, sick and 
harassed in spirit, he quit everything and 
fled to a little farm in Connecticut. 

At the insistence of friends, Brown at- 
tended a house-party nearby. He got into 
the swing of the fun and went into a 
comic Swedish dialect for the amuse- 
ment of the guests. One of the men in 
the crowd returned with a rapid-fire 
stream of Italian gibberish. That started 
them off and in no time at all there was 
the whole party listening in on the first 
performance of what was to be "Tony and 
Gus." The other man, of course, was his 
future radio partner, Mario Chamlee. 
Brown wrote a whole batch of "Tony and 
Gus" skits, and in one of the quickest 
deals on record, sold the idea to the Gen- 
eral Foods Corporation who now sponsors 
it every week-day evening at 7:15 over 
the NBC network. 

So there we have the happy ending of 
the "has-been" who came back. Brown 
writes the script besides playing Gus, and 
oddly enough, he looks somewhat like the 
big Swede he portrays. Big-boned, 
blondish, slow-speaking and rather phleg- 
matic. But he's not at all — phlegmatic, we 
mean. He was born in Seattle, Washing- 
ton, some forty-odd years ago, but he's 
still an "eligible". 

The End 



74 



RADIO STARS 



U/katl &kind 
(Joe @ook 

(Continued from page 43) 

Studios where we finally located him. "We 
called the place 'Pleasure Park' and we 
had the best backyard show in town. 
We charged a nickel admission right off 
the bat, when all the other kids were 
afraid to charge more than twelve pins. 
But then, we gave them their money's 
worth. 

"I used to juggle and do stunts on an 
odd-shaped wooden ball that I got for 
two bucks from the Evansville Planing 
Company. Mother bought an extra 
clothesline so we could walk tight rope 
and slack, too, even when the family wash- 
ing was out. Once we needed piping for 
a trapeze frame, so we sneaked over to 
the gas plant and hooked some that was 
lying around loose. A cop caught us but 
we didn't care because the chief was one 
of our best customers. 'Leave those kids 
alone,' he said. 'They're O. K. and I'm 
for them.' " 

Joe likes to boast of his juvenile per- 
formances in the show business, but he 
never talks about the real difficulties of 
those early days. Yet the silent, unseen 
progress of childhood gliding into youth 
did not bring with it a life of ease for 
him. He worked every night after 
school, driving a delivery wagon for a 
department store, for two dollars a week. 
He'd like to make one think that was 
more fun than work. 

"A man came to town and established a 
baking department in the basement of the 
store," he says. "I never had tasted any- 
thing but chocolate cake at home, so 
when I delivered my first angel food I 
turned it over and scooped out just a little 
bit at first — and then a little more, until I 
finally delivered the shell. That lady 
never reported it, so I got a little bolder; 
the next time it was a lemon meringue 
pie, and I just ate it all and signed her 
name to the slip. This time I was fired. 

"On the way home I passed 'Dr. John- 
son's Elixir of Life Company', a travel- 
ing medicine show that had stopped to 
water the horses. The old Doc had 
twenty-dollar gold pieces for buttons on 
his coat, and ten-dollar gold pieces on 
his sleeves. His remedy was supposed to 
be an old Indian herb secret. Actually, it 
wasn't much more than quinine mixed 
with whiskey. Anyway, he took me alono- 
because I could drive the wagon and do 
three good acts on the buckboard. When 
I quit at the end of the week he called 
me over and said : 

'"You're a fine fellow, Joe, and I'm 
going to be very generous with you I 
get a* dollar a bottle for this medicine 
and I'm going to give you not two bottles 
for the two dollars I owe von, but seven ' 

"I was spellbound, I believed so in the 
darn' stuff. I left the tent show dizzy 
with success, with seven Elixirs of Life 
clutched to my chest. That was my real 
initiation into the art of show, business I 
went proudly home, but Mother didn't 
seem to be much impressed with the Elixir 
. . . Not long after this, my brother Leo 



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75 



RADIO STARS 



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and I started to try to crash New York." 

Two orphans trying to battle Broad- 
way ! The little money they had was in- 
vested immediately in a second-hand jug- 
gler's table with a green-spangled top and 
a runner of glistening red sequins spell- 
ing out the name "Cook Brothers." But 
even with accoutrement such as this, the 
Great White Way wasn't extending 
open arms and jobs for two kids under 
fifteen years old from the corn husking 
country. 

They slept in packing boxes along Thir- 
teenth Street rather than return to Evans- 
ville admitting failure. They could have 
pawned their table for a meal but with 
stomachs hollow and minds determined 
they still clung desperately to their props. 
They walked miles to save a nickel, they 
did odd jobs in restaurants and stores in 
return for food or rehearsal space in some 
cluttered back room. 

After two years of this they were ready 
— ready to become amateurs. At a bur- 
lesque house on Eighth Avenue the Cook 
Brothers put on their first "strong man 
and juggling act" on Amateur Night. But 
the callous audience wasn't interested in 
Indian clubs and bouncing balls. They 
knew nothing of the two long years of 
suffering and privation as they hissed the 
Cook Brothers off the stage to bring on 
five minutes sooner the twenty girls with 
rouged and dimpled knees. 

"We cried a lot, but we didn't give 
up. And we took in another fellow 
named Curly, who had been hissed off, 
too. Curly could get us three stiff white 
shirts for the act because his father was 
head waiter at the Hoffman House. Four 
months later we all went back to the same 
theatre and they hollered 'ringers' at us, 
thinking we were too good to be amateurs. 
But when they held the prize up over our 
heads it was the Cook Brothers who got 
the most applause and came in for the 
ten bucks offered as first money. And," he 
winked and reached for a cigarette, "we 
played amateur shows from the Bowery 
to the Bronx after that. A skinny little 
tap dancer known as George White and 
a gawky Jewish girl named Fanny Brice 
and — oh, lots of other people you hear a 
little bit about today, were amateurs right 
along with us." 

The boys didn't always get first money, 
but Joe had a trick by which they al- 
days got some money. When Leo was in 
the spotlight, Joe would manage to reach 
into his own pocket and get out a few 
pennies and throw them over his shoul- 
der. "Sort of a decoy," he explains. "Some- 
body would always bite, and after that the 
mob spirit would take care of us." 

When there was no shower of coins 
and they were hungry, the three boys 
would walk past Bowery saloons where 
free lunch was served. Joe and Leo were 
obviously too young to partake, so they 
waited outside while the taller and more 
mature Curly would swagger in, to re- 
turn with his arms full of ham, tongue, 
cheese and sardinc-on-rye sandwiches. 

"One night very late we were scuttling 
up the Bowery, lugging our heavy valise 
filled with Indian clubs, when a police- 
man saw us. Fven when Curly unpinned 
from his undershirt the ten-dollar bill we 
had just won, the cop wouldn't believe 
we hadn't stolen both the clubs and the 
money. But we must have looked pretty 
honest because he unlocked a barber shop 



and told us to do our act if we weren't 
lying. We sprang into our finest tya-da 
position ; the clubs gleamed green and 
crimson as they flashed back and forth. 
We outdid ourselves, and when we fin- 
ished the cop gave us two bits apiece and 
told us to send him some free tickets if 
we ever got a job that wasn't 'amachoor.' " 
Reaching Curly's house, they had little 
chance to say good-night and divide the 
spoils before a stern, myopic father 
grabbed his son by the shoulder. How, 
he demanded, could he do his work at the 
Hoffman House when his three best shirts 
were appearing in a juggling act at 
some Bowery theatre? It was high time 
for Curly to quit this foolishness and get 
a regular job as a waiter, or else get out 
of his house. The Cook Brothers waited 
outside in the bleak shadows of the cor- 
ner gas light while Curly packed his two 
handkerchiefs and tooth brush. Joe and 
Leo took him home to their room, where 
he slept on the floor — but he didn't sleep 
much. 

"Two days later we worked at the Al- 
cazar in Brooklyn. Curly kept dozing off 
on every piece of furniture backstage. I 
warned him for the last time to stay 
awake, just as our act went on. Leo and 
I were juggling away as if our lives de- 
pented on it. 'Right!' I yelled. This was ■ 
the signal for Curly to start his part of 
the routine. Nothing happened. 'Right!' 
I repeated. 'Right, right, right!' By now 
the audience was roaring. I looked around 
to see what they were laughing at, and 
there was Curly, fast asleep on a divan in 
front of the whole house!" 

The Cook Brothers certainly weren't in 
the money that night. When the act was 
over they carried their snoring compan- 
ion from the stage. In the dismal hall 
room they held a candlelight conference 
that lasted until the early morning hours, 
when Curly shuffled docilely toward home 
to tell his father that he was ready to 
leave the theatre and be a waiter. 

The next afternoon when Joe and Leo 
returned to the Alcazar to retrieve their 
spangled table they were greeted by good- 
natured laughter from the professionals 
on the bill. ''But among the jeers and 
smiles there was one who had a heart of 
gold," Joe says, "and she was Elsie 
Janis. She had suddenly grown quite 
hungry, but she didn't feel like eating if 
we wouldn't accompany her to lunch — as 
her guests, of course." 

After that first meal the three got 
along famously. Smothered laughter 
echoed from behind the closed doors of 
her dressing-room as Elsie Janis planned 
a career for two boys who years before 
had worshipped her from a hard-earned 
gallery seat in an Evansville theatre. 
Stories of the lean and lively years which 
she coaxed from them were soon forgot- 
ten in tales of breathless feats of juggling. 
Her personal agent, Jack Levy, the best 
in the business at that time, might not 
have believed Joe if he had come in 
alone ; he might not have believed Elsie 
Janis if she had not told him about the 
act. But from beneath the spangled 
table top Joe procured a photograph 
which pictured him juggling, balancing 
sixteen balls in the air at once time. 
(When he left with a contract in his 
pocket, Joe still neglected to tell Elsie or 
her agent that a kindly photographer had 
painted out the wire on which the six- 



76 



teen balls were strung!) 

When he stepped on the stage for his 
first non-amateur performance it may 
seem incredible but Joe Cook's props were 
lost in transit. Those sixteen spectacular 
balls could not be found anywhere. So he 
began to talk. He started with a de- 
scription of his great sorrow that he was 
unable to show the audience his brilliant 
prowess as a juggler, ending with a rapid, 
ludicrous narrative which left his hear- 
ers weak from laughter. 

But he was a success. Engagements in 
small-time vaudeville, amusement parks 
and tent shows followed rapidly. He never 
had a lay-off. And he emerged as one of 
the biggest one-man shows on the vaude- 
ville stage. Everyone yielded to the 
breathless spell of his very human antics. 
He could quietly, unsmilingly, go through 
an incredible act of wire-walking, jug- 
gling, fiddling or master yarn-spinning 
and "bring down the house." 

Backstage it was the same. Actors and 
actresses never seemed to leave theatres 
between shows when he was on the bill ; 
they could always be found with the boys 
from the corner barber shop, sitting in 
Joe Cook's dressing-room, listening to 
ghost stories that first found hearers in an 
Indiana hayloft. Every hardship Joe 
has known he can laugh away — but one. 
And that one hangs heavy above his head. 
His brother Leo's death caused Joe to 
shut himself away from friends, man- 
agers, critics, and to give up the theatre. 

He hid from the plague of comedy he 
had created. He could be found at home, 
spending quiet evenings with his family 
— playing billiards with his sons, or 
swimming far out into the lake with his 
daughter, or making up stories about be- 
ing the youngest drummer boy in the 
Civil War, when friends dropped in for 
dinner; but when bedtime came it was he 
who laid aside his levity and carried the 
weary children in his arms to bed. 

When Earl Carroll motored out to Lake 
Hopatcong, to "Sleepless Hollow," where 
Joe lives, he expected to be met by liveried 
footmen two miles down the road, or to 
talk into a telephone which squirted water 
into his face. He anticipated being made 
uncomfortable by any number of weird 
inventions and goofy contraptions, of 
which he had heard so much gossip. But 
when he yanked at the bell-pull of the 
panelled front door a friendly porch light 
winked on above his head, and his friend 
led him into the serenity of a quiet house, 
where a huge log burned hospitably in an 
open grate. 

For friendship's sake Joe emerged 
from his retirement. To please Earl Car- 
roll he went back to Broadway, co-starred 
with Peggy Hopkins Joyce, a girl whom 
he termed "that somewhat different vir- 
gin making her professional debut." His 
long absence from footlights had only 
caused his fame to burn more brightly. 
Broadway recognized him as a comedy 
genius, in a class with their beloved Char- 
lie Chaplin. Crowds overfilled his dress- 
ing-room after each performance — happy 
people glad to see him back. 

Among those many well-wishers there 
were always a few who had come to ask 
for help. Joe Cook could be a very rich 
man today if he had ever succeeded in aban- 
doning his custom of giving money to 
everyone who asks. Then came the dis- 
ordered, panicky days of 1929. So that 



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77 



RADIO STARS 



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one chill October evening in 1933, when 
Joe Cook entered the NBC studios for 
his first broadcast, he was a comparatively 
poor man. 

"When I barged into this broadcasting 
businesss the only thing that felt queer 
was keeping still before the mike," he 
told me today. "I tried tap dancing; it 
made too much noise. I favored tight- 
rope walking, but NBC officials said that 
would require too much temporary en- 
gineering, whatever that is. So I picked 
up my rolling ball and stood on that. I 
had to give them six rehearsals before 
they believed I could stay in front of the 
mike on it. I guess Roosevelt had the 
same trouble building confidence in Huey 
Long." 

He had overcome sadness by making 
others happy, now on the radio as on the 
stage he played, as his brother Leo would 
have liked, to the kids in the gallery. 
Crowds of small boys follow him down 
Broadway in New York, or Main Street 
in Evansville, until he feels like the 
Pied Piper. In his wide black hat — and 
there is no black hat in the world quite 



like Joe Cook's — he seems like a padre 
striding through his neighborhood toward 
church. Everyone knows and loves him, 
not because he is a clown but because 
he is still the country boy, the barefoot 
orphan who became an idol and still re- 
mains the salt of Broadway's earth. 

I have watched him broadcast in his 
circus serial with B. A. Rolfe, forget- 
ting always that he is in the studio, play- 
ing only to an imaginary gallery of chuck- 
ling children. And I thought it was 
grand. I have seen him stop to give a 
generous hand-out to a clown of lesser 
talent and nearly miss a train which car- 
ried him to dine with the President. I 
thought that was grand. 

But the grandest thing I ever saw was 
Joe Cook standing on the edge of Lake 
Hopatcong, clicking Indian clubs with his 
eleven-year-old son, Leo. The clubs 
glittered in the bright sunlight ; but all 
the brightness and kindliness in the world 
seemed concentrated in the eyes of that 
man and boy. 

The End 



~TliQLt Studio ' ± on the Stteet 



{Continued from page 13) 



Husing walked a lapel microphone into 
the pre-Election crowds on Madison Ave- 
nue and asked just one question: "For 
whom are you going to vote?" 

In Houston, Messrs. Belcher and 
Johnson heard this interesting experiment 
and decided to do something on their 
own. They didn't have a lapel mike but 
they had a pair of old carbon ones that 
had stood up through many a sports 
broadcast. They marched their mikes into 
the open and pitched camp at a busy street 
corner. In no time at all a crowd had 
gathered, curious, unaware that it was 
seeing the birth of a bright idea. 

Red-headed Jerry Belcher asked the 
first question. Got a giggle. Not serious 
questions about politics or religion, but 
about little things out of which our lives 
are fashioned. 

"When- you go through a revolv- 
ing door, do you try to ride through 
on somebody else's push?" 

"If you wake up in the morning and 
you find the button off your shirt col- 
lar, zvhat do you do?" 

"When you spend a night out, what 
do you tell your wife the next. day?" 
Houston is a neighborly city, and many 
of its citizens know each other. Hearing 
your friends and acquaintances on the 
radio doing their dogged best became the 
town's favorite indoor sport. 

One night a prominent rancher was 
called to the mike and asked: "You've seen 
coivs, haven't you?" 

"Sure, sure." He was certain of his 
ground. "I milked eight of 'em every 
morning for ten years." 

"Then, speaking as an authority on cows, 
are her horns in front of or behind her 
ears?" 

"They're . . . they're in front ... no! 
They're behind. No, they're in front." 

The poor fellow, for all his ten years of 
intimacy with cows, couldn't tell where 
their horns were. He is still trying to live 
it down. 



These brash young men from Texas 
need their wits about them, you may be 
sure of that. Usually, they need their 
wits about them when they interview 
one of those remarkable female creatures 
best described as a "sweet young thing." 
Parks Johnson brought one to the mike 
one warm evening and breezed through a 
bright half-dozen questions. It was just 
before Christmas and he thought to top 
off the session with a jolly: "What do 
you want for Christmas?" 

The sweet young thing hesitated and 
Parks repeated: "What do you want for 
Christmas?" 

She looked him full in the face and 
said: "You!" 

Well, my dear, what does a modest, 
married man say under those conditions. 

Or these? 

Jerry Belcher had a debutante on his 
elbow. "What's your name?" 
She gave it. 
"Your address?" 
She gave it. 

"What country is Ethiopia in?" 

She took a breath and Jerry was al- 
ready thinking of his next question when 
his astounded ears heard her say : 

"Mr. Belcher, what beautiful brown 
eyes you have." 

He hastened into: "// you divided an ap- 
ple in half and gave me the biggest piece, 
how much ..." 

"What beautiful big, brown eyes you 
have !" 

Parks Johnson was nearby with another 
subject ready. Jerry saw him. "Help, 
Parks ! Come and get me," he said not 
very brightly, dragging the young lady 
away from the mike. 

And that was that, so far as the broad- 
cast was concerned. But every time Jerry 
Belcher tried to get serious with anyone 
for the next six months, at home, at 
business, or at play, the answer he always 
got was: "What beautiful brown eyes you 
have!" 



78 



RADIO STARS 



Before these boys could put their show 
on a network they had to convince broad- 
casting officials of just one thing. That 
they could keep it clean. With an open 
mike in a catch-as-catch-can crowd, some- 
body would surely be tempted to spill a 
swear-word or so. Up to date, just one 
little damn has got out. 

When queried why, they explained that 
the questionee was too busy trying to an- 
swer to think up any mischief. Try it 
yourself : 

"Should a ship's captain always go 
down with his ship?" 
"Where is Singapore?" 
"Can you describe the wall paper on 
your bedroom walls?" 
"Can a chicken swim?" 
"If you bought a horse for seventy 
dollars and sold him for eighty, then 
bought him back for ninety and sold 
him again for one hundred dollars, 
would you make or lose money?" 
Yes, indeed, you're much too busy for 
profane thoughts, especially when the 
world is waiting for you to give the 
wrong answer. But if it is wrong, you'll 
never learn of it from Messrs. Johnson and 
Belcher. They're too kind — and too canny 
— -to infer that they are smarter than any 
single one of their sidewalk geniuses. 
The End 



Soutltetn HelL 



on 



way 

(Continued from page 37) 

era ladies and gentlemen. You meet her, 
too, amid circumstances far removed 
from those of her native setting. For 
Helen Claire, too, drums summon to bat- 
tle for her ideals, while roses whisper of 
romance. And through it all she, too, is 
undeniably the little Southern lady. 

Being by choice an actress, she can 
and does play many parts. She has cre- 
ated notably successful roles on the 
Broadway stage and in Summer Stock 
companies. But the type to which she 
was shaped by generations of her fore- 
bears is neither altered nor eradicated. 

Helen Claire was born and grew up 
in the little town of Union Springs, Ala- 
bama — a town of approximately five 
thousand people. Her father owns plan- 
tations and other property. She is an only 
child. She went to school and college 
in the South, graduating from Randolph 
Macon college with a degree and a Phi 
Beta Kappa key. 

And, having finished her schooling, the 
natural expectation was that Helen would 
marry one of her young suitors and make 
a home according to tradition. The suitor 
was ready and Waiting. In fact he, and 
dozens of his ilk, had long been saying 
it with flowers, whispering it in impas- 
sioned words, " 'neath the Southern moon, 
where love is warm and tender." 

Southern girls mature early. "I had 
my first serious romance at twelve," Helen 
confessed, with a twinkling smile and 
softly glowing eyes. 

But romance was as familiar, as nat- 
ural as breathing. Helen Claire needed 
more to challenge her mettle. The 




(but the person she cheats is herself ^ 



SHE cheats herself out of good 
times, good friends, good jobs — 
perhaps even out of a good marriage. 

And all because she is careless! 
Or, unbelievable as it is, because 
she has never discovered this fact: 
That socially refined people never 
welcome a girl who offends with the 
unpleasant odor of underarm per- 
spiration on her person and clothing. 

There's little excuse for it these 
days. For there's a quick, easy way 
to keep your underarms fresh, free 
from odor all day long. Mum! 



It takes just half a minute to use 
Mum. And you can use it any time 
— even after you're dressed. It's 
harmless to clothing. 

You can shave your underarms 
and use Mum at once. It's so sooth- 
ing and cooling to the skin! 

Always count on Mum to prevent 
the odor of underarm perspiration, 
without affecting perspiration itself. 
Don't cheat yourself! Get the daily 
Mum habit. Bristol-Myers, Inc., 75 
West St., New York. 




MUM TAKES THE ODOR 
OUT OF PERSPIRATION 



ANOTHER WAY MUM HELPS is on sanitary napkins. Don't worry about this cause of 
unpleasantness any more. Use Mum! 

79 



RADIO STARS 




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base. . . . Accept no substitute. 

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MASS11LON. OHIO 



THE ORIGINAL DRIP-O-LATOR is displayed 
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80 



world beyond Union Springs was thrilling 
and strange and alluring. There were 
dangers to be met and mastered. There 
were careers' to be achieved. 

Helen Claire wanted a career. She 
wanted to be an actress. 

She came to New York. Not with gilt- 
edged introductions to open friendly doors, 
but with the dower of ability and cour- 
age. With self-reliance, and with pride. 
And she took whatever work was offered, 
to help her along her chosen way. She 
was a good Settlement worker. A good 
waitress. A good usher. And she be- 
came a good actress. Whatever Helen 
Claire does is well done, with intelli- 
gence and with an ingrained passion for 
perfection. Summer Stock companies 
gave her invaluable experience toward 
achieving her desired career on the stage. 
And a trained and eager mind taught her 
how to use it. 

And, as she went along, there were 
so many new and interesting experiences. 
And amusing ones. That time, for in- 
stance, when, with a company starring 
Henry Hull, they played "Springtime for 
Henry" in a factory town near Boston, 
for audiences that missed the subtle 
comedy and wondered, in dwindling num- 
bers, what it was all about. So that, at 
the end of a week's engagement, they 
found themselves minus salaries and ow- 
ing the theatre management eighty-five 
dollars ! 

Or that time when she played on 
Broadway in "Jezebel," under the man- 
agement of Guthrie McClintic, and — the 
only Southerner in the cast — was chosen 
for the role of the only Northerner in the 
play ! 

"I didn't tell Mr. McClintic till it was 
too late to fire me," Helen said, with 
her merry smile. "Then he laughed, and 
said, 'There's an example of true type 
casting!' " 

Then one day Helen decided to seek 
an audition for radio work. The audi- 
tion was successful, and shortly after- 
ward she was assigned the stellar role in 
Roses and Drums — a role which she has 
admirably filled during the four years that 
this war drama has been on the air. 

Hitherto Roses and Drums has closed 
during the summer months and Helen 
has gained increasing acting experience 
in the out-of-town stock companies. But 
this year the program continued without 
break throughout the summer, so Summer 
Stock lost one of its loyal recruits. 

But with all her gratifying success, 
Helen Claire remains an unspoiled and 
charming young person. Poised, but nat- 
ural. She wears no make-up. She 
dresses simply and in quiet taste. Her 
voice is low and pleasantly modulated. 
And she has blue eyes and softly curling 
blonde hair. 

There is, in her conversation, one 
noticeable lack — the absence of the pro- 
noun A most refreshing and un- 
expected lack of egotism! There speaks 
the Southern lady— not the career girl. 

And Helen Claire, whether or not she 
realizes it herself as yet, is truly the 
Southern belle, and not the career girl. 
However successful she may be, she is 
not selfish enough to insist upon the 
career at any cost. With a nice sense of 
values, she will reckon the proportionate 
worth of the elements that-* enter into a 
balanced way of living. And her life 



will be a happily rounded one, with the 
career of her choice . conditioned by the 
standards to which she was born. 

In proof of this is the fact that though 
she came to New York to make her own 
way, she did not break with her family, 
nor did they indignantly cast her off. At 
least every week she writes long letters 
home. And from home come letters even 
oftener. Sometimes daily. Last Christ- 
mas she was given a few days' vacation 
between performances, and she hurried 
home to spend it with her family. Re- 
cently her father and mother came north 
to visit her. 

Southern heaus, too, come north to 
pursue their interrupted romance. North- 
ern sweethearts are ardent in their ef- 
forts to convince her that a northerner 
would make a good husband. And, se- 
cretly, Helen is beginning to think that 
a certain one would ! 

But for the time being she continues 
to find the career all that she hoped it 
would he. She enjoys her work as star of 
Roses and Drums. She likes to study the 
technical problems of broadcasting. She 
looks forward to the new developments to 
come in radio drama, with plays written 
definitely for the radio and employing a 
technique better suited to its needs than 
are stage plays. She studies the art and 
mechanics of voice production, and lis- 
tens with an eager ear for anything in 
even the casual conversation of passers-by 
that may aid her in her work. 

This ambitious young person also is 
a successful writer. You undoubtedly 
have listened to many a radio program 
for which Helen Claire has written the en- 
tertaining script. Acting, however, re- 
mains her first love, the writing of 
secondary interest. 

Books are her friends. Though you 
need meet her but once to know- that she 
is not dependent for companionship upon 
books alone. She is however an avid 
reader, with biography her favorite field 
of exploration. Just now she is reading 
the life of General Lee. 

But acting, broadcasting, writing and 
reading do not occupy all her time, nor 
all her active mind. Helen loves to 
swim. She plays a good game of golf. 
And she is, as one would expect of a 
girl who grew up on a spacious South- 
ern estate, a lover of horses and an ex- 
pert horsewoman. In the city, however, 
she prefers the car, with long drives into 
the country for recreation and refresh- 
ment. 

Her apartment in New York is charm- 
ingly furnished with things from her own 
home in the South, providing the famil- 
iar atmosphere and background which she 
loves. Another proof that roots deeply 
sunk in tradition are not easily trans- 
planted. 

"Wherever I live, of course I always will 
have my permanent home in the South," 
Helen says. 

With her costume for the role of Betty 
Graham, Helen Claire wears about her 
neck a miniature of her Southern grand- 
mother. And, looking at it, you will be 
struck by the resemblance between the 
two. Perhaps that grandmother, too, de- 
fied tradition in her own way, and handed 
on to her little granddaughter the glow- 
ing torch of individual adventure and 
achievement. 

So our Southern belle on Broadway 



RADIO STARS 



THE AVERAGE CHILD NEEDS ONE QUART OF MILK 

PER DAY Jvl nrtmafl <ffow$i arid (^nJ^matit'' 



H. C. SHERMAN, Ph D , Sc. D. 

"CHEMISTRY OF FOOD AND NUTRITION 
courtesy of MacMillan Company 




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provides aCmoJt 'tunce. the 

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■ plays her role with dual success, on the 
Istage and in her personal life. Clever 
land talented actress, and lovely lady. 

Nevertheless we believe that she is in- 
Ihcrently the home girl and not the career 

■ girl. So perhaps when Betty Graham 
decides between Randy and Gordon, the 
Southern and Northern Captains. Helen 
Claire, too, will come to a decision that 
will make one man happy — and direct her 
career along new lines, and with equally 
gratifying success. 

The End 

She (}ot What 
I She Wanted 

(Continued from page 34) 

I • 

I while Virginia Bruce played the role of 
I Jenny Lind, Francia was selected to do 
I the voice doubling for her. And that 
started everything ! 

If you saw that picture you must have 
j marvelled at how perfectly Miss Bruce 
played, and apparently sang, her role of 
the immortal Lind. Over in New York 
an advertising executive saw the picture 
and rushed a wire to the Coast: "Get 
Virginia Bruce as singer for my nezv 
radio program. Must have her at any 
price." 

But when he finally got a record of Miss 
Bruce's voice, a look of disappointment 
settled on his face. It was not the Lind 
voice he had heard! 

He promptly forgot about the matter 
j and went about looking for another 
singer. Meanwhile Francia, who knew 
nothing about this comedy of errors, hung 
around the movie lots looking for more 
work and prayed for an opportunity to 
get her Big Chance. And here was the 
B. C. being shuffled around in a mass of 
mistaken identities. 

Well, like the climax of a mellerdrama, 
the program was just about to go on 
with another singer, leaving our heroine 
out in the cold, when a Hollywood agent 
suddenly remembered little Miss White 
and shot a wire to New York to hold 
everything. 

Everything was held. Francia grabbed 
her toothbrush and hopped a plane, hit 
New York and got the job. It was as 
Barbara Haydn in "Music at the Haydns'," 
and the first step in a sensational radio 
career. Since then, she's taken over Gladys 
Swarthout's much-fought-over place on 
the Palmolive operettas and — listen to 
this — the movies are after her now ! 
They're going to employ their photographic 
magic to eliminate that teeny bump. 

And, oh, yes, in the excitement and 
rush of dashing to New York, one per- 
fectly good California boy friend was lost. 
He had objected violently to Francia's leav- 
ing the Coast to go on a wild chase half- 
way across the continent "just for a 
career." A year ago that loss would 
have worried Francia, but looking back 
at the dizzy, unplanned workings of her 
career, she dismisses it with a toss of 
her sleek brown head — "It was meant to 
be that way, I guess. Fate must have 
different plans in store for me, as far as 
love goes." 

The End 



DOCTORS, dieticians, pediatricians agree 
that growing children need a quart of 
milk a day. For milk gives the most valu- 
able nourishment for strong bones, sound 
teeth, straight legs and active muscles. 

Unfortunately, many children do not re- 
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diet — eithet because they dislike milk — or 
because a quart a day, every day, soon be- 
comes monotonous. 

Doubly valuable, therefore, to growing 
children is Cocomalt. For not only does 
Cocomalt make milk delicious, but made 
as directed, it almost DOUBLES the food- 
energy value of every glass or cup of milk. 

Add S vital food essentials 

Cocomalt is rich in five important food 
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valuable proteins that help replace used or 



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flesh and muscle. It supplies extra food- 
calcium, food-phosphorus and Sunshine 
Vitamin D for the formation of strong 
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Doctors advise busy adults and convales- 
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to induce restful sleep. Cocomalt taken hot 
at bedtime helps you to sleep soundly. 

Cocomalt is sold at grocery, drug and de- 
partment stores in '/2-lb. and 1-lb. air-tight 
cans. Also in the economical 5-lb. hospital 
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with milk— delicious HOT or COLD. 

Special Trial Offer: For a trial-size can of 
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Prepared as directed, odds 70 c l 
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by an exclusive process under scientific control. Cocomalt i? romposeH of sucrose. =kim milk, 
selected cocoa, barley malt extract , flavoring and added Sunshine Vitamin D. ( Irradiated ergosterol. ) 



81 



RADIO STARS 



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(Continued from page 58) 



SUNDAYS (Continued) 



KFPY. 
WBNS, 
WDSU. 
WOWO. 
6:30 EDST 



WGST, WBT. 
WREC, WCCO, 
CFRB, KFAB, 



KWG, KVI, 
KRLD, KLZ, 
WHEC, KSL. 

KOMA. , . „ 

^ (y 2 )_Grand- Hotel. Anne Sey- 
mour and Don Ameche. (Campana Co ) 

WJZ WBAL WMAL, WBZ, WBZA. 
WSYR, WHAM, KDKA. WJR, WBNR, 
KSO. WCKY, KWK. W'REN KOIL. 
KSTP WEBC, KOA, KDYL, KPO, RFI, 
KGW. KOMO, KHQ. WMT 
6:30 EDST (%) — Smilin' Ed McConnell. 
Songs. (Acme Paints.) 
WABC, WKBW, WDRC, 
CKLW, WCAU, WJAS, 
WHAS, KMOX, WCCO. 
6:45 EDST (%) — Voice 
(Wasey Products.) 
WABC. WADC, WCAO, 
WBBM, WKRC, WHK. 
WFBM, KMBC, WHAS, 
WEAN, KMOX, WFBL 
WCCO, WHEC. WWVA 



WAAB. WKRC, 
WJSV, WBBM, 
WEAN. WFBL. 
of Experience. 

WNAC. WKBW. 
CKLW, WDRC. 
WCAU, WJAS, 
WSPD, WBT, 



7:00 EDST (y 2 )— Lanny Ross' State Fair 
Concert— featuring guest stars. Howard 
Barlow's Concert Orchestra. 

NBC Service to WJZ, W BAL, 
WAPI. WFIL. WBZ. WBZA, 
KDKA, WJR, WIRE. 
KSO, KWK, WREN, 
WEBC. KFYR. 
WIOD, WFLA, 
WSB. WKY, 
KPRC, WOAI, 
WCKY, KSTP. 



WHAM 
WMT, 
WTMJ, 
WPTF, 
WAVE, 
KVOO, 
WSOC. 
WMC, 



W T IBA, 
WJAX, 
, WSM, 
KTBS, 
W'DAY, 
WBAP. 



WMAL. 
WSYR. 
WENR, 
KOIL. 
WRYA, 
WTAR, 
WSMB. 
WGAR. 
KTHS, 



WMAL, 
WGAR, 
KWK, 



:30 EDST (%)— The Voice of the People 

sidewalk interviews conducted by Jerrj 

Belcher and Parks Johnson, newspaper- 
NBC Service to WJZ, WBAL. 
WBZ. WBZA, WHAM, KDKA 
WJR. WCKY. WLS. WMT, KSO, 

WREN, KOIL, WSYR. . 

7-30 EDST (»4) — Fireside Recitals. Sigurd 
Nillsen, balso; Hardest? Johnson, tenor; 
Graham McNamee, commentator. (Amer- 

^E n AF ad WT°A r G C WJAR. WCSH. WFBR. 
WRC ' WGY WBEN, WW J. WCAE. 
VTAM, WSAI. WMAQ. WOW WTIC. 
WHIO, KYW. WIRE, WDAF, KSD. 
7-45 EDST (V4) — Sunset Dreams — Morin 
Sisters and the Ranch Boys. 

WTAG, WJAR. WCSH, 
WGY, WBEN. WCAE. 
WLW, CFCF, WTIC, 
KSD, KYW. WOW, 



WEAF, 
WRC, 
WW.T, 
WMAQ, 
WIRE. 
:00 



(Fitch.) 

WFBR. 
WT AM. 
WHO. 
WHIO, 



Amateur 



WCAE, 

CFCF, 

WRC. 

WRVA. 

WTMJ, 

WJDX, 

KPRC, 

KVOO, 



WWJ. 
CRCT. 
WJAR, 
WMAQ 
WOW. 
WDAF, 
WEBC, 
WAVE 



WBEN, 
WLW. 
WFBR. 
WCSH. 
WSM, 
WMC. 
KYW. 
WDAY, 
KTAR. 
KOMO. 
WBZ, 



WHP 

WBNS, 

WKRC, 

WDAE, 

WFEA, 

KLRA, 

KWKH 

WAC( i, 



WADC, 
WCAO, 
W M A S. 
WDBO, 
WHK. 
KRLD, 

, WNOX. 
WBRC. 



WKBN, 

W.I AS. 

WSPD. 
WFBL. 
CKLW. 

WSBT. 

WTOC. 

WGST. 




KWK. WREN 
Ubum of Fam- 



WCAO, 
WBNS, 
WFBL. 
WBBM, 
KRLD, 
KM J. 



WEAF, WTAG, WEEI, WJAR, WPTF. 
WCSH. WFBR, WWNC. WRC. WGY. 
WBEN, WCAE. WTAM. WWJ, WSAI, 
WSB. WIOD, WFLA. WRVA, WJAX. 
CFCF, CRCT. WIS. WMAQ. WHO, KSD, 
KYW. WSM, WOW, WMC. WOAI, 
WJDX, WFAA, WSMB, WKY, KPRC, 
WDAF. WTMJ, KSTP. KDYL, 
KFI. KGW. KOMO, KHQ. KPO. 
10:00 EDST (y 2 ) — AVayne King. 
Esther.) 

WABC. WADC. WOKO, 
WKBW, WKRC, WHK. 
WDRC, WCAU, WJAS, 
WJSV. WFBM, KMOX, 
WHAS. WDSU. WCCO, 
KFAB. KSL. KLZ. KERN. 
KHJ. KFBK, KGB, KFRC. 
KFPY. KWG. KVI. 

10:00 EDST (1) — Uncle Charlie's Ivory Tent 
Show. Original musical comedy starring 
Charles Winninger, Lois Bennett, Conrad 
Thibault. Jack and Loretta Clemens with 
Don Voorhees and his orchestra. (Proc- 
tor and Gamble Co.) 
WEAF, WTIC, WTAG, WCSH, 
WFBR, WRC, WGY, WBEN, 
WTAM, WWJ, WLW. WMAQ, 
WOW. WDAF, WTMJ, WIBA, 
WEBC, WDAY, KFYR, KOA. 
KDYL, KFI, KGW, KOMO. 
WEEI, WJAR, KSD. 

11:00 EDST (%) — Sunset Dreams — Morin 
Sisters and the Ranch Boys. 
WOAI, KTHS, WDAF. WKY, KPRC. 
WBAP, KTBS, KOA. KDYL. KPO. KFL 
KGW. KOMO. KHQ. KFSD. KTAR. 
11:15 EDST (%>— Cornelia Otis Skinner. The 
Jergens Program. 

KOA. KDYL, KGIR, KGHL, KPO. KFI. 
KGW. KOMO. KHQ. KFSD. KTAR 
11:30 EDST (M>) — to 12:00 Mid. Lanny 
Ross' State Fair Concert featuring Helen 
Ooelheim, contralto, and Howard Bar- 
low's Concert Orchestra. 

NBC Service to KDYL, KTAR, KFSD. 
KOA. KGIR. KGHL, KPO, KFI, KGW, 
KOMO, KHQ, KGU. 
12:00 EDST (Vs> — The Silken Strings Pro- 
gram. Charles Previn and his orchestra. 
KOA, KDYL, KPO, KFI. KGW. KOMO. 

KHQ. MONDAYS 

(Sept. 2nd, 9th. 16th, 23rd and 30th) 



KOA, 
WHIO. 
(Lady 

WAAB. 
CKLW. 
WSPD. 
KMBC, 
WIBW. 
KOIN, 
KDB. KOL. 



KYW, 
WCAE. 
WHO. 
KSTP. 
KPO. 
KHQ. 



FDST (1) — Major Bowes' 
Hour. (Standard Brands, Inc.) 

WEAF, WTIC, WTAG, WTAM, 
W T IOD, WFLA 
WWNC, WIS, 
WGY. WPTF, 
WJAX, WSB, 
KFYR. WOAI 
KSD, WHO. 
WKY. KSTP. 
WFAA. WSMB. 
KDYL. KOA. KFI. KGW. KPO. 
KHQ. KTHS, WAPI. WTAR, 

s-3(T B FDST (Vz) — ©"M Headliners with 
James Melton, tenor: K.wl.rs Quartet; 
Hallie Stiles, soprano; Pickens Sisters 
and Frank Tours' Orchestra. 
WABC WJSV. WWVA. WCOA. 
WSMK, WDNC, WS.TS, WESG, WICC 
WBIG, WBT. 
WCAU. WHEC. 
WNAC, WORC. 
WDRC, WEAN. 
WLBZ, WQAM, 
KTRH. WALA. 
WFBM, KTSA, 
WDOD, WDSU, 
WHAS'. WLAC. WMBR. WREC. WOKO. 
WDBJ. WSFA. WOWO, WGR. 
q-00 EDST (Mi) — Manhattan Merry -Go- 
Round. Rachel Car lay, blues singer; 
I'ierre Le Kreeun, tenor; Jerome .Mann. 
Impersonator; Andy Sannclla's Orchestra; 
Men About Town trio. ( sterling Prod- 

WEAF nC WTIC. WJAR. WTAM. WCSH, 
WFBR WRC. WGY, WWJ. WSAI. 
CFCF KYW, KFYR. WMAQ. KSD, 
WHO' MOW, M'TMJ. KSTP, WEBC, 
WDAF KOA. KDYL. KHQ. KPO. KFI. 
KGW. KOMO, WHIO. WTAG. WCAE. 

Q-OO^FDST <%) — Silken Strings Trogram. 
Charles Previn and his orchestra. (Keal 

wV'wBAL, WMAL, WBZ. WBZA. 
WSYR, "WHAM. KDKA. WGAR, WLW, 
WENR KSO. KWK, WREN. KOIL. 
WMT, WJR, WFIL. 

9 80 kdst <Vi>— Cornelia otis Skinner, ac- 

J tress and .nonologist (.Icrgei. s Lotion ) 

WIZ WBZ, WMAL, WJR, WLW. 
WBZA. WBAL. WSYR. WHAM. KDKA. 
WGAR. WENR- KSO, 
KOIL. WMT, "WFIL. 

0:30 FDST ( Vj.)— American 

iliar MUSIC Frank Mann, tenor ; \ . — 
enne Segal, soprano; Bert rand Hlrscn, 

xiotinist; Haenschen Concert prchestra. 

(Sterling Products, Inc.) 



WJZ. WBAL, 
WSYR, WHAM. 
WENR, WPTF, 
WIOD, WFLA, 



WEEI. WBEN. 
WGY. WTAM. 
"WFBR, WLW. 



6:45 EDST (V4) — Lowell Thomas gives the 
dav's news. (Sun Oil.) 

WJZ. WLW, CRCT. WBAL, WBZ. 
KDKA, WHAM, WJR, WSYR, WBZA, 
WJAX. WFLA, WMAL, "WGAR, WRYA. 
WIOD. 

7:00 FDST P4) — Amos 'n' Andy. (Pepso- 
dent.) 

"W EAF and network. 
(See also ll:0n P.M. EDST.) 
7:00 EDST (%) — "Just Fntertainment." 
Variety Program. (Wm. Wrigley, Jr., 
Co.) WABC network. 
7:15 EDST (%) — Tony and Gus — dramatic 
sketch with Mario Chamlee and George 
Frame Brown. (General Foods Corp.) 

WMAL, WBZ. WBZA. 
KDKA, WCKY, WFIL, 
WIS. WWNC, WJAX, 
WSOC. WTAR. "WGAR. 
7:15 EDST OA) — "Uncle Ezra's Radio Sta- 
tion E-Z-K-A." (Dr. Miles Labora- 
tories.) 

WEAF. WJAR. WTAG. 
WCAE. WRC, WCSH, 
"WMAQ. KYW. WHIO. 
WHO. WOW, "WDAF. 
7:45 EDST (Vi) — Dangerous Paradise with 
Elsie llitz and Nick Dawson. (Wood- 
bury's.) 

WJZ WLW. WBAL. WMAL. WR7. 
WBZA, WSYR. WHAM. KDKA. WENR. 
KTBS, KWK. KSO. KOIL. WREN, WSM. 
"WSB. "WSMB. W BAP. "WFIL. 
7:4") F.DST (>/i) — Hoake Carter, commenta- 
tor on the news. (Philco Radio and 
Tele\ isi.m Corp.) 

WABC. WCAO. KMBC. WNAC. WDRC, 
WEAN, WFBL. WKRC. WJSV, WHK. 
CKLW, WCAU. WJAS, WBT. WGR, 
WBBM, WHAS, KMOX, KRLD, KOMA. 
WCCO. 

8:00 KDST (M>) — Fibber UcOee and Molly 

Comedy sketch with Marion and Jim 

Jordan; Lynn Martin, contralto; mixed 

sextette; Clderlco MarceUl's orchestra, 

NBC Service Chicago Studios to WJZ 
WFIL WBAL, WMAL. WBZ. WBZA. 
WHAM. KDKA. WCKY. WLS, WMT. 
KSO KOIL. WREN. KDYL, KFI. KGW. 
KOMO. KHQ. KPO, WSYR, WGAR, 
KOA. 

8:00 F:DST <V>) — BSSO Market i rs 
Gin 1 .0111 ha rdo. (standard Oil 
N. J.) 

WABC, WOKO 
WDRC, WCAU, 
W.ISV, WPG. 
WHIG. WHP. 

WtlBF. "WLAC. WDSU, WMBG. 
WHEC, KWKH. WMAS. WIBX, 
WS.IS. WORC. WCHS, WESG, 
WCSC. _ 
8:30 KDST (Mt) — Firestone Concert; Mar- 
caret speaks, soprano: Win. Dab's cir- 

(Coittinucd on Page 84) 



WCAO, WNAC, 
WJAS, WEAN, 
WBT. WDOD. 
WNOX, KLRA. 



present 

Co. of 

WGR, 
W FBI.. 
WDNC. 
W RBC, 
WDBJ, 
WWVA, 
WICC. 



82 



RADIO STARS 



~Tkat Meltln ' l/oice 

{Continued from page 27) 



youngster. He liked to work for his dad, 
who often took him out prospecting for 
lumber in the woods and swamps. Besides, 
around the mill, Jimmy could always find 
just the right-sized pieces of oak or mango 
wood he needed to build his boats. 

When his first sloop was finished he 
painted "La Rcve" (the title of his fa- 
vorite musical composition) on the gun- 
wale and went sailing. He never has for- 
gotten the thrill of that first sail. Boats 
still are his hobby. From the window of 
his East River apartment he watches them 
for hours at a time as, with lights winking 
in the dusk, they pass through Hell Gate 
into the murky Harlem River. And he 
wishes now for a sawmill close by, because 
he still builds ship models and miniature 
trains — and his wife claims he's right 
handy at putting up a kitchen shelf. 

But in his youth it was not only the 
cross-cut saw that kept him busy. Sing- 
ing in the choir, running errands, school 
work and various other activities kept 
him out of mischief and quite out of 
breath, till he emerged from High School 
with a diploma. Immediately he began 
working his way through the University 
of Florida, with the idea of becoming a 
lawyer. 

He was still a Freshman and only six- 
teen when his most embarrassing mo- 
ment occurred. He blushes even now 
when he tells the story — but it brought 
with it the beginning of his unexpected 
professional career. 

"It was a sort of 'tug of music'," he ex- 
plains, "to find out which could sing 
louder, the students in the balcony or those 
in the assembly. The song was 'Amer- 
ica the Beautiful', and I was on the bal- 
cony team. I guess I felt especially good 
that day — anyway, I sang louder than the 
whole bunch of them. Suddenly Presi- 
dent Murphee stopped us. 

"'Who is the Chapel Caruso?' he de- 
manded, looking straight at me. 

"I hid behind the bench, but finally I 
had to show myself. And believe me, I 
was scared to death. Fellows had been 
'shipped' for less than that." 

But the President didn't expel Jimmy ; 
instead, he ordered him to sing a solo 
before the entire student body. Jimmy 
did, though he was petrified, and when 
he finished, he admits shame-facedly, 
"Everyone applauded. Gosh!" 

From that day on President Murphee 
took a special interest in the Melton boy. 
He mapped out a course for him in lan- 
guages and music, and the law studies 
were forgotten entirely in the new scheme 
of things. Jimmy plunged into work with 
characteristic enthusiasm, yet he found 
time to join a fraternity — Delta Tau Delta. 
Trust him not to miss a thing. 

"For initiation," he recalled, "they tied 
me to a big tombstone out in the ceme- 
tery, seven miles from town. I was sup- 
posed to stay there all night. But it was 
too cold and creepy, so just as soon as 
the fellows were out of sight I pulled that 
tombstone up by the roots and walked 
(Continued on page 85) 




Behind a screen of matter-of-fact efficiency. Julia Scott tried to conceal 
her love for the man who was her boss. But that didn't work. She had 
to leave. When she told him, he made her a proposal — a proposal 
which was very different from one that was due a beautiful girl. 

What was the outcome of this strange bargain? You will be surprised 
to learn what happened to Julia in "She Married Her Boss," the story 
based on the Columbia Picture starring Claudette Colbert. 

Other complete stories and features in the October issue include "O'Shaugh- 
nessy's Boy" starring Wally Beery . . . "The Dark Angel" with Merle 
Oberon and Fredric March . . . "The Return of Peter Grimm" with Lionel 
Barrymore . . . "The Irish in Us" with lames Cagney . . . "Two for Tonight" 
with Bing Crosby . . . "Harmony Lane" with Douglass Montgomery 
"The Last Outpost" with Cary Grant . . . "The Clairvoyant." These and 
many other special features in the October issue, now on sale. 

screeh RomnncEs 

The Loue Story magazine of the Screen 

OCTOBER ISSUE NOW ON SALE 

83 



RADIO STARS 



I COULDN'T 
TAKE A STEP 
IN PEACE! 




(Continued from page 82) 



ANY person with Piles knows what suffer- 
ing is. Piles cause you physical suffering. 
They cause you mental distress. They make 
you look worn and haggard. 

Piles can take various forms — internal or 
external, itching or painful, bleeding or non- 
bleeding — but whatever form they take, they 
are a cause of misery and a danger. 

A Scientific Formula 

Effective treatment today for Piles is to be 
had in Pazo Ointment. Pazo is a scientific treat- 
ment for this trouble of proven efficacy. Pazo 
gives quick relief. It stops pain and itching. It 
assures comfort, day and night. 

Pazo is reliable because it is threefold in effect. 
First, it is soothing, which tends to relieve sore- 
ness and inflammation. Second, it is lubricating, 
which tends to soften hardparts and also to make 
passage easy. Third, it is astringent, which tends 
to reduce swollen parts and to stop bleeding. 

Now in 3 Forms 

Pazo Ointment now comes in three forms: (1) 
in Tubes with Special Pile Pipe for insertion 
high up in the rectum; (2) in Tins for applica- 
tion in the ordinary way; (3) in Suppository 
form (new). Those who prefer suppositories 
will find Pazo the most satisfactory, as they are 
self-lubricating and otherwise highly efficient. 

Try It Freel 

All drug stores sell Pazo in the three forms 
described. But a liberal trial tube is free for the 
asking. Just put your name and address on a pen- 
ny postcard or the coupon below and by return 
mail you'll get the free tube. Write for it today 
and prove the needlessness of your suffering. 
I 

Grove Laboratories, Inc. 

Dept. 37-M, St.Louis, Mo. 

Gentlemen : Please send me, in PLAIN WRAPPER, 
your liberal free trial size of PAZO Ointment. 

NAME J 

I 

ADDRESS. I 

I 

CITY. STATE ' 




MONDAYS (Continued) 
chestra. (Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.) 

WEAP, WT1C, WTAG, WEEI, WRVA. 
WJAR, WCSH, WFBR, WRC, WGT. 
WBEN, WTAM, WWJ, WLW, WCAE. 
CRCT, CFCF. WPTF, WWNC, WIS. 
WJAX, WIOD. WFLA. WSOC, WTAR. 
WMAQ, WHO. KPRC. KSD. WEBC, 
WTMJ, WIBA, KFYR, WSM, WMC, 
WSB. WJDX, WSMB, WAVE, WKY. 
KTBS, WOAI, KYW, WDAF. WDAY. 
KSTP. WOW. WHIO, WIRE, WFAA, 
WAPI, KTHS. 
8:30 EDST (%) — Evening in Paris — Odette 
Myrtil, the Pickens Sisters, Betty Bar- 
thell, Howard March and orchestra. 
(Bourjois Sales Corp.) 

WJZ anil network. (Starting date Aug. 
8:30 EDST (%) — One Night Stand with Pick 
and Pat; Joseph Bonime orchestra. (Dill's 
Best and Model Smoking Tobacco.) 

WABC, WNAC. WADC, WOKO, WCAO. 
WGR. WBBM, WKRC. WHK. CKLW, 
WDRC. KFAB. WCAU, WJAS. WEAN. 
WFBL, WSPD. WJSV, WLBZ, WICC, 
WBT, WOWO. WHP. WMBG, WHEC, 
WMAS, WORC. Repeat 11:30 EDST on 
KRNT, AVFBM. WHAS. KMOX, KERN. 
KM J. KHJ, KOIN. KFBK. KGB. KFRC, 
KDB. KOL, KFPY, KWG, KVI. KLZ. 
KSL. 

9:00 EDST (M>) — A & P Gypsies Orchestra, 
direction Harry Horlick. Guest stars. 
WEAF. WTIC. WTAG. WEEI. WJAR. 
WCAE. WCSH, WWJ, WGY. WBEN. 
WTAM, KSD, WOW, KYW, WDAF. 
WHO, WMAQ, WSAI, WIRE, WHIO. 
WRC. 

9:00 EDST (1) — Lux Radio Theater. 

WABC. WADC. WOKO, WCAO. WNAC. 
WKBW. WBBM, WKRC, WHK, KRNT, 
CKLW, WDRC, WFBM, KMBC, WHAS. 
KFAB, WCAU. WJAS, WEAN, KMOX, 
WFBL, WSPD. WJSV, WQAM, WDAE, 
WGST, WBRC, WICC, WBT, WBNS, 
KRLD, KLZ. KLRH. KLRA. WREC, 
WISN, WCCO, CKAC. AVLAC, WDSU, 
KOMA, WDBJ, WHEC. KSL, KTSA. 
CFRB, WORC. WNAX. KHJ. KOIN. 
KGB KFRC. KOL. KFPY, KVI, KERN, 
KM J, KFBK, KDB, KWG. 
9:00 EDST (Vi) — Sinclair Greater Minstrels; 
old time minstrel show. 

WJZ, WGAR. WWNC. WSYR. WRVA. 
WJR, WMAL. WTAR, WLW. WIS. 
WJAX. WIOD, WFLA, WBAL, WBZ. 
WBZA. KDKA. WSB. WSOC, WPTF, 
WLS, KWK. WREN, KSO, KVOO, KSTP, 
WEBC, WDAY, KPRC. KTBS, ROIL, 
KFYR. WTMJ, WFAA. WMC. WSMB. 
WJDX, WOAI. WKY, KOA, WMT, 
WIBA, WSM. KDYL, WAPI, KTHS. 
9:30 EDST (%) — Princess Pat Players. Dra- 
matic sketch. 

WJZ. WBAL. WSYR, WJR. WMAL. 
WBZ, WBZA. WHAM. KDKA, WGAR. 
WENR, WCKY. KSO, KWK, WREN. 
KOIL, WMT, WFILi. 
10:00 EDST (Vi> — Wayne King's orchestra. 
(I.ady Esther.) 

WABC, WADC. WOKO, WCAO, WAAB, 
WCAU. WEAN, WSPD. WBNS. WKBW. 
WKRC, WHK, CKLW. WDRC. WJAS. 
WFBL, WJSV. WBBM. KMBC. WHAS. 
KMOX, KFAB. WCCO. WIBW. WDSU. 
KRLD, WFBM. KLZ. KSL. KERN. 
KM.I, KHJ. KOIN. KGB. KFRC, KOL, 
KFPY. KVI, KFBK. KDB. KWG. 

10:00 EDST (M>) — Contented Program. Lulla- 
by Lady; male quartet; Morgan L. East- 
man orchestra; Jean Paul King, an- 
nouncer. (Carnation Co.) 
WEAF WTAG, WEEI, WJAR, WSAI. 
WRVA. WPTF. WWNC. WIS. WJAX. 
WIOD. WFLA, WTAR. WCSH, WCAE. 
WFBR, WRC, WTIC. WGY, WBEN, 
WTAM WWJ. WMAQ. KYW. KSD, WHO, 
Wi>\V WDAF, WFAA, KOA, KDYL, 
KPO, KFI. KGW. KOMO. KHQ. 

10:30 EDST (Ms) — I. Mac Time with the Night 
Singer; Baron S\cn von Hallberg's Or- 
chestra. (Pinaud.) 

WABC, WCAO. WBBM, WKRC, WHK. 
CKLW, WHAS, WJAS. WJSV. KRLD. 
KLZ, KSL, KHJ, KOIN, KGB, KFRC. 
KOL. KFPY. KVI. WGR. KERN. KM.I. 
KFBK, KDB, WCAU, KWG, KMOX. 
KMBC. WFBM. 
11:00 EDST (%) — Amos 'n' Andy. (Pepso- 

dent.) 

WEAF spilt network. 
11:15 EDST C/i) — Tony and Gils — dramatic 
sketch with Mario Chamlee and George 
Frame Brown. (General Food! Corp.) 

WMT. KSO. WREN. KOIL, W IRE. 
WTMJ. WIBA, KSTP. WEBC, WDAY. 
KFYR. WSM. WMC. WSB, WJDX. WSMB, 
KTHS, KTHS. WAVE. KOA. KDYL. 
KG1R. KG HI.. KPO, KFI, KGW, KOMO. 
KHQ, KFSD. KTAR, KWK, WAPI, 
WFAA. WJR. 
11:3(1 EDST (%) — Voice of Firestone Con- 
certs. 

KOA, KTAR. KDYL. KGIR. KOHL. 
KFSD, KFI. KGW. KPO. KHO. KOMO. 
KGU. (See also S:3I> P.M. EDST.) 
11:30 EDST (Vi) — One Night Stands with 
Pick and Pat. (Dill's Best and Model 
Smoking Tobaccos.) 

KRNT, WFBM, WHAS, KMOX, KERN, 



KMJ. KHJ. KOIN, KFBK, KGB, KFR 

v?r B ' J^V „ KFp Y. KWG, KVI. KLZ. 
KSL, KSCJ, WCCO. 

TUESDA YS 

(Sept. 3rd, 10th, 17th and 24th) 



6:45 EDST <V4) — Lowell Thomas. News. 

WJZ, WBZ. WBZA. WJR. WBAL. 
KDKA. WLW. WSYR, CRCT, WMAL. 
WHAM, WGAR. 
7:00 EDST (V4> — Just Entertainment. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 
7:00 EDST (»/ 4 )— Amos 'n' Andy. 

(For stations see Monday. See also 
11:00 P.M. EDST.) 
7:15 EDST (V4)— Tony and Gus. 

See Monday same time for stations 
7:30 EDST (Vi)— Singin' Sam. (Barbasol.) 
WABC, WCAO, WNAC. WDRC. WEAN. 
WJSV, WADC, WOKO. WKBW, CKLW, 
WHK, WJAS. WFBL, WSPD, WOWO. 
7:45 EDST (Vi) — Boake Carter. News. 

(For stations see Monday same time I 
7:45 EDST (Vi) — You and Your Government. 

WEAF and network. 
8:C0 EDST (y 2 )— Lavender and Old Lace, 
with Frank Munn, Tenor; Lucy Monroe, 
Soprano, and Gustav Haenschen's Or- 
chestra. (Sterling Products, Inc. — 
Bayers Aspirin.) 

WABC, WADC. WOKO. WCAO, WNAC, 
WGR. KMBC. WHAS. WCAU. WJAS. 
WEAN, KMOX, WFBL, WSPD, WJSV, 
WBBM, KRNT, KFAB, WKRC, WHK, 
CKLW, WDRC, WFBM. 
8:00 EDST (y 2 )_L e o Keisman's orchestra 
with Phil Duey and Johnny. (Philip 
Morris & Co.) 

WEAF, WTAG. WFBR. WBEN. WCSH. 
WPTF. WWNC. WIS. WJAX. WIOD. 
WFLA. AVSOC. WTAR. WCAE, KYW. 
WHO. WEEI. WJAR. WRC. WTAM. 
WTIC. WGY, WWJ. WDAF. WMAQ. KSD. 
WOW. 

(See also 11:30 P.M. EDST.) 
8:00 EDST (y 2 ) — Eno Crime Clues. Mystery 
drama. (Harold S. Ritchie & Co.) 

WJZ network. 
8:30 EDST (V 2 )— Packard Presents Law- 
rence Tibbett. 

WABC. WADC. WOKO. WCAO. WNAC. 
WKBW, WBBM, WKRC. WHK, KRNT. 
CKLW. WDRC. WFBM. KMBC, WHAS, 
KFAB. WCAU, WJAS, WEAN, KMOX, 
WFBL, WSPD. WJSV. WM BR, WQAM. 
WDBO. WDAE. KHJ. KOIN, KGB. 
KFRC, KOL, KFPY, KVI. KFBK KMJ. 
KWG. KERN, KDB, WGST, WBRC. 
WBT, WDOD. KVOR. WBNS, KRLD, 
WOC. KLZ. WDNC. WBIG. KTRH. 
WNOX. KLRA, WREC. WISN, WCCO. 
WALA, WSFA, CKAC, WLAC. WDSU, 
KOMA, WCOA, KOH, WMBG, WDBJ, 
KSL. KTSA. WTOC, KWKH. KSCJ, 
WIBW. CFRB. KTl'L, WACO, KFH, 
KGKO. WSJS. WNAX. 
8:30 EDST (Vi) — Edgar A. Guest. In Wel- 
come Valley with Bernadlne Flynn, Don 
Briggs and Sidney Ellstrom; Joseph 
GaIIicchio'8 orchestra. (Household Fi- 
nance Corp.) 

WJZ. W HZ. WHAM. WBZA. WMAL. 
WGAR, WBAL, KDKA. WSYR. WREN. 
KOIL. KSO, KWK, WFIL. WMT, WLS. 
WJR. WLW. 
8:30 EDST (Vi) — Lady Esther Serenade and 
Wayne King's dance music. 
WEAF. WCAE, WBEN. WRC. WSAI. 
WGY, WCSH. WTAM. WTIC. WTAG. 
WEEI, WJAR, WWJ. WTMJ. KSD. 
WOW, KYW, WHO. WIBA. WJDX. 
WDAY. WAVE. KTBS. KFYR. WKY, 
WDAF. WSMB, KPRC, WMC. KVOO. 
KSTP, WMAQ, WOAI, WSB. WIRE. 
WFAA. 

9:00 EDST (Vi) — NTG and his Girls. (Em- 
erson Drug Co. — Bromo Seltzer.) 
WJZ and network. 

9:00 EDST (Mi)-On the Air with Lud 
(■luskin. 

WABC and network. 

9:00 EDST C/i)— Ben Bernie and his Blue 
Ribbon orchestra. (Pabst.) 
WEAF, WTAG. WJAR. WGY. WSAI. 
WTIC, WEEI. WCSH. WFBR. WRC. 
WOW. KYW, KSD. WMAQ, WBEN, 
WTAM. WCAE. WWJ. WHO. 
(See also 12:00 Midnight KDST.l 

9:80 EDST <D— Fred Warinc's Pennsyl- 
vanians and Col. Stoopnatfle A- Budd, 
(Ford Motor Co. Dealers.) 
W A Tie, WADC. WOKO. WCAO. WNAC. 
WKBW, WDH.M. WKRC, WHK. CKLW, 
WDRC, WSJS. WFBM, KMBC, KFAB, 
WHAS, WCAU. WJAS, WEAN. KMOX. 
WFBL. WSPD. WJSV. WNHF. WKHH, 
WMHR. WQAM. WDBO. WDAE. KERN, 
KMJ, KHJ. KOIN. KFBK. KGB. KFRC, 
KDB. KOI.. KFPY. KWG, KVI. WGST, 
CFRB. WLBZ, WBRC. WICC. WBT, 
WDOD. KVOR. WBNS, KRLD. WOC. 
WBMK, KLZ, WDNC. WOWO. WBIG, 
WHP. KTRH. KNOX. KLRA. WEE A, 
W R ICC, WCCO, WALA, WSFA, CKAC, 
WLAC, WDSU, KOMA, WCOA, W.MBD, 
KOH. WDBJ, WHEC. KSL, KTSA. 
WTOC, KWKH, KSCJ, WSHT. WMAS. 
WIBW, KTUL, WIBX, WACO. KFH. 

(Continued on page S6) 



K4 



RADIO STARS 



~fka t Meltin ' l/oice 

{Continued from page 83) 



back to town, with it still tied to my back." 

That's characteristic of Jimmy Melton. 
He didn't like it in the cemetery, so rather 
than stay, he simply toted a hundred 
pounds of granite back to town with him. 

Prodigiously he studied with the vocal 
teacher at the University. He was active 
in the Masqueraders, the dramatic club 
of the school, and soloist of the college 
orchestra, besides being on the football 
team. But this was not enough— he also 
wanted a job in the band. So he locked 
himself in a room for three days and 
learned to play the saxophone. "I didn't 
play well, but I guess I played well 
enough, because they took me in." 

When funds ran low he organized a 
dance orchestra, playing all night, study- 
ing and attending classes all day. Then, 
working his way Northward by degrees, 
he left Florida to attend the University 
of Georgia. His dance orchestra there 
became better known ; proms and fraternity 
parties were his specialty, and his genial 
smile was to collegiate audiences from 
Miami to Washington a trademark for 
good music. 

Then he heard about a good voice 
teacher in Nashville, Tennessee. There 
was a University there, too — Vanderbilt. 
So Jimmy disbanded the orchestra, de- 
termined to spend his Senior year at 
Vanderbilt. That he was broke when he 
arrived made no difference to him ; he 
wanted to be an opera singer. He en- 
rolled immediately with the expensive 
instructor, found a job in a night club — 
and with the money he earned singing hot 
choruses by night he began earnestly to 
study operatic arias by day. 

At this time not even Jimmy himself 
knew which road his career would take. 
He might continue to be an orchestra 
leader and singer, or he might go into 
opera. He could sing both types of songs 
well. He still can, and this versatility has 
stood him in good stead on radio. 

After graduation he stayed on in Nash- 
ville for two years, playing and singing 
at the Hermitage Hotel, studying with 
Gaetano de Luca. Then suddenly he de- 
cided to go to New York. He was ready, 
he thought, for musical comedy; Broad- 
way was the place for him. 

When he arrived all of New York's 
six millions seemed to be out — but not to 
meet Jimmy. A young man named Lind- 
bergh was arriving in town that day, too 
—from Paris. So Mrs. Melton's little boy 
spent his first lonely, bewildered day in 
the metropolis without speaking to a soul, 
""just trying to cross Fifth Avenue." 

The next morning he discovered the 
painful truth. The managers, while of 
■course they didn't mind his coming to 
Broadway, didn't quite seem to recognize 
the name. . . . Yes, the Shuberts knew 
who Lindbergh was — in fact Mr. Lee 
Shubert had presented that young man 
with a diamond-studded pass, good at 
all of his theatres. But, "Who is Mr. 
Melton?" he inquired. 

All the other czars of musical comedy 
{Continued on page 87) 




MWJJV 





ALWAYS HERSELF 

Do you know a woman who is 
never at a disadvantage, never breaks 
^ engagements, never declines dances 
(unless she wants to!) and whose spirits 
never seem to droop? She is apt to 
be that eighth woman who uses Midol. 



NATURE being what it is, all women 
are not born "free and equal." A 
woman's days are not all alike. There are 
difficult days when some women suffer 
too severely to conceal it. 

There didn't used to be anything to do 
about it. It is estimated that eight million 
had to suffer month after month. Today, 
a million less. Because that many women 
have accepted the relief of Midol. 

Are you a martyr to regular pain? 
Must you favor yourself, and save your- 
self, certain days of every month? Midol 
might change all this. Might have you 
riding horseback. And even if it didn't 
make you completely comfortable you 
would receive a measure of relief well 
worth while! 

Doesn't the number of women, and the 
kind of women who have adopted Midol 
mean a lot? As a rule, it's a knowing 



woman who has that little aluminum 
case tucked in her purse. One who knows 
what to wear, where to go, how to take 
care of herself, and how to get the most 
out of life in general. 

Of course, a smart woman doesn't try 
every pill or tablet somebody says is good 
for periodic pain. But Midol is a special 
medicine. Recommended by specialists 
for this particular purpose. And it can 
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Taken in time, it often avoids the pain 
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You'll find Midol in any drug store — 
usually right out on the toilet goods 
counter. Or, a card addressed to Midol, 
170 Varick St., New York, will bring a 
trial box postpaid, plainly wrapped. 



85 



RADIO STARS 




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86 




{Continued from page 84) 



TUESDAYS (Continued) 

KGKO. WORC, KNAX, WKBN, CKCL. 

WOWO, WISN, KTRH. 
9:30 EDST (Vi) — Eddie Duchin and his 

Fire Chief orchestra. (Texas Co.) 

WEAF, WTAG. WJAR, WGY, WE El. 

WJAX, WIOD. WFLA, WLW, WTAR. 

WTAM, WRVA, WIS, WTIC. WCSH. 

WBEN, WW J. WPTF. WSOC, WFBR. 

WRC, WCAE. WWNC, WAVE. 

WMAQ, KSD, KTW, WMC, WSM. WHO. 

WOW. WDAF, WSB, WSMB. WKY. 

WBAP, KTBS, WTMJ. WIBA, KSTP, 

WDAY, KFYR, WJDX, KVOO, WOAI. 

KPRC, KOA, KDYL, KGIR, KGHL, 

KTAR, KPO, KFI. KGW, KOMO, KHQ. 

KFSD. WHIO, WIRE, WEBC. 
11:00 EDST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 

WEAF split network. 

KFSD. WHIO, WIRE. WEBC. 
11:15 EDST (Vi) — Singin' Sam. (Barbasol.) 

KLZ. KSL. KHJ. KOIN. KGB, KFRC, 

KOL. KFPY, KVI, KFBK, KMJ, KWG. 

KERN. KDB. 
11:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

See Monday same time for stations. 
11:30 EDST (Vi) — Leo Reisman's orch. with 

Phil Duey. (Philip Morris.) 

KOA, KTAR. KGHL. KGIR. KDVT.. 

KFSD, KPO. KFI. KGW. KOMO. KHQ, 

KGU, WOAI, WIRE, WIBA, WEBC, 

WDAY, KFYR. WAVE. WSM. WMC, 

WAPI, WSB, WJDX, WBAP, KTBS. 

KPRC. WKY. 

(See also 8:00 P.M. EDST.) 
12:00 Midnight EDST (Vi) — Buoyant Ben 

Bernie and his orch. (Pabst.) 

KOA. KPO, KFI, KOMO. KHQ. KGW. 

KGU. WEDNESDAYS 

(Sept. 4th, 11th, 18th and 25th) 

6:45 EDST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 

(For stations see Mondays.) 

7:00 EDST (%) — Amos 'n' Andy. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EDST (Vi) — Just Entertainment. 
(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 

7:15 EDST (Vi) — Uncle Ezra's Radio Sta- 
tion "E-Z-R-A." 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:45 EDST (Vi) — Boake Carter. (Philco Ra- 
dio Corporation.) 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:45 EDST (Y\) — Dangerous Paradise star- 
ring Elsie lliti and Nick Dawson. (John 
H. Woodbury, Inc.) 
(For stations see Monday same time.) 

8:0(1 EDST (Vi) — Johnnie Ai the Foursome. 
(Philip Morris.) 

WABC, WADC. WOKO, WCAO. WNAC. 
WHBM, WKRC, WHK. KRNT, CKLW. 
WDRC, WFBM, KMBC. WHAS. WCAU. 
W.I AS. WEAN. KMOX, WFBL, WSPD. 
W.ISV. WCCO, WGR, WHEC. KFAB. 
WLBZ. 

8:00 EDST (Vi) — One Man's Family. 
(Standard Brands, Inc.) 

WEAF WTIC. WTAG. WEEI. W.TAR. 
KYW. WFBR, WDAF. WRC. WGY, 
WBEN, WCAE, WTAM. WWJ. WSAI, 
KSD. WOW, WHO. WCKY, WWNC. 
WMAQ. WIBA, WEBC, WKY, WDAY. 
KFYR WPTF, WMC. WJDX., WSMB, 
WAVE KVOO, KTBS, WOAI, KOA. 
KDYL KPO. KGW. KOMO, KHQ, 
KTAR KFI. WIS. WRVA, WIOD. 
WFLA, WSM. WSB. KPRC. WJAX. 
KSTP WCSH, WHIO. WAPI. WBAP. 
KTHS WTMJ. WIRE. WLW. 

8:30 EDST (%) — Lady Esther Serenade. 
Wayne King "and his orchestra. 
(For list of stations see Tuesday same 
time.) . „. _ „ 

8-30 EDST (Vi) — House of Glass — dramatic 
sketch featuring Gertrude Berg, Joe 
Greenwald, Paul Stewart, Helen Dumas, 
Bertha Maiden, Arlcne Blackhurn and 
Celia Babcock. (Colgute-Palmolive-Peet 

WJZ WBAL, WMAL. WBZ. WRZA. 
WSYR, WHAM. KDKA. WGAR, WFIL, 
WLS WMT. KSO. WREN. KOIL. 
WPTF WWNC, WIS. WJAX. WIOD, 
WFLA, WTAR. WSOC, WJR. KWK. 

8 :00 KDST (1) — Town Hall Tonight. Jim 
llarkins, Major of Bedlamvllle; Jack 

smart, character actor; Songsmlth 
Quartet; Peter Van Steeden's orchestra. 
(Bristol-Meyers Co.) 

WEAF, W.IAR. WRC. WTAM. W.IAX. 
WLW WCAE. WCSH, WGY. WWJ, 
WTAG, WFBR. WBEN, WIS, WTIC. 



WMAQ, WOW, KYW. WDAF. 
(See also 12:00 midnight EDST.) 

9:00 EDST (%) — Home on Our Range, 
John Charles Thomas. Wm. Daly's or- 
chestra. (William R. Warner Co.) 
WJZ network. 

9:30 EDST (Vi)— Presenting Mark Warnow. 
Variety program. 
WABC and network. 
10:00 EDST (Vi) — Burns and Allen, come- 
dians, Ferde Grofe's orchestra. (General 
Cigar Co.) 

WABC, WADC, WCAO, WJSV, WNAC. 
CKLW. WORC, WCAU, WDRC. WEAN.l 
WKBW, WOKO, WBIG, WFBL, WHK. j 
WJAS. WKRC, WSPD. WBT, KMBC, 
KFAB, KSCJ. WFBM, KMOX, WBBM. 
WCCO. KOMA. KRLD, KTRH. KTSAj 
KLZ, KFPY. KFRC, KGB, KHJ, KOIN, 
KERN, KMJ, KFBK. KDB. KOL. KWG, j 
KVI, KRNT, WHEC, WDBJ, WOKO, 
WKBW. KSL. 
10:30 EDST (Vi)— He, She and They. Mary 
Eastman, soprano; Hubert Hendrie, 
baritone, with Symphony Orchestra Di- 
rection Howard Barlow. 

WABC, WADC, WOKO, WCAO, WAABJ 
WGR. WKRC. WHK. WDRC. WFBM. 
KMBC. WHAS, WJAS, WEAN, WFBL. 
WSPD. WJSV, WQAM, WDBO, WDAE. 
KHJ, KFBK. KGB. KFRC. KDB. KOL. 
KFrY, KVI. WGST. WPG, WLBZJ 
AVBRC, WBT, KVOR. WPNS, KRLD.I 
WOC. KLZ. WDNC. WOWO, WBHj 
KTRH, WNOX. KLRA, WFEA. WREC.J 
WCCO, WALA. CKAC, KOMA. WCOA.1 
KOH, WMBG, AVDBJ, WHEC, KTSA, 
WTOC. KWKH, KSCJ, W T SBT, WMASj 
WIBW, CFRB. KTUL, WIBX, K I'll. 
KGKO. WSJS. WORC, WHP, WLAC, 
WDOD. WSFA, WMBR, KRNT. WICC, 
WACO. WSMK, WISN. 
10:30 EDST (Vi) — Coty Presents Ray Noble 
and his orchestra. 

WEAF. WTIC, WTAG. WEEI, WJAR. 

WCSH, WRC. WFBR. WGY. WBEN. 

WCAE. WTAM. WWJ, WLW, KYW. 

WMAQ, KSD, WOW. WSM, WMC, WSB. 

WJDX, WSMB. WAVE, KOA, KDYL.1 

WHIO, WKY'. KTHS, KTBS, KPRC. 

WOAI. KPO. KFI. KGW. KOMO, WFAA. 

WIRE. WDAF. KVOO. KHQ. 
11:00 EDST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 

(For stations see Monday. See also 

7:00 P.M. EDST.) 
11:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations ) 
11:30 EDST (Vi) — Voice of Experience. 

(Wasey Products.) 

KLZ. KSL, KHJ. KOIN. KGB. KFRC, 
KOL. KFPY. KVI. KFBK, KMJ. KWG. 
KERN, KDB. 
12:00 Midnight KDST (1) — Town Hall To- 
night with Jim llarkins and cast. 
KOA. KDYL. KPO. KFI. KGW. KOMO. 

KHQ. THURSDAYS 

(Sept. 5th, 12th, 19th and 26th) 



6:45 EDST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:00 EDST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EDST (Vi) — J»*t Entertainment. 
(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 

7:30 F.DST (Vi)— The Molle Show. 
WEAF network. 

7:45 EDST (Vi) — Boake Carter. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

8:00 KDST (1) — Rudy Vallee and his Con- 
necticut Yankees. (Flelschmann'fl feaatj 
WEAF. WCSH. WRC. WCAE. WJAX, 
WWNC. WIS. WPTF. WIOD. WFLA, 
WRVA, CRCT. WTIC. WTAG. WBEN, 
WJAR. WGY. WTAM. CFCF. WLW, 
WEEI. WFBR, WMAQ. KPRC. WKY, 
KSD. WBAP. WAPI. KYW. WTMjl 
KSTP. WDAF. WJDX. WSMB. WSB 
WEBC. WDAY. WSM. WOAI. KFYR, 
WHO. WOW. WMC. KDYL. KOA, 
KTAR. KFI. KPO. KGW. KOMO. KHQ. 
WWJ. KVOO. KTHS, KFSD, WFAA. 

8:00 KDST (1) — Kale Smith. 

WABC, WADC, WOKO. WCAO. WESQ, 
WGR. WKRC. WHK. CKLW. WDRC. 
WFBM, KMBC, KFAB. WAAB. WJAS, 
WFBL, WSPD, WJSV, WQAM, 
WDBO. WDAE, KHJ. KFBK, KGB. 
KFRC, KDB. KOL, KFPY, 
WGST, WPG. WLBZ. WBHC. 
WBNS, KRLD, WOC, KLZ, 
WBIG. KTRH. WNOX. KLRA. 
WREC. WALA. CKAC. WDSU, 

(Continued on pa</e SS) 



KWG. 
KVI >R, 
WDNC, 
WFEA. 
WCOA, 



You can win 

RICHES! 1 

The Crazy Caption Contest is on Pages 32 and 33. 

NUFF SAID! 



'That Afeltin ' l/oice 

(Continued from page 85) 



were busy likewise — or else out of town. 
Jimmy knew what that meant. If he 
didn't like it he could go back to Ten- 
nessee. Or else get a job playing sax- 
ophone again. No, he was all through 
with that sort of thing; he wanted to 
sing. If the Shuberts wouldn't listen, 
he would concentrate on some one else. 
Roxy— he liked the name. It had a lucky 
sound. 

But Roxy, it seemed, had other ideas. 
Erno Rapee, his maestro, was also busy. 
At last, grown desperate, Jimmy decided 
on bold strategy. They had refused him an 
audition — well, he would stage one for 
himself. Outside Roxy's office door he 
bellowed at the top of his lyric voice — 
not in one language, but three. It worked 
like magic ; far sooner than it had taken 
him to cross Fifth Avenue a few days be- 
fore, the young tenor was a member of 
Roxy's famous Gang. 

Everyone fell in love with him imme- 
diately. Listeners called him the "Golden 
Voiced Tenor;" audiences melted under 
the spell of his dark eyes and engaging 
grin. He was modest but not too modest 
— a balance which is most usual. And his 
great ambition never had made him offen- 
sive to anyone. 

His success soon won for him the rec- 
ognition of the same important theatrical 
producers who had repeatedly refused him 
a hearing before. Now they came and 
sat "out front" listening, charmed by a 
voice they could not buy. Over four 
hundred telegrams poured into Roxy's 
office the first day, congratulating him on 
his new find. Within two months, Jimmy 
had been offered parts in a score of 
Broadway's biggest shows. 

But now he began to realize the poten- 
tialities of his voice. While he had 
learned to love the stage, he also had 
learned to fear it. The constant strain of 
singing loudly day after day might ruin 
the rich quality of his singing. And his 
ultimate goal was still the concert plat- 
form. The more he thought about the 
future, the more he wanted to study again. 
He was making over a thousand dollars 
a month, New York was at his feet, but 
he began to look around for another job. 

This time he had no difficulty. He was 
still captivating blase Broadway by his 
singing of "Charmaine" and "Diane" 
when NBC offered him a contract. Radio 
— that was just the thing he wanted. So 
he quit the stage and celebrated his first 
day on the air by attending the theatre 
— at Roxy's ! 

He became top tenor of the Revelers' 
quartette. And he upset the first re- 
hearsal he ever had with them by his keen 
Irish wit. The breezy wisecracks of the 
tousle-haired "kid" endeared him to the 
group. It was after one of these re- 
hearsals that Jimmy stepped into an air- 
plane and sped toward Akron, Ohio. The 
pilot encountered fog nearly all the way 
but that wasn't why Jimmy looked so 
serious. He knew his whole future in 
radio depended on that trip. He was go- 
' (Continued on page 89) 



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(Continued from page 86) 



THURSDAYS (Continued) 

WMBD, KOH, WMBG, WDBJ. WHEC, 
KTSA. WTOC, KWKH, KSCJ, WSBT, 
WMAS, CFRB, WIBX, WWVA. KFH, 
WS.TS, WORC, WKBN, WMBR, WDOD. 
WSFA. KRNT, WHP. WLAC, WICC. 
WACO. WSMK. WOWO, KGKO. 
9:00 EDST (1) — Captain Henry's Maxwell 
House Show Boat. Frank Mclntyre, 
Lanny Ross, tenor; Muriel Wilson, so- 
prano; Helen Oelheim, contralto; Conrad 
Thibault, baritone; Molasses 'n' January, 
comedy; Gus Haenschen's Show Boat 
Band. 

WEEI. WJAR. 
WFBR, WRC, 
WBEN, WCAE, 
WWNC, 
KSD, 



WTAG. 
WCSH, 
WIOD, 
WSAI, 
WMAQ, 



wsoc, 

WGY, 
WTAM, 
WJAX, 
KYW. 
WTMJ, 
WSMB, 
WOAI, 
KOA, 

KGIR, KGHL. KPO. KFI, KGW, 
KHQ, KFSD. WTIC, WHIO, 
WIBA, WDAY. WPTF. 

(Vi) — Death Valley Days. Dra- 
sketches. (Pacittc Coast Borax 



WEBC, 
WJIC, 
KTBS, 

WAVE, 



WOW 
WSB, 
WKY, 
KSTP. 



WIS. 
WHO, 
WDAF, 
WAPI, 
KPRC. 
KTAR. 



WEAF, 
WTAR, 
WRVA, 
WWJ, 
WFLA, 
KFYR, 
WJDX. 
WBAP, 
WSM, 
KDYL, 
KOMO, 
WIRE. 
9:00 EDST 
matic 
Co.) 

WJZ, WBZ, WBZA, 
WSYR, KDKA, WBAL, 
WMAL. WLS. KOIL, 
KSO. WMT, WFIL. 
10:00 KDST (1) — Paul Whiteman and his 
hand; Lou Holtz, comedian; Helen Jep- 
son, soprano; Ramona; the King's Men, 
and others. (Kraft.) 
WEAF. WTAG, WFBR, 
WEEI, 
CRCT. 
WJAR. 
WWNC, 
WHO. 
KTBS, 
KPRC. 
WDAY, 
WJDX. 



WJR. WLW, 
WHAM, WGAR. 
WREN, KWK, 



WWJ, 
WTIC. 
WCAE, 
WTAM, 
WAPI. 
WSMB. 
WIBA. 
KSTP. 
KTHS, 
KTAR. 

KPO. KFI. KGW, KHQ. 
10:00 EDST (Vi) — Alemite Half Hour. Hor- 
ace Heidt's Brigadiers. (Stewart-Warner 
Corp.) 

WOKO, WCAO. 
WKRC, WHK, 
WFBM. KMBC, 
WJAS. KMOX, 
KERN, KM J, 



WPTF, 
WFLA, 
WLW, 
WRVA, 
WMC. 
WBAP, 
WEBC. 
WDAF, 
WSB. 
KDYL, 



WJAX, 

WIS. 
WIOD, 
CFCF, 
KYW. 
WKY, 
KSD. 
WSM, 
WAVE, 
KOMO, 



WBEN, 
WCSH, 
WRC, 
WGY. 
WMAQ, 
WOW, 
WOAI, 
WTMJ, 
KFYR, 
KOA. 



WABC 
WBBM, 
WDRC, 
WCAU, 
WQAM, 
KFBK, 
KFPY, 
WBT, 
KTRH, 
WDSU, 
WNAX. 
11:00 EDST 



KGB, KFRC 
KWG. KVI. 
WBNS, KRLD, 
KLRA. WREC. 
WMBG, KSL, 
WDBO. WISN. 
( Vi) — Amos 



WN AC, 
KRNT. 
KFAB, 
WFBL, 
KH.T. 
KDB, 
WGST, 
WOC, 
WCCO, 
KTSA. 

Andy. 



WGR. 
CKLW, 
WHAS. 
WJSV, 
KOIN. 
KOL. 
WBRC, 
WLZ, 
WLAC, 
KTUL, 



(For stations see Monday same time.) 
11:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

FRIDAYS 

(Sept. 6th, 13th, 20th and 27th) 



6:45 EDST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 

(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EDST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EDST (Vi> — .Just Entertainment. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:15 EDST (Vi) — Tony and (.us. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 

7:1". KDST (Vi) — Uncle Ezra> Radio Sta- 
tion. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:45 EDST (Vi) — Boake Carter. 
(For stations see Monday. > 

7:45 EDST (%) — Dangerous Paradise. Elsie 
Hitz and Nick Dawson. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

8:00 EDST (Ms) — Soeony Sketch-Book. 
Johnny Green and his orchestra; Vir- 
ginia " Verrill, singer, and Christopher 
Morley. 

WABC, WOKO, WNAC, WGR. WDRC. 
WEAN, WICC. WORC, WLBZ, WMAS. 
WFBL, WHEC. WCAU. 

8:00 EDST (1) — Cities Service Concert. 
Jessica Drngonette, soprano; quartette; 
Prank Banta and Milton Rettenherg. 
piano duo; Rosario Bourdon's orchestra. 
WEAF, WTIC, WSAI, WEEI, WCAE. 
WWJ WCSH, WRC, WBEN, WTAG 
CRCT, WJAR, WTAM. WRVA (WGY 
off 8:30), WDAF. WMAQ. WKY, KSTP 
(WTMJ on 8:30), WFAA. WOAI, 
KPRC, KTBS, KYW. KSD. WHO, WOW, 
WEBC, KOA. (KDYL on 8:15 to 9:00), 
WIOD, WHIO, KFBK (WBAP oft 8:30), 
KVOO, KTHS. 

8:00 KDST < Vi ) — Irene Rich. Dramatic 
sketch. (Welch Grape Juice.) 
W.IZ WBAL. WBZ. WBZA. WHAM. 
KDKA, WLS. KSO. WREN. KOIL, WSM, 
WMC. WSB, WAVE, WMT. WIRE. 
WGAR, WJR, KDYL. KPO. KFI, KGW, 
KOMO, KHQ, WMAL. WSYR. 

8:30 KDST (Vi) — Kellogg College Prom — 
Kutli Kiting and Red Nichols and his 
orchestra; guest artist. 
WJZ network, 

!):II0 KDST (Vi)— Waltz Time. Vlvtenne 
Segal, soprano; Frank Munn, tenor; Ahe 
Lyman's orchestra. (Sterling Products.) 
WRAP, WEEI. WTAG, WLW. WRC, 
WBEN. WWJ. WJAR, WCSH. WFBR. 



WMAQ, KSD, 



WGY, WTAM, WCAE, 
WOW, KYW, WDAF. 
:00 EDST (1>— Campbell Soup Company 
presents "Hollywood Hotel," with Dick 
Powell, Raymond Paige's orchestra, guest 
stars. 

WBIG, 
WHK, 
WCAO, 
WHP, 
WKRC, 
WOKO, 



WABC, 
WIBX, 
WFEA, 
AVDBJ, 
AVJSV. 
WMBG, 
WQAM, 



WADC, 
WCOA. 
WBNS, 

WDRC. 
WKBW, 

WNAC, 

WSJS, 



WBT. 
WEAN, 
WCAU, 
WICC, 
WLBZ, 
WORC, 



WHEC. 
WFBL. 
WDAE, 
WJAS, 
WMAS, 
WPG, 



WSPD. CFRB, CKAC, 
CKLW, WBBM, WNOX. KWKH, 
WTOC, WSFA, WMBR, WALA, KFAB, 
KMBC, 
KTRH, 
WCCO, WDOD, 
WIBW, WLAC. 
KTUL. KLZ, 
KFRC. KGB. 
KDB. KWG, 



KFH, KLRA. 
KRLD, KSCJ. 



WBRC, 
WHAS. 
WREC, 
KFPY. 
KFBK, 



KMOX, 
KTSA. 
WDSU, 
WMBD, 
KSL, 
KERN. 



KOMA, 
WACO. 
WGST. 
WNAX. 
KVOR, 
KMJ, 

KHJ, KOH, KOIN, 
KOL. KVI, KRNT. WFBM. WNOX. 
:00 EDST (1) — Palm,. live Beauty Box 
Theatre. Guest artist; John Barclay, 
baritone, and others; Al Goodman's or- 
chestra. 

WEAF, WTAG, WEEI, 
WFBR, WRC, WGY, 
WCAE. WTAM, WLW, 
WHO. WOW, WTMJ. 
CFCF, WDAY, KFYR, WRVA, 
WWNC, WIS, WJAX. WIOD. 
WSM, WMC. WJDX. WSMB. 
WSOC, KTAR, WKY, WOAI, 
KDYL. KGIR. WBAP, KGHL. 
KPO. KFI, KGW, KOMO. KHQ, KFSD, 
WIRE, KPRC, CRCT. WSB. KSTP, 
KYW. WDAF, KTBS, WTIC. KVOO. 
10:00 EDST (Vi)— Richard Himber and 
Champions. Stuart Allen, 



NBC Service to 
WJAR. WCSH, 
WWJ. WBEN, 
WMAQ, KSD, 
WEBC, 
WPTF, 
WFLA, 
WAVE, 
KOA, 



Studebaker 
Vocalist. 

WABC. WADC. WOKO, 
WKBW, WBBM, WKRC, 
WDRC, WFBM, KMBC, 
WCAU, WJAS, KMOX, 
WJSV. WGST, WBT, 
WSBT, KFH. 
10:00 EDST (Vi) — First Nighter. 

with June Meredith, Don Ameche and 
Cliff Souhier, Eric Sagerquist's orchestra. 
(Campana.) 

WEAF. WEEI, WGY, 
WRC, WTIC. 
WWJ, WCSH, 
WHO, WMC. 
KPRC. WEBC, 



WTAG, 
WBEN, 
KSD, 
WKY. 
WSMB. 



WCAO, 
WHK, 
KFAB, 
WFBL, 
WBNS, 



WLW, 
WJAR, 
WCAE. 
WOW. 
WSM, 



WAAB, 
C KI.W, 
WHAS. 
WSPD. 
WCCO. 

Drama 



WFAA. WOAI. KOA, 
KPO. KFI, KGW. KOMO. KHQ 
KYW. WTMJ. 
11:15 EDST (Vi)— Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 
SATURDAYS 



WTAM, 
WFBR, 
WMAQ, 
WDAF. 

WSB. 
KDYT 
KSTP, 



(Sept. 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th) 

7:45 EDST (Vi) — Briggs Sport Review of 
the Air with Thornton Fisher. (P. Loril- 
lard Co.) 
WKAF network. 

8:00 EDST (1) — The Hit Parade — with Len- 
Die Hayton and his orchestra; Gogo d~ 
l.ys and Johnny llauser, vocalists; and 
others. (American Tobacco Co.) 
WEAF. WTIC. WEEI, WJAR, WCSH. 
WTAG. KYW. WHIO, WFBR, WRC, 
WGY. WBEN, WCAE, WLW. WTAM, 
WIRE. WMAQ, KSD, WHO, WOW, 
WDAF, WIBA. KSTP, WEBC. WDAY. 
KFYR, WPTF, WWNC, WIS, WJAX. 
WIOD. WFLA, WMC. WSB. WAPI, 
W.IDX, WSMB. WAVE. WTAR, WSOC, 
WKY. KTBS. KPRC, WOAI. KOA, 
KDYL. KGIR. KGHL. KPO. KFI, KGW. 
KOMO, KHQ. KFSD. KTAR. KGU, 
KVOO, KTHS (WTMJ, WFAA 8:30-9:00), 
(WSM. WBAP 8:00-8:30). WRVA 

9:00 EDST (Vi) — G Men. Authentic case« 
from official Department of Justice tiles 
dramatized by Phillips Lord. 
NBC Service to WEAF. WTIC. WTAG, 
WEEI, WJAR, WCSH. KYW. WFBR, 
WRC. WGY, WBEN. WCAE, WTAM, 
WWJ, WHIO, WLW, WIRE. WMAQ, 
KSD. WOW, WDAE. WTMJ. WIBA, 
KSTP. WEBC. WDAY, KFYR, WRVA, 
WPTF, WTAR. WSOC, WWNC, WIS, 
WJAX, WIOD, WFLA, WAVE, WSM. 
WMC, WSB. WAPI. WJDX, WSMB, 
WKY WBAP. KTBS. KPRC. WOAI. 
KOA. KDYL. KGIR, KGHL. KPO. KFI, 
KGW, KOMO. KHQ. KFSD, KTAR. 

9:30 EDST (1) — The Shell Chateau starring 
Al Joleon with guest artists; VlctOI 
Young and bis orchestra. (Shell Kaslerll 

Petroleum Products, Inc.) 

WEAF. WTIC. WTAG, WEEI. WJAR, 
WCSH, KYW, WHIO, WFBR, WRC, 
WGY. WBEN. WCAE. WTAM. WSAI, 
WMAQ. WDAE. WIBA. KSTP. WEBC. 
WDAY. KFYR. KDYL. WWJ. KSD, 
Wild WOW, WTMJ, WRVA, WPTF, 
WWNC, WIS. WJAX. WIOD, WFLA, 
WTAR. WSOC. KGIR. KGHL. KPO. KFI, 
KGW. KOMO. KHQ. KFSD. KTAR. KOA, 
WLW. 

9:30 EDST (1) — National Bam Dance. (Dr. 
Miles Laboratories.) 

WJZ WBZ. WBZA. WSYR. WHAM, 
KDKA. WGAR. WLS. WJR, WMT. 
KSO WIRE, KWK. WBAL, WMAL, 
WREN. KOIL. WFIL. 



RADIO STARS 



MUG 

COMPLETE 
nOUELS 



\A/ a item 



What the trouble was Cleve Allison didn't 
know, but it broke the second he loped into 
the little cow town of Burney, an ever- 
present menace to him and to the girl who 
so desperately leaned on him for help. 
Thunder in the West. L. P. Holmes' 
splendid romance of the range. 



■@d\rentwz2 



It was a dead man's hate that sent Kurt 
Reid on a strange quest for gold in a land 
from which no white man could take gold 
and live. But Kurt took up the challenge 
of the grandfather who despised him, and 
undertook the quest. Forbidden Gold, a 
stirring adventure-romance by L. Ron 
Hubbard. 



Spott 



Joe Mallon's first fight in the Garden was 
a flop. But Joe was no palooka ... he 
knew that sometime he'd come back, knock 
Bull Bent* out of the running, and show 
New York where to get off. GRUDGE 
FIGHT, Philip L. Scruggs' gripping story 
of a fighter's defeat and his courageous 
struggle to stage a comeback. 



SIX HOURS TO LIVE— Paul Ernst has writ- 
ten a breath-taking story of an attempt to 
rescue an innocent man from the electric 
chair. A mystery story with superb ac- 
tion, speed, and — naturally — a hair-raising 
suspense. 



o ma nee 



Bob Cunningham finds himself caught in 
the barbed meshes of Ethiopian intrigue, 
with every man a potential enemy, not 
only to him but to the girl he loves. He 
knows that peril dogs every move he 
makes, and the shadow of death hovers 
over Gloria Lancaster. THE DEVIL'S 
LAIR, Zachary Cook's romance of Abys- 
sinia. 



HUE 
nOUELS 



October issue on sale Sept. 13th 



'Tkat Meltln ' l/oice 

(Continued from page 87) 



ing to meet a prospective sponsor — and, 
though he did not know it, he was going 
to meet his future wife. 

Marjorie Louise McClure was in Akron, 
on a vacation from Bryn Mawr. In spite 
of the fact that he is as gallant with the 
ladies as any Southern boy, Jimmy had 
never been in love — not until the moment 
he saw her. Then he was, hopelessly. 
He didn't wait any longer for marriage 
than he waits for anything else. He 
threw himself into courtship with the 
same impatience which marks all that he 
does. The next night Marjorie heard him 
sing an aria from "Romeo and Juliet" 
for her alone, and she knew he was pro- 
posing in song. The result — well, she got 
her mother's consent while he got the li- 
cense, and, reader, he married her. 

To celebrate, he bought a yacht and 
christened it with champagne. Then 
started a series of concert engagements 
all over the country. On his return, he 
accepted another radio program which 
makes him today one of radio's busiest 
singers. He arranges and scores all his 
own music, and wishes there were more. 
When his manager contracts for a per- 
sonal-appearance tour or special perform- 
ance as guest star, Jimmy claps him on the 
shoulder and says: "That's great. But 
zvhat'll I do next week?" He and Mar- 
jorie jump in a plane at half an hour's 
notice with the greatest of ease, if 
there's work for Jimmy at the other end 
of the line. 

Still this is not enough. He never has 
stopped studying for opera. He has 
learned the scores of three operas recently, 
"Madame Butterfly," "Manon" and "La 
Traviata." He is seldom seen without a 
text book in which he is immersed. 
French, Spanish, Russian — he'll know them 
all before long. For he believes that with 
international broadcasts becoming more 
frequent, it soon will be necessary for 
American singers to know foreign lan- 
guages. And, as usual, he wants to be 
at the head of the class. By the time 
you read this he will be in Hollywood, at 
work on a new picture. But he'll still be 
doing all his other jobs; this will be just 
one more. 

He is full of enthusiasms, but yachting 
comes first. Spring found him painting 
his yacht Melody with its two 150-horse 
power motors ; the first warm breeze of 
summer found him far out in cool wa- 
ters, glorying in the wonders of air and 
water and sun. Both he and Marjorie are 
excellent sailors, and Marjorie knows al- 
most as much about boats as he does. 
They have had many experiences while 
racing the white-capped billows of Long 
Island Sound, or sailing down to Wash- 
ington. Once they were caught in a bad 
squall and couldn't radio for help because 
the wireless was broken. 

"But the grimmest thing of all hap- 
pened when we were right in dock. I'll 
never forget it if I live to be a hundred," 
Jimmy says. 

He was on the deck of the Melody, 
talking to his friend, the captain of another 




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89 



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The Whitney Family Ensemble, after having been on concert tour for three 
years, now is heard regularly from Chicago over NBC networks. Robert, 
the eldest, first entered radio in 1922 as pianist and announcer at WMAQ, 
Chicago. His sisters joined him to form the present group in 1927. The 
girls (left to right) are: Edith, second violin, Edna, viola, Noreen, first violin, 

and Grace, cello. 



yacht which was anchored a few feet 
away. Suddenly the old man opened his 
mouth oddly and toppled overboard. Jim- 
my is six feet three inches tall, and built 
like a football tackle, but just the same 
he was scared that day. He stood still 
for a second, stupefied, then plunged into 
the icy water to save his friend. 

"I got him out," Jimmy told us soberly, 
"but he had died from heart failure be- 
fore he ever fell off the boat. He was 
a good old tar and I liked him. I'll never 
forget the expression on his face. . . . I've 
been helping support his family ever 
since. It's the least I could do for a 
friend." 

Jimmy has a lot of people who look to 
him for aid. He has been taking care of 
his family ever since he first made good. 
He returns to Florida every Christmas to 
go 'possum hunting — that's his story. 
Actually he goes to make sure things are 
all right at home. Last year, for in- 
stance, he didn't see a 'possum on the 
whole trip — but he did see a nice house, 
and bought it for his three sisters who are 
his wards. He has managed their affairs 
for years — another little side job we forgot 
to mention. 

The number of yachting magazines he 
reads would seem to us to supply a full- 
time job. Even Jimmy admits it doesn't 
leave him much time to read the daily 
newspapers. He also devours mystery and 
adventure stories by the dozen. He likes 
"the kind where the hand comes around 
the door — you know, the real hair-raisers I" 
. . . He has almost a small-boy passion for 
movies, and he has been known to sit 
through a picture as much as three times. 
His favorites are Edgar Wallace pictures, 



with gangster stories as second choice. 

Lawrence Tibbett lives in the apartment 
below him and is perhaps his best pal. 
Often these two pack up for some deep- 
sea fishing and start out alone ; or, 
they take their wives and friends aboard 
the Melody, so as to have some one to 
beat at deck tennis. Guests on the boat 
usually means that Jimmy has prepared a 
huge batch of his famous spaghetti or 
baked beans. He has any number of culi- 
nary specialties. His wife claims their 
honeymoon was really a sort of "cook's 
tour." He likes food, and he likes cook- 
ing. "There's something elemental about 
preparing a good broiled steak," he says. 
He also can cook a mean meal over a 
campfire. 

But no enthusiasm can reach such a 
pitch that it interferes with the Melton 
music. When his fondness for food had 
reached the point where he was getting, 
well, plump, Jimmy tightened his belt and 
his lips and reduced twenty-eight pounds. 
It was hard work, but it was worth it. 
He is better looking now, and can look 
any movie camera in the eye without 
flinching. His figure is that of a boy, his 
muscles hard from daily exercise. 

He takes excellent care of his person 
without being a health fanatic. He doesn't 
smoke or drink ; he rises daily at nine, 
and always gets from eight to ten hours 
sleep each night — so you can figure out 
for yourself that he's no night-owl. 

"You can't have everything," he says. 
"If you want to be a singer you have to 
key your whole life to it." 

You can't have everything . . . one looks 
at Jimmy Melton and wonders. 

The End 



•in 



RADIO STARS 



{Continued from page 42) 



come — for the baby's good. It would 
have been unfair to raise him in a house 
that knew only unhappiness." 

So they had separated. Carol took the 
I baby. She went back to her folks and 
set about being both a mother and father 
to her child. During the mornings and 
evenings, she was mother, caring for Don- 
nie and loving him; during the day, she 
was daddy, going to work to supply the 
things Donnie needed — and at night, 
after ten o'clock, she was Carol Deis, go- 
ing out for her singing lessons and prac- 
ticing against that day when a chance 
might come. 

"Interesting," admitted the executive ; 
then he brought up that incredibly ancient 
idea : "but we must keep it quiet. You've 
got a voice and the looks, so we mustn't 
let out anything like marriage and divorce, 
that would impair your chances. Like 
scandal, for instance. We'll publicize you 
as a young steno getting some place. . . . 
Just forget your past and go on from 
here." 

Forget her past! 

Why, her past was the grandest thing 
about her. It was the only thing that 
made this new world desirable. 

Still, she did not know but what this 
immensely stupid move was one of the 
sacrifices she would have to make to as- 
sure her son the things every mother 
wants her boy to have. 

So, little Donnie, whose teeth were 
just completing their debut and who was 
just beginning to walk without falling 
down every ten steps with an amazing 
bump, stayed in Dayton with his grand- 
mother while his mother went to Phila- 
delphia to study. 

"It was a lonesome, homesick exist- 
ence," Carol says, "and one constantly 
beset by a thousand little fears. The most 
recurrent was that Donnie would forget 
me. After that, I was practically frantic 
with the thought that he might swallow 
a button or become ill — and I wouldn't be 
there to thump him on the back or nurse 
him. If it hadn't been he who was bene- 
fiting, I think I would have handed the 
prize back — with thanks!" 

For a full month, Carol continued 
woodenly her rounds of study and work. 
Then, one day, her teached called her in 
for a conference. 

"Carol," he said gently, "your voice 
is grand and your technique is excellent. 
But, my dear, you must — you must sing 
as though the song were worth the effort 
of opening your mouth." 

"I know," Carol replied humbly, "but — " 

She said no more. She thanked him 
and went to her lonely room. Miserable 
place, she thought, how different you'd be 
if Donnie were here. He'd brighten you 
up. If only I could be tucking him into 
bed over there and scrubbing off his chin 
after luncheon here. No one would have 
to know. . . 

She dropped everything and fled to 
Dayton. 




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Lovely Ruth Robin, soloist with Charles Barnet's orchestra, is 
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Robin is just nineteen. Listeners love her deep-throated voice. 

91 



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What will the daisy say? "He loves me, he loves me not!" Betty Winkler 
pulls the fateful petals, while Don Briggs looks on. Betty plays the role 
of Esther Ferguson, and Don plays that of Doctor Haines in the Welcome 
Valley program with Edgar A. Guest. Theirs is the "love interest." 



It's too bad that someone who knew 
could not have told her as she sat at 
home that next day and bounced a de- 
liriously happy little boy up and down 
on her knees, that this was the stuff 
America loved — that everyone would be 
glad to know of something as touching 
and tremendous as her affection for her 
child . . . But no one like that was there, 
so when she did finally say what was in 
her mind, only her mother could answer. 

"Mother," she declared, "I have to have 
him there with me or give it up. I nearly 
go mad, so far away from him." 

Carol's mother thought for a moment. 
"Probably," she said finally, "the man 
knew best. He has seen them fail often, 
I suppose, and knows why they do. But 
after you've gone into radio — got your job 
— I don't think they'd care. You could 
surely have him then!" 

"Of course," Carol breathed. "Why 
hadn't I thought of that? When I've got 
my contract, why, there's no reason they 
should object. I'll be able to afford a 
nice place, too." 

Carol went back to Philadelphia, all 
buoyed up. She went at her work with 
a new interest, sustained by secret flying 
trips home. Even the three months she 
spent studying in Paris were happy ones ; 
for, though she was a long way from 
home, she knew each day that passed pre- 
pared her for a triumphant entry into her 
chosen field. And that meant that Donnie 
would be hers — for all the world to know ! 

When she returned to America, she went 
directly to Dayton for a week of rest and 
then returned to New York, where she set 
in motion that machinery that would make 
her a radio star. 

"1 had never," she says, "been happier 
than I was those first few days. There was 



so much to do. I had to find an apartment 
and a good nursery school. I had to buy 
dishes and furniture. I felt the same ex- 
citement I knew when Earl and I 
furnished that little bungalow, only this 
time I was sure nothing could go wrong, 
because — well, it didn't seem that anything 
could. I auditioned and signed contracts 
and met people. Then, when everything 
was prepared, I arranged for the story 
that would tell about Donnie." 

She went in for the interview with a 
light heart. She told everything, just as 
she had told everything after she had first 
won her right to this future. "He takes 
awfully cute pictures, too," she con- 
cluded brightly. 

"We can understand how you feel," her 
sponsors answered, "but you must con- 
sider this : If the young men in Podunk 
and Oskaloosa think you are free, they 
will set you up as their dream girl. They 
will propose marriage by mail and send 
mash notes. They'll vote for you in 
popularity contests. If they know about 
a son, they may not do that, so maybe 
we'd better just let your past stay in the 
background." 

The stupidity of this is apparent to 
anyone who knows that Bing Crosby has 
married and is raising a family and that 
other stars have adopted children without 
in the least impairing their romantic 
appeal over the air. It's even more 
apparent when one considers the jubila- 
tion of the fans over Jane Froman's mar- 
riage and the birtli of Tito Guizar's little 
daughter. But, apparently, the moguls 
didn't see that. And Carol had no one 
else to advise her. 

What did she do? 

What could she do? 

Carol was new to the world of eit- 



92 



ememberVbu/ 




RADIO STARS 



tcrtainment and the thought of those mil- 
lions of persons passing judgment on her 
frightened her a little — especially since 
the millions had been falsely represented 
as scandal-mad hordes aching to tear a 
newcomer to bits. 

She told the renting agent she wouldn't 
need the apartment. She told the nurs- 
ery school that things could wait. She 
became so certain that her career — and 
with it, the things she had planned for 
her son — would be ruined if the slightest 
hint of his existence leaked out that she 
bent over backwards in her efforts to 
keep it a secret. Her frequent moods of 
depression she overcame by carefully 
masked ''business'' trips to Dayton, where 
she snatched a moment of peace and rest. 

But it's all over now. This year Carol 
decided that she had had enough of that ! 
She brought her mother and Donnie 
East and had a swell time finding an apart- 
ment and a school. She went on a furni- 
ture and clothes buying spree that lasted 
two weeks. Then she asked me if I 
would tell the real story about him — if, 
and her eyes were anxious, I thought it 
would not hurt. 

I said it wouldn't. I said so because, 
at the moment, Donnie was sitting on the 
other side of the room and a ray of sun- 
light from the window was brightening 
his hair as he hoisted a small, red car up 
on to the sofa — and I didn't see how in 
the world anyone could hear their story 
and not love them for it. 

The End 




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■How A/otto &*Glk JQ.ad.io 



(Continued from page 17) 



If only these people would heed the 
wise and experienced advice of the stars 
and executives who say, "Stay away un- 
less you have experience, money and 
superhuman patience," they would spare 
themselves so much heartache and physical 
pain. 

But they prefer to undergo inquisitions 
that may leave them physical wrecks, if 
by so doing they would get that big 
Chance. Such as the chap who crept in 
the rear spare tire of Fred Waring's car 
one evening after a broadcast, and rode 
all the way in this back-breaking position 
to Fred's home. What he probably hadn't 
counted on was the fact that Fred lived 
in Bronxville — a good two hours' ride 
from the studios — and that the roads were 
bumpy and muddy. When the car stopped, 
he hopped out of the tire and flung him- 
self before Waring, begging for a radio 
job. "/ wanted to see you alone and tliis 
was the only way!" There was nothing 
for Waring to do. He was touched by 
this display of courage and ingenuity, but 
the boy had no experience and obviously 
no talent. He fed him, gave him fare 
and sent him home. 

One of these would-be stars was the 
cause of a panic in the studios. You may 
raise a sceptical eyebrow when you hear 
it, but take it from the guards in the 
building who had a hand in the final 
stages of this strange episode, it actually 
happened. 

A bronzed six-footer strode into the re- 
ception studios of Columbia and asked the 



hostess, Doris Sharpe, for an audition. 
That wasn't unusual, since this floor is the 
floodgate to all the individual studios and 
is always overflowing with musicians, 
singers and others, and Miss Sharpe is used 
to getting requests for anything. She 
started to explain that she couldin't give 
him an audition, when suddenly he pulled 
out a gun and twirled it around. He 
had come all the way from Wyoming, he 
scowled, and he was doggone tired of be- 
ing pushed around. He was gonna get 
an audition now else he'd blow the place 
plumb to hell. He looked mad enough 
to carry out his threat, and with that big 
gun being brandished about, it wasn't 
exactly healthy to go near him. But Miss 
Sharpe wasn't a hostess for nothing. She 
took a deep gulp, smiled at him and spoke 
gently, as a mother to a child. "Why, you 
can get an audition now— - ' Slowly she 
won him over, the fingers on the gun 
loosed their hold. While he was listen- 
ing intently, two studio guards pounced on 
him from behind, wrested away the gun 
and led him out. He was taken to the 
Bellevue psychopathic ward, but surpris- 
ingly enough, was found perfectly sane. 
"Radio madness," would you call it? 

Many stars have told me that they get 
letters written on expensive stationery 
from young men and women, many in 
college, who want to come to New York 
and act as personal maid or valet to the 
star solely in the hope that it will provide 
a stepping stone to a radio career. Al- 
ways a letter is sent back warning them 




And why not a beauty contest for men? Here is Jerry Freeman, with his 
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that he has the very best-looking, as well as the most harmonious orchestra. 



RADIO STARS 




A romance which defies the saying that you can't have a career and a 
happy home life. Xavier Cugat, Tango King, and his lovely wife and 
singer, Carmen Castillio, long have been noted both for their artistic 
success and for their mutual happiness. Here they are with two of their 
pets, in the charming garden of their apartment near the East River. 



that such a step is foolish and useless. 

The manager of one of the leading em- 
ployment agencies for domestic help told 
me that this is getting to be an increas- 
ingly difficult problem. On several occa- 
sions American boys and girls have drifted 
into the agency asking for jobs as cooks, 
maids and butlers. "They lie about their 
experience and tell me they are willing to 
work for nothing, but on one condition : 
the job must be in the home of a radio 
star or executive. One girl fooled us so 
completely that she was actually sent out 
as a nurse's helper to the family of a 
well-known radio personality. Within a 
week she was returned because the fam- 
ily got wise to her when she neglected 
the baby to show off her talents before 
her employer." 

They pose as window-washers, hair 
lotion salesmen, flagpole painters — these 
desperate Ten Thousand, if only it will 
gain them entree to the Broadcasting Pow- 
ers. One aspirant paid a hotel elevator 
operator fifty cents for a lesson in elevator 
manipulation. Then he applied for and 
got a job in Radio City. But his wrath- 
ful and wealthy father stormed to New 
York and brought the boy home before he 
had a chance to put his wild plan to 
work. "I have thirty elevator boys work- 
ing for me in my buildings," said the 
father, puzzled. "What made my boy 
run away to New York and get such a 
job? I can't understand it!" 

John Royal, vice-president in charge of 
programs in NBC, must surround himself 
with a horde of secretaries to keep out 
persistent crashers. But once in a 
while, one of them will get the better of 
him. A man claiming to be a salesman 



marketing a new hair-restorer treat- 
ment, finally gained an audience with 
Royal. In the midst of his sales talk he 
switched to talking about his own vocal 
ability and then let out a few lusty notes 
for good measure. But it availed him 
nothing. 

Probably no group in this vague Ten 
Thousand offers as many headaches as 
the mamas and papas of undiscovered baby 
stars. Pity young Paul Douglas, the 
shining spirit behind the Horn and Hard- 
art Sunday morning children's shows, who 
is the victim of most of these ambitious 
but misguided parents. 

"Somehow or other, they manage to 
find out my phone number and call at all 
hours of the day — the more unusual the 
hour the better, they reason, because then 
they can catch me unawares. Phone calls 
at one or two in the morning are not 
unusual. They give all sorts of reasons. 
One woman, I remember, wouldn't tell 
me what she wanted. 'It's a case of life 
and death,' she said. T must see you 
about someone close to you!' That last 
got me because at that time my ' mother 
was very ill, so I dressed hurriedly and 
rushed off to meet her. Well, you can 
imagine my disgust when I learned that 
I had fallen for a cheap gag to get me 
to hear about her prodigy who did a 
wonderful imitation of Jimmy Durante!" 

At another time, Paul was leaving for 
Philadelphia. He was seated in the train 
and was settling down to enjoy a good 
book when the conductor came to collect 
tickets. "What about your wife and 
child?" he asked. Paul, twenty-eight and 
blissfully single, looked up. There was 
a stout, middle-aged woman, with a pale 



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little girl hanging on to her skirt. The 
woman fell to her knees and clasped his 
hands fervently. "Oh, please, forgive 
me! I just had to see you alone. I 
heard you tell someone in the studios you 
were going to Philadelphia, so we hung 
around the Pennsylvania station all morn- 
ing until we saw you board this train. 
You must listen to my girl now. There 
were tears in her eyes and a scrapbook 
under her arm which she insisted upon 
showing him. The passengers were snick- 
ering, but the tears and the scrapbook 
won, and anyway. Paul had to get rid of 
his newly-discovered ' family, so he prom- 
ised to hear, the girl when he returned, 
if only ' they would please get off at the 
next station and go back to New York. 
Which they did. The child appeared on 
the program once but was not good enough 
to be repeated. 

A violinist, whose best days in vaude- 
ville were over, had tried unsuccessfully to 
break into radio. Finally, to gain his end, 
he turned street minstrel and played for 
pennies in the neighborhood of NBC. In 
hot weather or cold, rain, sleet or shine, 
he took his place on the sidewalk and 
played daily. He soon got to know quite 
a few of the stars and told them his sad 
and hopeless story until, moved by sym- 
pathy, they recommended him to the pro- 
gram officials. And then what? Yes, 
the officials decided to try him on the air. 
The ruse was very well planned, you 
must admit, and smoothly carried out. He 
got his chance . . . But unfortunately he 
never broadcast a second time. Constant 
playing out of doors in ever-changing 
weather had made his fingers swollen, thick 
and strained, and had ruined that sen- 
sitive violin touch! 

Then there was the tall, gaunt woman 



who strode into the office of Ernest Cutt- 
ing, audition director of NBC, wear- 
ing a white, flowing robe. She claimed 
to have received spirit messages from 
Jenny Lind, and through spiritualism the 
immortal Lind voice had been conveyed 
to her. If NBC would provide her with a 
microphone, she would perform a service 
to mankind and radio by allowing the re- 
incarnated Lind voice again to thrill the 
public. She was turned away dozens of 
times ; always she came back with a new 
"message" for the radio listeners. Finally 
she was barred from entering the studios 
altogether. I don't know whether she was 
just plain goofy, or whether the outland- 
ish costume and that absurd claim was 
just another method of attracting atten- 
tion. Knowing how determined these as- 
pirants are, I'm inclined to bank on the 
second guess. 

But no matter how you warn these Ten 
Thousand, no matter how often you re- 
count the tragedy, the heartbreak and the 
perils waiting for them in New York, 
they still break their necks to get there. 
Their hopes are as high as their chances 
for fame are small. Because it's not the 
suffering they remember, but the inspir- 
ing stories of the Vallees the Drago- 
nettes and the Kate Smiths. And each 
one of the Ten Thousand, deep down in 
his own heart, thinks that Fate has singled 
him out as the next favored child to bask 
in the spotlight as Radio's New Over- 
night Star. 

10,000 to 1. And still — with these 
overwhelming odds — they take those fool- 
hardy, those suicidal, those desperate 
chances. Is it worth it? 

Ten thousand voices cry, "Yesl" But 
they are mistaken! 

The End 




Before leaving this country for stage and radio engagements in England, 
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Nina Tarasova, intermtionally 
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4je Said A/o, 
(jult /like Tkat 

(Continued from page 35) 



"It Ain't Gonna Rain No More," which 
swept the country some years ago and 
had half the population going gaga think- 
ing up new lyrics for it. Yessir, that's 
his brainchild and he made enough on it 
to get married and set up a whopping 
trust fund. 

About that marriage, it created a sen- 
sation in 1924 because the entire ceremony 
was broadcast over the air. There were 
about four million guests, and Phillips 
Carlin was best man with a stopwatch in 
his hand. That unromantic stopwatch so 
unnerved the bride that she fumbled on 
her "I do's." Some people thought the 
wedding was a publicity stunt. No doubt 
it was — but there are Wendell, Jr., aged 
seven, and Lowell, five, to prove that it's 
been a success. 

With his feet planted so firmly on radio 
soil, Wendell's naturally had a chance to 
nab most of the radio's "firsts" for his 
scrapbook. He was the first to have a 
sponsor. It was the old Eveready pro- 
gram. He was the first to appear 
on a "network." In those days there 
was no radio chain, so he created his own 
by touring the United States in an auto 
and visiting the principal stations as "the 
Eveready Entertainer." Which makes 
him, then, the poppa of radio advertising. 

ONCE MORE 
Let us remind you: 
The smartest people are entering 
The Crazy Caption Contest 
See Pages 32 and 33. 



So when he gives a bonafide sponsor 
the air, his reasons are worth listening to. 

"I've been associated with my sponsors 
for almost three years," says he, "and I 
was getting into a rut. If I didn't get out 
in time, no other company would want 
me. 

"Then I was on a fifteen-minute pro- 
gram once a week, and my contract 
stated I was to sing exclusively for them. 
There wasn't enough work to keep me 
happy and that short time on the air 
was like a drop in the bucket. I was in 
danger of being lost. 

"But most important, lengthy commercial 
plugs were killing my program — and 
eventually my popularity. Imagine, on a 
fifteen-minute program the commercial 
took up about eight or nine minutes. It 
was annoying the listeners, and I was the 
one who was getting the blame. I had 
to wage a one-man fight and when I 
couldn't gain my point I just upped and 
left." 

It takes a lot of nerve to leave a spon- 
sored program and all the security that 
goes with it, for the uncertainty and lower 
pay check of a sustaining morning series. 
But — well, you'll find the explanation in 
the fiery mop of hair and the Boone blood. 
The End 



THE 



~ 10'Wortli 

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97 



RADIO STARS 




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98 



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{Continued from page 8) 



PAUL WHITEMAN. Marconi: Philip Martin, Conestoo, 

Ont. 

H0NEYB0Y AND SASSAFRAS, Marconi: John Fitz- 
stmmons, 23 Oak St., Augusta, Me.; Paul Gelman, 7 
Flagg St.. Augusta, Me. 

PRISCILLA LANE, Marconi: Paul Renibold. Riga. Mich. 

ROSEMARY LANE. Marconi: Alfred H. Mueller. 235 E. 
Main St.. New Holland. Pa. 

LANE SISTERS. Marconi: Howard James, P. O. Box 
622, Marcus Hook, Pa. 

TONY W0NS, Marconi, George James. 945 Rossini 
Boulevard. East Windsor. Ont. 

PAULINE ALPERT, Marconi: Florence Cortrlght. 152 
South Terrace, Boonton, N. J. 

JANE FROM AN, Marconi, Hannah Smitman. 7219 5th 
Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MAX BAER, Marconi: Bernadine Palcovic. 14 John St.. 
Johnston. N. Y. ; Betty Welsh, 60 Meeting St., Charles- 
ton, S. C. 

ENRIC M AD Rl GU ERA, Marconi: Leta Dell Read. Spur. 

Texas. 

K-7, Marconi (Chapter formed in behalf of a program): 
Leonard S. Gisch, 180 Gavin St.. Yonkers. N. Y. 

RUTH ETTING. Marconi: Joan Szabo. 644 E. St.. Lo- 
rain. O. 

FRAN Kl E MASTERS, Marconi: Harry Jacobs. Jr.. 2138 

So. Livingston Terrace. West Allis. Wis. 
RED FOLEY, Marconi: Miss Suzanna Remlns. 4620 N. 

Keating Ave., Chicago. III. 

GRACIE ALLEN, Marconi, Eleanor Meahl. R.F.D. No. 2, 

Lockport, N. Y. 
JULIA SANDERSON CRUMIT, Marconi: Maryland 
Louise Bay. 35 N. Belmont Ave.. Indianapolis. Ind. 

DAVE RUBIN0FF. Marconi: Daisy M. Hart. 815 Market 
St.. Alton. 111. 



FRED WARING. Marconi: Jack Doherty, 149 Winthrop 
Ave., Revere, Mass.; Ardell Beyer. 337 47tb St.. Union 
City. N. J.; Howard A. James. 123 White Ave.. Lin 
wood. Pa. 

HARRY RICH MAN, Marconi: Queenie Markowitz. 1105 

Stratford Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

RAY NOBLE, Marconi: Jack Bobbins, 225 So. Vermont 
Ave.. Atlantic City, N. J.; Primo Bastoni. 75 Summer 
St.. Kingston, Mass. 

MORTON DOWNEY, Marconi: Ruth Feinberg, 1683 llni 
versity Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EDDIE CANTOR. Marconi: Kay Askew, 1069 Strathinna 
St.. Winnipeg. Manitoba, Canada; Buddy Kettzahn 
1008 So. 3rd St., Springfield, 111. 

MYRT AND MARGE. Marconi: Helen H. Clegg, 1051 
W. 47th St., Los Angeles, Calif.; Margaret Bradshaw, 
3941 25th Ave., So.. Minneapolis, Minn.; Jean Brad- 
shaw. 3941 25th Ave.. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 

JIMMIE BRIERLY, Marconi: Miss Edna Langcnstein. 
222 S. Cedar Ave.. Maple Shade. N. J. 

HAL KEMP. Marconi: Flo OToole. 26 Lonsdale St. 
N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Volna Igleheart, Sacramento. 
Ky. 

HAL STERN, Marconi: Joseph E. Mullen. 2014 Atlantic 

Ave.. Atlantic City. N. J. 
BENNY GOODMAN, Marconi: Ruth A. Lukens. 49 Gates 

St.. Wilkes-Barrc. Pa. 
ROBERT SIMMONS. Marconi: Thelma Sovereign. 121 

Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 
EDWARD McHUGH, Marconi: Judson S. Brower. 1008 

Bedford St.. Stamford. Conn. 
JOE PENNER, Marconi, Miss Connie Benny, 50 Central 

Park South. New York, N. Y. 
DORSEY BROTHERS. Marconi: Charles MacMeekin. 

1750 Madison Ave.. Scranton, Pa. 

(Continued on page 99) 



Keep Ifounj and HeautifouL 



(Continued from page 15) 



She prefers the light, illusive floral bou- 
quet perfumes to the heavy, amber orien- 
tal scents. Always perfume should be il- 
lusive, never obvious, says Albani. The 
Spanish glamour exponent uses an ato- 
mizer for spraying perfume on her skin, 
and an atomizer for spraying brilliantine 
on her hair. She finds that the atomizer 
diffuses the brilliantine and prevents the 
oily look sometimes achieved when bril- 
liantine is rubbed on with the hands. 

Albani's favorite hair beautifier is the 
hairbrush. And her hair has a lovely 
sheen that is the natural result of the hair- 
brush rather than the use of oils and bril- 
liantine. She always wears her hair very 
simply. It is fine and glossy enough to 
be a coiffure in itself without the aid of 
curls or artifice. 

In general, the beautiful Olga's beauty 
routines are very simple. Perhaps therein 
lies their wisdom. She amazed an expen- 
sive beauty consultant when she said that 
she thought a few days of relaxation and 
plenty of rest would do her more good 
than the costly beauty treatment he pro- 
posed. Simple, thorough creams, and a 
gentle skin freshener in the nature of an 
astringent are her favorites for the skin 
cleansing routine. At night she uses 
cleansing cream, cleansing tissues, and 
her skin freshener astringent. In the 
morning she dashes warm water over her 
face, then cold. Next she pats on her 
skin freshener, and she is ready for pow- 
der and make-up. She likes the frequent 
use of a mild skin freshener because it 
makes her skin feel so refreshed and 
stimulated. 

Like all singers she believes in the 
efficacy of deep breathing exercises for re- 
laxation. And her beautiful throat may 
also owe some of the fineness of its de- 
velopment to the deep breathing exercises. 



too. But whether you have singing aspira- 
tions or not, try taking at least ten deep 
breaths in front of your open window 
every morning and every night. At times 
when you feel all tense and "tied up in 
knots," remember Albani's recommenda- 
tion of deep breathing exercises for per- 
fect relaxation. 

While the famous Albani's tastes in 
beauty routines are very simple, her tastes 
in food are a bit more elaborate. She is 
simply one of those rare and fortunate 
beings who can eat what they choose, and 
yet remain the same ideal weight. But the 
rest of us must stick to our spinach. 

From spinach to glamour isn't such a 
large stride. There's certainly a lot of 
glamour about perfect health and vitality. 
But even the sparkling eyes and red lips 
of health call for the added glamour of 
make-up. Perhaps these dressing-table 
pictures of Olga Albani will inspire you 
to clip the coupon and send in for the 
"Hints for Make-up Glamour" that I've 
prepared for you. You'll find included some 
of Albani's hints for make-up. 



MARY BIDDLE 
RADIO STARS 

149 Madison Avenue, New York. N. Y. 

Please send me your bulletin on 
"Hints for Make-up Glamour". 



Name. 



Address. 



Street 



City 



State 



Please inclose stamped addressed 
envelope. Personal beauty prob- 
lems will also be answered if desired. 



RADIO STARS 



Jle&jue (f alette 

{Continued from f>a</e 98) 



GLADYS SWARTHOUT, Marconi: Beverly Hook. 1339 
Glenn Avenue, Anuusta, Ga.; Laura Krleger, U.F.D. No. 
1, Box 24.1, Smyrna, Ga. : Gladys UcLoughlin, S. 
Broadway, De 1'cre, Wis. 

PATTI PICKENS, Marconi: Kenneth O. Baers. 2121 
South 30th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

JACKIE HELLER, Marccni: Mrs. William Sadofsky, 
9502 Cedar Avenue. Cleveland, O. ; Mrs. Larue Haral- 
son, 6145 South Ada St., Chicago, 111. 

AL JOLSON, Marconi: Isidore Durst, 3318 Steuben Ave.. 
New York, N. Y. ; Francis F. Towers, Manchester. 
Vt. 

DON AMECHE. Mrs. Eloise Baylis Earl, 625 Juniper 
Road, Fontana, Calif. 

02ZIE NELSON, Marconi: R. Brenner Thornburs. 62 
North Avenue. Hagerstown, Maryland; Joseph PbU- 
lippi. Camp S-127, Co. 1317, Antes Fort, Pa, 

EMERY DEUTSCH, Marconi: Miss Meta Papp, 22-30 
24th St.. Astoria. L. I. 

EDDIE PEABODY, Marconi: Douelas Haney. Box 266. 
Midlothian, Texas. 

NANCY CLANCY, Marconi: Stanley Novack, 123 Banta 
Ave., Garrleld. N. J. 

TITO GUIZAR. Marconi: Helen C. Johnson, 151 Herki- 
mer St.. Buffalo. N. Y. 

ANNETTE HANSHAW. Marconi: Joseph Bernett. 447 
Willius St., St. Paul, Minn.; Carolyn V. Kovacevic, 
State Sanatorium, Cresson. Pa. 

FRED ALLEN, Marconi: Emerson Davis, 40 Cross St.. 
Columbiana, O. ; Jack C. Penson. 55 Tupper Ave.. York- 
ton, Sask.. Canada: Miss Ardell Beyer, 337 47th St.. 
Union City. N. J. 

JOHNNY HAUSER, Marconi: John C. Berry, Box 15. 
Northvale. N. Y. ; Mrs. C. Foster. 14 Grapanche St.. 
Yonkers. N. Y. 

JERRY COOPER, Marconi: Alice Allicood, S23 Branson 
St., Favettevillc, N. C. ; Miss Lena S. Rausch, Bloom- 
ing Glen (Box 27). Pa.: Helen Tunis, 5300 Larch- 
wood Ave., Philadelphia, Pa.; Martha O. Moore. 5056 
Reno St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

RUDY VALLEE. Marconi: Mrs. Leslie Mills. Route 1. 
Box 71a. Magnolia, Ark. ; Ruth Davis. Georgetown, 
Out., Canada; John S. Gammon, 597 East Ave.. Ro- 
chester. N. Y. ; Eleanor Scuaal, 906 So. Marlborounh 
Ave., Dallas, Tex.; Virginia Shaw, 2012 No. Figueron. 
Los Angeles, Calif. ; Blanche Anderson, 2427 E. 70th, 
Kansas Citv. Mo.; Annette Bradbury, 263 Brackett St., 
Portland, Me.: Miss R. Head. 813 Park Ave., New 
York. N. Y.; Alicia Y. Olliphant, 1833 Powell Tlace, 
Jacksonville, Fla. : Frances C. Allen. 416 Lafayette 
Ave., Collingdale. Pa. ; Mrs. Edith Bourey. 232 Ampere 
Parkway. Bloomfield. N. J. ; Maybelle Taylor. 62 War- 
ren Ave., Whitman, Mass.; Miss Sadie Ermoian, 11929 
Wallace St.. Chicago. 111.; Janet Lomberg. 22 Elm Place. 
Nutley, N. J. 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS. Marconi: C. R. Waterhouse. 
320C University Ave.. Des Moines, la. 



This genial purveyor of laughter 
and high comedy is Marty May, 
Columbia's latest find, who frolics 
over the CBS airwaves every 
Thursday at 9:30 p.m. 



Of? 



The publishers of RADIO STARS guarantee that you will 
be satisfied with your purchase of every packaged product 
advertised in this magazine. If for any reason you are 
dissatisfied, RADIO STARS will replace the product or, if 
you prefer, refund your purchase price. In either case all you 
have to do is to send us the unused portion, accompanied 
by a letter outlining your complaint. This guarantee also 
applies if the product, in your opinion does not justify 
the claims made in its advertising in RADIO STARS 



Careful examination before publication and rigid censorship, 
plus our guarantee, enable you to buy with complete confidence 
the products you see advertised in this issue of RADIO STARS. 




Index of Advertisers 



Octoliet 1935 



PAGE 

American Chicle Company 73 

American School of Photography ..... 90 



Bauer & Black 

Blondex 

Blue Waltz Cosmetics . . 
Borden Company, The 
Brownatone 



59 
90 
93 
91 
96 



Camel Cigarettes 51 

Century Music Company 96 

Cheramy 78 

Chicago School of Nursing . . 96 

Chieftain Colorshine 95 

Chore Girl 90 

Cocomalt 81 

Coyne Electrical School 92 

Cutex 3rd Cover 



D. D. D. Corporation 

Dr. Pierre Chemical Company . 
Dr. Scholl's Zino Pads 



Enterprise Dripolator . 
Exlax 



95 
70 



80 
13 



Faoen Cosmetics 74 

Feen-A-Mint 4 

Fels-Naptha Soap 11 

Fireside Industries 82 

Fleischmann's Yeast 55 

Fletcher's Castoria 71 

Franklin Institute 97 

Gayanne Powder Puffs 96 

General Card Company 94 

Griffin Shoe Dye 98 

Griffin Shoe Polish 82 

Hollywood Rapid Dry Curlers 92 

Hubinger Elastic Starch ... 82 

Hush Deodorant 94 

Hydrosal Company, The. 97 

Hvgeia Nursing Bottles 86 

International Typewriter Exchange 92 

Ipana Toothpaste 3 

Ironized Yeast 76 

Irresistible Cosmetics 2nd Cover 

Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder 67 

Justrite Push Clips 80 



Kalamazoo Stoves . 
Kool Cigarettes. . . 



98 
60 



PAGE 

Lady Esther Company 77 

Lander Talcum Powders . . 97 

Larkin Company ... 82 

La Salle Extension University. . ... 98 

Lrvena Corporation 66 

Lavoptik Company 96 

Leonard Company, A. O . . . 94 

Lewis Hotel Training Schools 98 

Little Blue Books 80 

Lucky Strike Cigarettes 4th Cover 

Lux Toilet Soap 57 

Magic Chord Company 96 

Mahler Company. D. J 96 

Maybelline Mascara 89 

Mercolized Wax 94 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures ... 5 

Midol . . 85 

Midwest Radio Corporation ... 7 

Modess Corporation . 69 

Mum 79 

Nadinola Cosmetics 90 

National Academy of Music . 88 

Natural Eyesight Institute 92 

Nestle Colorinse 86 

Northwestern Yeast Company 68 

Noxzema 87 

Palmolive Soap 61 

Paramount Pictures ... 9 

Pazo Ointment . 84 

Perfect Voice . . 90 

Periplastic . 58 

Pond's Creams 53 

Pond's Powders 65 

Procter & Gamble. The 

Ivory Flakes 15 

Rhodes, Arthur 95 

Rieger Company, Paul 86 

Rit Corporation, The 64 

Rosicrucian Brotherhood 97 

Smith Typewriter Company, L. C 95 

Stebbing System 94 

Tangee Cosmetics 72 

Tempt Lipstick 86 

Thistle Engraving Company 88 

Tintex 63 

Valligny. Pierre 97 

Way Company, The 88 

Winx 75 

Zonite Corporation, The 62 



Although we make every effort to insure the accuracy of this index, we take no responsibility 
for an occasional omission or inadvertent error. 



99 




The last pose of Summer! But not the 
last rose, though fair enough, say we! 
She's Kaye Kernan, Cincinnati society 
girl, vocalist of Johnny Hamp's orches- 
tra. Lower left. What thanks does 
Red Barber get for teaching two fair 
pupils, Flora Fern Blackshaw and Mary 
Alcott, to swim? Only a ducking from 
the budding mermaids! Lower right. 
Beautiful Betty Winkler dares the sun 
in a beach-chair. Betty is twenty-one, 
5'3" tall, weighs 107 pounds. 



Autumn will soon be 
here. Let's dip once 
more in sunny deeps ! 





1 



Co**' aW**" 




/Co f ° . No' 1 1 




• MRS. FRANCIS L. ROBBINS, JR., wearing Cutex Ruby Nail Polish and 
smart matching Cutex Ruby Lipstick. Mrs. Robbins is a beautiful and 
popular member of Long Island and New York society. 

CUTEX 7&uf'fi r &^ a4u/eJ272££c/£. 



MATCHING LIPS 
AND FINGERTIPS 

/ ips and finger tips must match — that's the 
latest rule for make-up! And you had 
better follow it because you'll look pretty 
scrambled if you don't. 

It sounds like more work, but it isn't. You 
can be all matched up today without wrinkling 
a brow or lifting a finger. Because Cutex. has 
brought out a complete range of harmonizing 
lipsticks and nail polishes. 

6 smart harmonizing shades 

Just pick the smart shade of Cutex Liquid 
Polish that will best accent your costume — 
you can choose from Natural, Rose, Mauve, 
Coral, Cardinal and Ruby. 

Cutex is a polish that flows on evenly, leav- 
ing no rim or streaking of color. It won't chip 
or peel off. Cutex finger tips — and toe tips, 
too, if you want to be very smart — will stay 
marvelously smooth and gleaming. 

Now, you simply complete the color ensem- 
ble with the Cutex Lipstick that matches or 
tones in with your nail polish. Natural Lip- 
stick goes with Natural, Rose and Mauve 
Polish. Coral, Cardinal and Ruby Lipsticks 
match Coral, Cardinal and Ruby Polish. 

And remember — the new Cutex Lipstick 
shares the famous Cutex quality. It's creamy 
and smooth — never greasy. It goes on with the 
greatest ease and stays on. And it positively 
won't dry your pretty lips. 

You'll find Cutex Liquid Polish at your fa- 
vorite store. Creme or Clear, with patented 
metal-shaft brush that holds the bristles in 
tightly. Be sure to get the Cutex matching 
Lipstick, in its smart black enamel case! 

Northam Warren • New York 
Montreal London Paris 




Smart 
Young Things 
say — 

"Once you've 
seen yourself per- 
fectly made up with 
Cutex lips and fin- 
ger tips all in one 
smart color key, 
you'll wonder how 
you ever went 
around in ordinary 
clashing shades of 
make-up 1 " 




WILL THE MOVIES WRECK DRAGONETTE'S CAREER? 



HAT IS HOLLYWOOD DOING TO JACK BENNY? 

. — . . . ? - i& 1 > 





You, yes you, can become divinely irresistible. Use 
the lure that has always won love for famous, en- 
chanting women ... tempting, exotic perfume. Such 
is IRRESISTIBLE perfume. Wear it night and day to 
thrill ... excite senses ... madden hearts ... with its 
haunting, lasting fragrance. 

For perfect make-up match your lipstick to your 
rouge. Irresistible Rouge blends perfectly with your 
skin and actually stays on all day. Irresistible Lip 
Lure, the new different cream base lipstick, melts 
deep into your lips leaving no paste or film ... just 
warm red, indelible color. Irresistible Face Powder 
is so satin-fine and clinging that it hides small blem- 
ishes and stays on for hours. 

Be completely fascinating, use all the Irresistible 
Beauty Aids. Each has some special feature that 
gives you glorious new loveliness. Certified pure. 
Laboratory tested and approved. Only 10^ each at 
your 5 and 10^ store. 




RADIO STARS 



JOAN 

Wh y so «ussy ° bo °^ 
deaning yo«' faCS ' 
\t's late. 




THE lather of Lux Toilet Soap 
is ACTIVE. That's why it pro- 
tects the skin against the enlarged 
pores and tiny blemishes that are 
signs of Cosmetic Skin. If your skin 
is dull or unattractive, choked 
pores may be the unsuspected 
cause. 

Don't risk this modern com- 
plexion trouble! Guard against 
it the easy way thousands of 
women find effective. 

Cosmetics Harmless if 
removed this way 

Lux Toilet Soap is especially 
made to remove from the pores 
every trace of stale rouge and 
powder, dust and dirt. 9 out of 
10 screen stars have used it for 
years because they've found it 
really works. 

Why not follow their exam- 



LOTTY 



, never >eovesto»e 
m „ke-« P on oH n. 

JOAN 

Shot's the harm 



in 



that? 



LOTTY 



Don't yoo know 
stale make-op 
Caging 

causes ogW Cosmet-c 

Skin? I"* To,le ' 
Soap's made to 
guard against .t. 



pie? Use all the cosmetics you 
wish! But before you put on fresh 
make-up during the day— ALWAYS 
before you go to bed at night — 
give your skin this gentle care 
that's so important to loveliness 
— and charm! 



3fargaret Sul/aran 

Star of Universale "Next Time We Live 




mm, 






USE 

metics you wish! 
i avoid Cosmetic 
Skin By removing 

MAKE-UP WITH 

Lux To/let Soap 



3 



My Headache- 
Tired Feeling - 
BANISHED!" 




RADIO STARS 




3 



mBBl 

ISN'T YOUR 
HEALTH WORTH 
THREE MINUTES!" 



I don't consider three minutes of my time 
a very high price to pay for banishing 
headaches and the tired feeling that 
come from constipation. Particularly 
when during those three minutes* you 
simply chew a delicious gum like FEEN- 
A-MINT. Of course, if you aren't will 
ing to spend three minutes, harsh "all- 
at-once" cathartics will have to do. But 
what a difference chewing makes ! With 
FEEN-A-MINT there are no cramps, 
no griping, no bad after-effects! Try the 
three-minute way yourself. Only 15c and 
25c for a large supply. 

ATTENTION, MOTHERS - FEEN- 
A-MINT is ideal for everybody, and 
how children love it! 



* Longer if you care to 



better 
because 

you 
chew it 




RADIO STARS 



CURTIS MITCHELL. EDITOR 

ABRIl LAM4RQIE, ART EDITOR 



New Stories of Popular Stars 

Meet the New Lanny Ross By Anthony Candy 14 

My Adventures in Hollywood By Jack Benny 16 

You Don't Need Beauty (Helen Hayes) By Helen Harrison 25 

Leap Before You Look (Tiny Ruffner) By Dora Albert 26 

Introducing Miss Radio Stars (Neila Goodelle) By Helen Hover 28 

Heaven in the Pines (Visiting Rudy Vallee). .By Mrs. Curtis Mitchell 32 

Too Old to Dream? (Sigmund Romberg) By Jay Kieffer 34 

Miss Hey Nonny Nonny Arrives (Kay Thompson). . By Peggy Wells 35 

The Original "If" Girl (Patti Chapin) 36 

It Started with a Laugh (Willie Morris) By Helen Hover 36 

They Called Him "Pipes" (Stuart Allen) 37 

Jessica (Jessica Dragonette) By Mary Jacobs 42 

Pick and Pat (also Molasses 'n' January) 46 

Special Feature Pages 

Lois Ravel '8 

Helen Hayes 24 

Crazy Caption Contest 30 

Crosspatch 44 

Radio Stars Junior 47 

Junior Journal 48 

The Club Room 49 

Grace Moore 52 

Last Minute News Reel '00 



Novel and Interesting Departments 



The Listeners' League Gazette. 6 

Board of Review 10 

Keep Young and Beautiful.... 12 
For Distinguished Service to 

Radio 19 

Portrait Album 20 



Radio's Merry-go-round 

I Cover the Studios 

Gossip at a Glance 

Radio Stars' Cooking School. 
Programs Day by Day 



Uover by EARL CHRISTY 



Radio Stars published monthly and copyrighted. 1935. by Dell Publishing Co., Inc. Office of 
DUbllcaUon at Washington and South Avenues. Dunellen, N. J. Kxecullve and editorial offices. 
149 Madison Avenue, New York. N. Y. George Delacorte, Jr., Trcs. ; H. Meyer. Vlce-Pres. ; J. 
Fred Henry Viec-Pres. ; M. Uelaeortc. Sec y. Vol. 7, No. 2. November, 1985, printed in U .S. A. 
Single cony prlco 10 cents. Subscription price In the United States, $1.00 a year. hntercd as 
second clas's matter August 5. 1932. at the Post Office at Dunellen. N. J., under the act of 
March 3 1879. The publisher accepts no responsibility for the return of unsolicited material. 



RADIO STARS 



SING THESE 
SONG HITSI 

"'On a Sunday Afternoon" 
"You Are My LuckyStar" 

"Broadway Rhythm" 
"Sing Before Breakfast" 
"I've Got A Feeling 
You're Foolin* " 

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and 'Arthur Freed, com~ 
posers for the original 
"Broadway Melody** 




M-G-M again electrifies the world with 
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JACK ELEANOR 



UNA MERKEL • FRANCES LANGFORD 
SID SILVERS • BUDDY EBSEN 
JUNE KNIGHT • VILMA EBSEN 
HARRY STOCKWELL • NICK LONG, JR. 
A Metro-Go/</wj»-Mayer Picture 

'Directed by Roy Del Ruth ■ Produced by John W. Considine, Jr. 



RADIO STARS 



R. Wilson 
Brown, 
Director 



NATIONAL 
EDITION 



Vol. 1, No. 6 



NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



November, 1935 



LEAGUE TALK 

By Wilson Brown, Director 



I NEVER thought the League 
would have to apologize for 
anything. Yet that is now my 
task. It's about the delay you 
have experienced in receiving 
membership cards. The truth is 
that we are receiving several 
times the number of applica- 
tions we had expected. Each 
one must be handled separately 
which takes time. So we ask 
that you be patient with us un- 
til we have caught up with the 
rush. 

ALREADY many letters are 
arriving pointing out that this 
or that program is not up to 
par. An equal number of let- 
ters are filled with praise for 
programs and artists. It shows 
a decided interest on the part 
of members to realize the pur- 
poses of the League. What we 
ask now is this : In pointing 
out poor or objectionable pro- 
grams, please do not hesitate to 
mention the program by name, 
as your letters will be held con- 
fidential. May we ask that you 
also tell why you think the pro- 
grams poor or objectionable, as 
constructive criticism will be 
the basis for correcting such 
program evils. 

ABOUT your letters : _ Sev- 
eral members in the vicinity of 
New York have telephoned to 
this effect: "/ sent So-and-So 
(naming an artist) a letter in 
care of the League and have 
had no reply." I was talking 
to Honeyboy and Sassafras 
(George Fields and Johnny 
Welsh) of NBC the other day 
and asked them about this sit- 
uation. Their explanation is 
the best I've heard to date. The 
more popular artists, they point 
out, receive hundreds of such 
letters each day. To answer all 
of these letters would require a 
staff of three or four secre- 
taries, the salary of each over- 
aging $25 per week. In addi- 
tion, there is the added expense 
of stationery and postage which 
would total $25 or more per 
week. All together, the cost of 
answering fan mail would be 
more than $100 a week, they 
pointed out. 

Some of the really big name 
artists might be able to afford 
this expense. Sustaining artists 
and lesser lights in the com- 
mercial field, however, cannot 
(Continued on page 9) 




Betty Barthell and three fan- 
friends. Top to bottom: Olga 
Troughton, Jane Greenberg 
(president of the Betty 
Barthell Club), Betty and 
Swen Troughton. 

"NELSON EDDY FAN 
CLUB NEWS" MAKES 
FIRST APPEARANCE 



To League headquarters has 
come the first issue of a mag- 
azine devoted to news of Nel- 
son Eddy, the popular baritone. 
It is titled the "Nelson Eddy 
Fan Club News" and is edited 
by Miss Victoria Mason, 913 
West 29th Street, Wilmington, 
Del. 

An item of unusual interest 
is a reminder that Eddy and 
Fred Astaire made their first 
screen appearance in the same 
film. "Dancing Lady." 

Honorary members of Miss 
Mason's Chapter are announced 
as Jimmie Fidler, Fred Astaire, 
Jeanette MacDonald, Linn Lam- 
bert ( Eddy's secretary) and 
Theodore Paxson (his accom- 
panist). 

FORM ONE CHAPTER 
FOR TWO ARTISTS 

A novel Chapter in flic 
League is the one formed in be- 
half of two artists. It is known 
as Chapter No. 1 of the Lanny 
Ross-Muriel Wilson Artist 
Club and has as its president 
(Continued on page 9) 



LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP 
CONTINUES TO GROW 
BEYONO EXPECTATIONS 



ALREADY IT IS THE LARGEST ORGANIZATION EVER 
TO BE FORMED FOR RADIO LISTENERS 



The Listeners' League of 
America has grown to such 
heights in the few months of 
its existence that it already is 
the largest organization of its 
kind ever to be formed among 
radio listeners. 

The response was immediate 
at the very beginning, nearly 
one thousand members being 
enrolled the first month. Then, 
as the news spread, the applica- 
tions went considerably higher 
than the one-thousand mark. 

Never before in the history 
of radio have listeners so 
readily responded to a move- 
ment designed to improve and 
support the business of broad- 
casting. It is a very definite 
indication, say officials, that 
there is a real need for such or- 
ganized effort on the part of 
listeners to accomplish the best 
in radio entertainment. 

Right now, radio programs 
are on the spot. Listeners are 
writing by the hundreds offer- 
ing suggestions for the im- 
provement of current programs. 
These suggestions are being 
tabulated and will be presented 
soon as constructive opinion. 
The League is attempting in 
this way to be of direct assistance 
to program builders as well as 
to protect listeners from poor 
or objectionable programs. 

Many artists have reported a 
sudden increase in mail re- 
ceived, due largely to the letters 
League members are writing. 
Inasmuch as the amount of mail 
received is one indication of 
the popularity of an artist, the 
League's contribution in this re- 
gard has proven to be a valu- 
able aid to artists. In this and 
other ways the League is at- 
tempting to champion the cause 
of the artists around whose tal- 
ents the business of broadcast- 
ing is built. 

The drive for new members 
continues. Listeners not in the 
League are invited to send in 
their applications as soon as 
possible. In the League they 
will find a voice heretofore de- 
nied them; they will be con- 
tributing to the improvement of 
radio ; and they will be better 



serving their favorite artist. 

For the advantage of those 
not acquainted with the methods 
of organization, the League re- 
peats the rules : 

1. A Chapter is formed by 
ten or more persons. Each per- 
son tills out an individual appli- 
cation blank and the president 
of the groups fills out the 
application for a charter. All 
are mailed together to The 
Listeners' League of America, 
149 Madison Avenue, New 
York City. Membership cards 
will then be sent each indi- 
vidual, and the Chapter will re- 
ceive its Charter and a picture 
of the artist it is supporting. 

2. The Marconi Chapter is 
provided for those individuals 

(Continued on page 9) 



MARCONI MEMBERS 
SEEK AFFILIATION 
WITH REGULAR CLUBS 



Several members of the Mar- 
coni Chapter have signified their 
desire to become members of 
regular active Chapters. It is 
suggested that Chapter presi- 
dents seeking additional mem- 
bers correspond with these in- 
dividuals. The members and 
the artists they wish to support 
are : 

Miss Anna Brnich, 431 E. 
144th St., The Bronx, N. Y.— 
Lanny Ross. 

(ieraldine Calligan, 83 Put- 
nam St., East Weymouth, Mass. 
— Nelson Eddy. 

Mary Gilleh, 60 Clark St., 
Hillside, N. J. — Frank Parker. 

Mary Halloran, 3117 N. 
Spangler St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
— Frank Parker. 

Charlotte M. Bierbower, 1215 
W. 5th St., Hastings, Neb.— 
Al Kavclin. 

Robert Elder, 81 Gibbs St., 
New Haven, Conn. — Fred 
Waring. 

Miss Mary Jane Muscatel, 33 
Clinton Ave., Lambertville.N. J. 
— Lanny Ross. 

Miss Ida Mae Stcngle, 266 
N. Union St., Lambcrtvillc, 
N. J. — Lanny Ross. 



6 



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RADIO STARS 



November, 1935 



THE LISTENERS' LEAGUE GAZETTE 



Page 2 



A FINE TRIBUTE 

TO RUDY YALLEE 



Sophie Tucker, one of Broad- 
way's best known characters, 
pays high tribute to Rudy 
Vallee in the birthday issue of 
"Rudyments," edited by Doro- 
thy Yosnow. It is such a high 
tribute that the League takes 
pleasure in reprinting it for the 
benefit of all Vallee fans. 



"A TRIBUTE TO RUDY VALLEE 
"By Sophie Tucker 

"I am delighted at the op- 
portunity to take my typewriter 
in hand to pay a tribute to my 
dear friend, Rudy Vallee. 

"I have watched Rudy from 
the days of his beginnings in 
the profession, and I have seen 
him grow into one of the great- 
est entertainers in the world. 
And I marvel that today, at the 
very height of his career, he is 
still the same sweet, lovable, 
level-headed and generous boy 
he was when he first came to 
New York from his father's 
drug store in Maine. 

"Our beginnings are strangely 
alike. Rudy's father owned a 
drugstore in New England; my 
father owned a small restau- 
rant in New England. Neither 
of us comes of a theatrical 
family; but we both loved to 
sing and because of that found 
our places in the world. 

"I have worked with Rudy 
many times on his Thursday 
night radio program and 
frankly, I must say that I never 
have and never will enjoy 
working with any one else 
quite as much as I did with 
Rudy. He is so kind, so in- 
telligent, and so generous. He 
is also one of the most cultured 
gentlemen I have met in the 
theater. 

"Rudy knows how much I 
admire and respect him, and I 
think that Rudy loves and re- 
spects me. At least, I hope so. 

"So here's good luck to you, 
my friend. May health and hap- 
piness be yours in abundance." 



"VALLEGIANS" HAVE 
MANY ARTISTS AS 
HONORARY MEMBERS 



"The Vallee Voice," publica- 
tion of "The Vallegians" whose 
president is Beatrice Gordon, a 
member of the League, an- 
nounces a list of honorary mem- 
bers which includes many celeb- 
rities. They are : The Connec- 
ticut Yankees, Charles A. 




Miniature model of Glen Gray's Casa Loma Orches- 
tra made by Harry Hodson, 718 Cinnaminson Ave., 
Palmyra, N. Y., a member of Chapter No. I of the 
Glenn Gray and Casa Loma Artist Club. 



Vallee, Mr. and Mrs. Prosper 
Lenneville, William Vallee, 
John S. Young, Buddy Rogers, 
Mary Brian, Bing Crosby, 
Harry Paul, Major Edward 
Bowes, Alice Faye, Jimmie 
Fidler, Ray Bolger, Ethel Mer- 
man, Sophie Tucker, Mary 
Pickford, Mae Questel, Jesse 
Crawford, Dave Rubinoff, 
James Wallington, Lenore Ul- 
ric and Eddie Cantor. 



CHAPTERS MAY BE 
FORMED FOR SHOWS 
AS WELL AS STARS 



While all Chapters formed to 
date have been in support of 
individual artists, the League's 
policy will permit Chapters to 
be organized in behalf of pro- 
grams. In many cases, it has 
been pointed out, listeners have 
favorite programs whereas they 
do not necessarily have favorite 
artists or do not wish to show 
favoritism to any one artist. 
Those listeners are now invited 
to form Chapters in behalf of 
those programs. 

Listeners who are loyal to 
Lanny Ross, Muriel Wilson, 
Conrad Thibault, Rosaline 
Green, Irene Hubbard and 
other members of the cast of 
Show Boat may, for example, 
organize a Show Boat Chapter. 
Likewise, if the Lux Radio 
Theatre program is a favorite 
of a listener, he may organize 
a Lux Radio Theatre Chapter. 
Regular charters will be issued 
and pictures of the cast issued 
just as is done with Chapters 
formed for individual artists. 



NEWS FLASHES 

OF YO UR FA VORITES 

Lanny Ross, still tops in the 
League as far as the number of 
members is concerned, was 
married July 29th in Millbrook, 
N. Y., to Olive White, his 
manager. 

Betty Barthell is enroute to 
Yokohama, Japan, where she 
will be married October 18th to 
Charles Vaughn formerly of 
Nashville, Tenn., Betty's home. 
They will make their home in 
Shanghai, China, where Mr. 
Vaughn is an official of Pan 
American Airways. 

Leigh Lovel, who played the 
role of Dr. Watson in the Sher- 
lock Holmes sketches on NBC, 
died suddenly in August at his 
home in England where he was 
vacationing. 

James Wallington has left 
NBC where he was an ace an- 
nouncer to become stooge to 
Eddie Cantor on CBS. 

Don Lowe, NBC announcer, 
was married September 7th to 
Lillian Hazel Trotter, radio and 
concert pianist. 

Frank Parker's and Don 
Bestor's absence from the new 
Jack Benny program is due to 
money matters. Both asked 
more than the sponsor was will- 
ing to pay. Michael Bartlett, 
the new singer, came into prom- 
inence after acting with Grace 
Moore in her new movie, "Love 
Me Forever." Johnny Green, 
heretofore a CBS artist, is the 
new maestro. 

It has been announced that 
Annette Hanshaw will be back 
on the air again this month. 



YOUR QUESTIONS 
ANSWERED 



Members are invited to send 
in questions about the League 
which will be answered in this 
column 

Q. How may I secure pic- 
tures of artists? A. The 
League attempts to supply only 
one picture to each Chapter. If 
individual members wish pic- 
tures, they might try writing to 
the artists in care of the League. 
However, there is no assurance 
that the requests will be 
granted. Many artists find it 
too expensive to attempt to 
satisfy all picture demands. 

Q. Is it necessary to have a 
club of my own in order to 
support my favorite artist? A. 
No. If you have a club of ten 
or more members, you are 
eligible for a Chapter charter. 
If you cannot organize a Chap- 
ter, then you as an individual 
are eligible for membership in 
the Marconi Chapter. Just send 
in your application, naming the 
artist you will support. 

Q. If I belong to the Mar- 
coni Chapter may I still join 
one of the regular Chapters? 
A. Yes, if the president of the 
Chapter you wish to join ap- 
proves. Watch this magazine 
for names and addresses of 
Chapter presidents. 

Q. In forming a Chapter, 
should I send in the applica- 
tions as I receive them or wait 
until I have them all and then 
send them all together. A. 
Please send them all together 
in one envelope. 

Q. Will all our names be 
printed in Radio Stars? A. 
We will print as many names 
each month as space permits. 
They will be printed in the 
order in which they were re- 
ceived. 

Q. May I send the League a 
list of members instead of fill- 
ing out individual application 
blanks for each one? A. Rules 
of the League require that each 
person must send in an official 
individual application blank 
which is provided each month 
in this magazine. 

Q. If an already organized 
fan club sends in ten applica- 
tions and gets a charter, does 
that make the club a part of 
the League? A. Only those in- 
dividuals who sent in applica- 
(Contiiiucd on page 9) 



APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP 

LISTENERS' LEAGUE OF AMERICA, 

149 Madison Avenue, New York City, N. Y. 

individual Application for Membership 
I. the undersigned, apply for membership In the Listeners' League nf America 

In support of (Insert name of 

artist whom you arc backing). 



Name 



Street. 
City , 



APPLICATION FOR CHARTER 

LISTENERS' LEAGUE OF AMERICA. 

149 Madison Avenue, New York City. N. Y. 

I. the undersigned, as president of the 

chaptor (Insert name of artist for whom Chapter Is being formed), enrlose ten 
or more Individual membership coupons and apply for a Charter from the 
Listeners" league of America. When this application has heen acted upon. It Is 
understood that each of theso members will receive membership cards and the 

Chapter will receive Its Charier signed bj (Insert name 

of artist for whom Chapter Is formed). 

Name 



Street. 
City . 



8 



RADIO STARS 



LISTENERS' LEAGUE GAZETTE 

LEAGUE TALK 

(Continued from page 6, Col I) 

afford to do this. "Many singers and 
actors," they told me, "do not get as much 
as $100 a week. Even those who do make 
as much as $500 a week could hardly 
afford to spend $100 of that for mail, es- 
pecially when you stop to consider that 
so much has to be spent for music and dra- 
matic lessons, for photographs to supply 
newspaper and magazine demands, for 
script material and special arrangements 
of songs. 

"Every one of us, however, reads every 
letter we receive," they continued. "We 
really do like to hear from our listeners. 
It shows they are loyal to us ; it gives us 
an indication of how our programs are 
being received ; it helps to inspire us to 
do better things. If we cannot answer this 
mail, it certainly is no indication that it 
isn't appreciated. We hope listeners un- 
derstand this." 

That, it seems to me, is a perfectly logi- 
cal explanation to a problem which faces 
every artist. Those of us who write let- 
ters must not expect too much of the ar- 
tists. We know they welcome our letters ; 
even that they want them. We know, too, 
that they are read. 

So it is that the Listeners' League of 
America is serving an additional need — 
being able to give in these columns the in- 
formation which listeners seek and which 
the artists cannot themselves supply di- 
rectly. 



FORM ONE CHAPTER 

(Continued from page 6, Col. II) 

Jo Jaskiewicz, 606 East Fourteenth Street, 
New York City. This chapter is the first 
of such chapters to be organized in be- 
half of more than a single artist. 



QUESTIONS ANSWERED 

(Continued from page 8, Col. IV) 

tions are affiliated with the League. If 
you want your entire club to be in the 
organization, then you must send in a 
blank for each one. 

Q. Can the League supply me with 
tickets to broadcasts? 

A. It is the policy of radio to place the 
matter of tickets in the hands of the 
sponsor of the programs. Therefore we 
suggest that you write direct to the 
sponsor. 



LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP 

(Continued from page 6, Col. IV) 

who find it impossible to organize a group 
of ten or more. In this case, individuals 
merely fill out an application blank, write 
the word "Marconi" on it, and mail to the 
League. A membership card will be sent 
and the individual enrolled in the master 
Chapter which has its headquarters in 
New York. 

3. In the case of fan clubs already 
formed and in operation, all that is neces- 
sary to do for the club to affiliate with the 
League is to have each member fill out 
an application and mail them together with 
the application for a Charter made by the 
president of the club. 

Continuing publication of as many 
names as possible, the League presents the 
following new members : 

(Please turn to page 91) 



■ • 

How he became the 
best-dressed baby in town 



/ As told by \ 
\ Danny 's Mother / 



Little Judy was taking 
a sun bath with my 
Danny. That's how this 
thing started. Judy's 
diaper was so much 
whiter than Danny's, it 
made him look like a 
poor relation. "How 
come, Hazel?" I asked 
Judy's mother. "/ work 
harder than you, but your 
clothes are whiter. " 





"Danny, you get Judy 
out of your hair," Hazel 
grinned back. "And tell 
your mother that she 
works hard enough, but 
her soap is lazy. It just 
doesn't wash out ALL 
the dirt. So her clothes 
are only half-clean — and 
that's why they have that 
tattle-tale gray look." 



It sounded pretty sen- 
sible to me, so I took 
Hazel's advice and 
changed to her soap — 
Fels-Naptha. Glory, 
what a difference! That 
marvelous golden soap is 
so chuckful of nap t ha that 
dirt almost flies out. In 
no time atall, my clothes 
were a gorgeous white 
again. 





And now look at Dan- 
ny — he's the best-dress- 
ed baby in town. His 
clothes, and everything 
else in my wash, look 
simply grand. What's 
more, they're safely 
clean. Fels-Naptha is so 
gentle I use it for my 
very best silk undies. 
And it's wonderfully 
easy on my hands, too! 



,99 



Banish "Tattle -Tale Gray 

with FELS-NAPTHA SOAP! 



) FELS a CO . !»35 



9 



Ii osi ril of review 




Curtis Mitchell 

Radio Stars Magazine, Chairman 

Alton Cook 
N. Y. World-Telegram, N. Y. C. 
S. A. Coleman 
Wichita Beacon, Wichita, Kan. 

Norman Siegel 
Cleveland Press, Cleveland, 0. 
Andrew W. Smith 
News & Age-Herald, Birmingham, 
Ala. 
Lecta Rider 
Houston Chronicle, Houston, Texas 



Si Steinhauser 

Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Leo Miller 

Bridgeport Herald, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Charlotte Greer 

Newark Evening News, Newark, N. J. 

Richard G. Moffett 

Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, 
Fla. 

James Sullivan 

Louisville Times, Louisville, Ky. 



R. B. Westergaard 

Register & Tribune, Des Moines, la. 

C. L. Kern 

Indianapolis Star, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Larry Wolters 

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, III. 

James E. Chinn 

Evening and Sunday Star, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

H. Dean Fitzer 

Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. 



Vivian M. Gardner 

Wisconsin News, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Joe Haeffner 

Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, N. 1 

Andrew W. Foppe 

Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati. 0 

Oscar H. Fernbach 

San Francisco Examiner, San 
Francisco, Cat. 

Jack Barnes 

Union-Tribune, San Diego, Cal. 



+ * + *■ Columbia Symphonic Hour — How- 
ard Barlow conductor (CBS). 

★ ★★★ American Album of Familiar Mu- 

sic with Frank Munn, Vivienne 
Segal and Gus Haenschen's or- 
chestra (NBC). 

★ ★★★ Fleischmann Variety Hour with 

Rudy Vallee and guests (NBC). 

★ ★★★ Paul Whiteman's Music Hall 

(NBC). 

★ ★★★ One Man's Family (NBC). 

★ ★*★ Cities Service with Jessica Drag- 

onette (NBC). 

★ ★★★ Eddie Duchin and his Fire Chief 

orchestra (NBC) 

***■★ Voice of Firestone with William 
Daly's orchestra and mixed chorus 
(NBC). 

★ *** Coty presents Ray Noble and his 

dance orchestra (NBC). 

★ *★★ Waltz Time — Frank Munn, tenor; 

Bernice Clair, soprano; and Abe 
Lyman's orchestra (NBC). 

★ ★★★ Lucky Strike Hit Parade with 

Lennie Hayton, Gogo Delys, Kay 
Thompson, Johnny Hauser and 
guest stars (NBC). 

★ ★★★The Voice of the People (NBC). 

★ ★★★ NBC Symphony Orchestra, Frank 

Black, conductor (NBC). 

*★★★ America's Hour (CBS). 

★ ★★ Radio City Music Hall Concert 

with Erno Rapee (NBC) 

★ ★★ Gulf Headliners with James Mel- 

ton, Revelers Quartet, etc. (CBS). 

★ ★★ Captain Henry's Maxwell House 

Showboat (NBC). 

★ ★* The Shell Chateau starring Al 

Jolson; Guest stars (NBC). 

★ ★★The Adventures of Gracie with 

Burns and Allen (CBS). 

★ ★* Socony Sketchbook — Johnny 

Green and his orchestra; Vir- 
ginia Verrill and Christopher 
Morley (CBS). 



THE LEADERS 

Once again we have the five 
most interesting and popular pro- 
grams as selected by our Board 
of Review. All other programs 
are grouped in four, three and 
two star rank. 

1. **** Palmolive Beauty Box 
Theatre — guest artists ; John 
Barclay, baritone with Al 
Goodman's orchestra. (NBC) 

2. **** Lux Radio Theatre. 

(CBS) 

3. **** Major Bowes' Amateur 
Hour. (NBC) 

4 ★★★★ p orf ] Program with Fred 
Waring's Pennsylvanians and 
Stoopnagle & Budd. (CBS) 

5. **** The Jergens Program 
with Cornelia Otis Skinner. 
(CBS) 

***** Excellent 
★★★★ Good 
*** Fair 
** Poor 
* Not Recommended 



★ ★★ Goldman Band Concerts (NBC) 

*** Bond Bread with Frank Crumit 
and Julia Sanderson (CBS). 

★ ★★ Lady Esther program with Wayne 

King and orchestra (CBS) (NBC). 

*★* Kate Smith 

★ ★★Everett Marshall's Broadway Va- 

rieties with Elizabeth Lennox and 
Victor Arden's orchestra (CBS). 

★ ★★ Manhattan Merry-Go-Round with 

Rachel Carlay, Andy Sannella's 
orchestra (NBC). 



**★ Silken Strings with Charles Prev- 
in's orchestra (NBC). 

★ ★★ A. & P. Gypsies with Harry Hor- 

lick's orchestra (NBC). 

*★★ Contented Program with Gene Ar- 
nold, The Lullaby Lady, Morgan 
Eastman's orch. (NBC). 

★ ★★ Today's Children (NBC). 

★ ★* Sinclair Greater Minstrels (NBC). 

★ ★★ Philip Morris Program with Leo 

Reisman's orchestra and Phil 
Duey (NBC). 

★ ★* "Town Hall Tonight" with Jim 

Harkins and Peter Van Steeden's 
orchestra (NBC). 

*★★ Vic and Sade (NBC). 

★ ★* Death Valley Days (NBC). 

★ ★★Roses and Drums (NBC). 

★ ★★ Boake Carter (CBS). 

★ ★★ Edwin C. Hill (CBS). 

★ ★★ Eno Crime Clues (NBC). 

★ ★★ Climalene Carnival (NBC). 

★ *★ One Night Stand with Pick and 

Pal (CBS). 

★ ★★ Grand Hotel with Anne Seymour 

and Don Ameche (NBC). 

★ ★★ Ben Bernie and his orchestra 

(NBC). 

**★ National Barn Dance (NBC). 

★ ★★ Major Bowes' Capitol Family 

(NBC). 

★ ★★ Penthouse Serenade — Don Mario 

(NBC). 

★ ★★ The Ivory Stamp Club with Tim 

Healy (NBC). 

★ ★★Carefree Carnival (NBC). 

★ ★★ Campana's First Nighter with 

June Meredith and Don Ameche 
(NBC). 

★ ★★ Columbia Dramatic Guild (CBS). 



10 



RADIO STARS 



*★* Hollywood Hotel with Dick Powell and 
Louella Parsons (CBS). 

*★* Heart Throbs of the Hills with Frank 
Luthei, Ethel Park Richardson (NBC). 

★ "Dreams Come True" with Barry Mc- 
Kinley and Ray Sinatra's band (NBC). 

*** Kitchen Party with Frances Lee Bar- 
ton; Martha Mears, contralto; Al and 
Lee Reiser, piano team (NBC). 

**★ Easy Aces (NBC). 

*★* Dream Drama, with Arthur Allen and 
Parker Fenelly (NBC). 

**★ Fireside Recitals; Sigurd Nilssen, basso; 
Hardesty Johnson, tenor; and Graham 
McNamee (NBC). 

★** Stories of the Black Chamber (NBC). 

*★* The Story of Mary Marlin with Joan 
Blaine (CBS). 

*★* The Garden of Tomorrow, featuring 
E. L. D. Gaymour (CBS). 

*** Roadways of Romance; featuring Jerry 
Cooper, Roger Kinne and Freddie 
Rich's orchestra (CBS). 

***Five Star Jones (CBS). 

*** Circus Nights in Silvertown featuring 
Joe Cook with B. A. Rolfe's orchestra 
(NBC). 

*** Fibber McGee and Molly (NBC). 

★ House of Glass (NBC). 

*★* John Charles Thomas and his Neigh- 
bors with William Daly's orchestra 
(NBC). 

*** Tony & Gus (NBC). 

*** Rhythm at Eight — Al Goodman's or- 
chestra (CBS). 

*** Edgar A. Guest in Welcome Valley 
(NBC). 

*** Mexican Musical Tours — Angell Mer- 
cado and his Mexican orchestra (NBC). 

*** Sunset Dreams — Morrin Sisters, Ranch 
Boys, trios (NBC). 

Esso Marketers present Guy Lombardo 
(CBS). 

*** N. T. G. and his Girls (NBC). 
**★ Evening in Paris (NBC). 

★ ** Lud Gluskin Presents (CBS). 

Willard Robison and his Deep River 
orchestra with Loulie Jean Norman 
(NBC). 

*** America's First Rhythm Symphony — 
De Wolf Hopper, narrator (NBC). 

*** Uncle Charlie's Ivory Tent Show fea- 
turing Charles Winninger, Lois Ben- 
nett, Conrad Thibault, Jack and Lo- 
retta Clemens with Don Voorhees and 
his orchestra (NBC). 

*** Hits and Bits (NBC). 

*** "Lavendar and Old Lace" with Frank 
Mvnn and Gus Haenschen's orchestra 
(CBS). 

*** National Amateur Night with Ray 
Perkins (CBS). 

*** G-Men with Phillips Lord (NBC). 

*★* Lanny Ross' State Fair Concert (NBC). 

★ * The Fitch Program with Wendall Hall 
(NBC). 

** Irene Rich for Welch (NBC). 
** Voice of Experience (CBS). 
** Romance of Helen Trent (CBS). 
** The Gumps (CBS). 

** Marie, The Little French Princess 
(CBS). 

** Uncle Ezra's Radio Station (NBC). 
** The Shadow (CBS). 
*★ Seth Parker (NBC). 




BEHIND many a young and 
lovely face is a mind rich in 
mature wisdom. The instinctive 
knowledge women seem to be 
born with. It commands . . ."Stay 
lovely as long as you can." 

So, you pay great attention to 
your complexion, your hair, your 
figure. Your dressing table looks 
like a queen's . . . gay with bright 
jars of creams and cosmetics. And 
if you know all of your beauty 
lore, there'll be in your medicine 
chest a certain little blue box. 

Ex-Lax, its name. And its role 
in your life is to combat one of 
your worst enemies to loveliness 
and health . . . constipation. You 
know what that does to your 
looks! 

Ex-Lax is ideal for you. Because 
it is mild, gentle, it doesn't strain 



your system. It is thorough. You 
don't have to keep on increasing 
the dose to get results. And it is 
such a joy to take ... it tastes just 
like delicious chocolate. 

Get a box today! 10c and 25c 
boxes ... at any drug store. 



MAIL THIS COUPON — TODAY! 
EX-LAX, Inc., P.O. Box 170 
Times-Plaza Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MM-115 PIea9e send free sample of Ex-Lax. 

Name 



(// you live in Canada, write Ex-Lax, Ltd., 
736 Notre Dame St. IV., Montreal) 



When Nature forgets — 
remember 

EX- LAX 



THE ORIGINAL CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 

Tune in on "Strange as it Seems", new Ex-Lax Radio Program. See local newspaper for station and time. 

11 




RADIO STARS 






HER real name is Gabrielle, and she has a 
little angel curl on lier forehead. And when 
she is good I'll warrant she is very good, and 
when she is bad, I'm sure she couldn't be 
horrid. She'd work off her excess spirits in 
activity. She gives an immediate impression 
of vivacity, energy, and a love of living for the joy of it. 
She is animation itself. She is always on the go. And 
you've guessed it! She is Gogo (nickname) DeLys, the 
talented French Canadian songstress who is guest instruc- 
tor on our beauty advice program this month. 

Gogo makes me wonder why fragility and languor and 
pallor ever should have been synonymous with femininity. 
Health, vivacity, and physical perfection should be the 
distinguishing marks of feminine charm. I originally 
sought out Gogo for advice on acquiring (and keeping) 
a beautiful figure . . . and, yes, beautiful legs. You may 
remember that Phil Spitalny, in his selections for an im- 
aginative composite Ideal Miss Radio, specified that she 
should have the figure of Gogo DeLys. 

It didn't take me long to discover Gogo's secret, nor 
did it take any astuteness on my part. Her very activity 
is an explanation of her lithe, luscious figure. Although 
my interview with Gogo happened to come at the end of 
a hectic day for her, and she was "dog-tired," she never- 
theless bobbed up and down showing me her pet cleans- 
ing cream, having me try out the liquid rouge over which 
she is enthusiastic, and then bringing forth with delight- 
fully girlish naivete the gorgeous birthday presents she 
had received (one a gold embroidered robe from China). 
Most anyone else would have considered it her privilege 
to play the languid lady. 

Gogo loves to walk. And whenever she can get to any 
place by walking, she walks. When she lived in Cali- 
fornia, she hiked, and by that I mean "hiked!" City 
pavements aren't conducive to hiking as sport, but even 
12 



keep yoiiiiji 




Highlights and footnotes 
for harmony and health as 
exemplified by Gogo DeLys 

By MARY BIDDLE 



Activity is an explanation of Gogo's lovely figure — a figure 
chosen by Phil Spitalny for the Ideal Miss Radio. Gogo 
loves walking, golf, and dancing, and exercise, naturalness 
and individuality are her creed. It's a good one to follow. 



in New York City she still gets in her regular daily walks. 

Walking is a grand beauty recipe. It doesn't get much 
publicity because it's free. It irons out your mental 
creases and worries, it stimulates your circulation, and it 
helps to prevent the spare tire that is wont to develop in 
insidious fashion around the waistline. Those of you who 
have been developing inferiority complexes over skinny 
legs ought to devote more time to walking. \Y alk ! Play 
golf! Use your legs! These crisp cool days of fall should 
urge you to take a large dose of "walking tonic." 

Golf is Gogo's favorite sport. She tells an amus- 
ing story of how she took up golf. Originally she thought 
of golf only as a bitter pill to take under Doctor's orders. 
It seemed that she was enjoying, very heartily, she assured 
me (though I can't imagine her ever enjoying inactivity), 
a semi-invalid state of just not feeling quite up to things, 
with her mother and friends twittering over her, fixing 
her fancy, appetizing dishes, and plumping up the cushions 
for her. Along came the doctor and brutally said, "Up 
with her! She doesn't need rest, she needs exercise. Off 
with her to the golf links!" And she soon developed a 
regular golf mania which she indulges whenever and 
wherever possible. 

How is she able to spend so much time on her feet 
and not get tired and foot-weary? Well, Gogo believes 
that women should have more consideration for their feet. 
She is frank to admit that she wears a very generous-sized 
shoe, so that her feet are allowed plenty of freedom and 
comfort. Moreover, she will wear nothing but openwork 
sandals around the house, or at the broadcasting studio. 
She shudders at really high heels as bad for health and 
balance. In fact, she honestly would prefer to wear no 
shoes at all when she broadcasts. She confessed to a 
strong secret desire to kick off her shoes every time she 
steps in front of the microphone, so that she could have 
the comforting feeling of broadcasting with her feet on 




Photo by Romaine 

How does she spend so much time 
on her feet without weariness? 



solid ground, as it were. 

After all, when your feet are tired, 
you feel tired all over. Your face 
takes on fatigue lines, too, Gogo be- 
lieves that her fondness for sandals, 
and her care in selecting a comfort- 
able shoe, are the two things most 
responsible for keeping her feet in 
condition to be "always on the go." 
She has a couple of other pet recipes, 
however, in the way of foot bathing 
and massage, that you may find help- 
ful. She finds that bathing the feet 
in warm water to which a large dose 
of pine oil has been added is a grand 
way of making them feel rejuvenated. 
In fact, a luxurious tubbing in a pine 
oil bath is her favorite bathing re- 
cipe. Massaging the feet, especially 
under the arches, with a good bath- 
oil or cold cream, is another aid to 
keeping her feet in condition. 

You may not have occasion to get 
ready for a broadcast, but you may 
well have occasion to dance to one. 
So before you dial the "Carefree Car- 
nival," especially if you've spent a 
hectic day and you're "dead on your 
feet," give yourself a five or ten 
minute relaxation period. Lie down 
on the bed with your feet, not 
your head, (Continued on page 64) 



RADIO STARS 

Praises for Camay from a 

Lovely 




Heres a very pretty person and 
a lifelong friend of Camay — 
at least from the age she could tell 
right from wrong in a beauty soap. 
Her name was Sara Stratton and 
she was married just last fall. 

Her clear and lovely skin is a real 
compliment to Camay's gentle char- 
acter. And another indication that 
Camay's pure and gentle lather 
keeps the feminine skin marvelously 



CAMAY 



soft and beautifully clear. Your veiy 
first use of Camay will show you 
how gentle and mild a fine beauty 
soap can be — how it can help to 
bring new softness and clarity to 
your skin. Camay's low price is 
another pleasant advantage. 

Let Camay bring your loveliness to light. 



C 7%e Sotzft o£ &eau£c$u£ Z(6vne*t 




13 



RADIO STARS 



meet the new 
1 21 ii ii V ross 



a lifted 
syllables 



"LAN NY ROSS presents the Max- 
well House Show Boat . . ." 

Those words have floated out of a 
good many million loudspeakers dur- 
ing the last few weeks. In most 
homes, I dare say, not so much as 
eyebrow has testified to their brave 
Yet, I know of one small room in 
which a lone listener sits on Thursday evenings 
to whom those words mean almost as much as 
the difference between daylight and darkness. 

Last year, it was said like this, you know : 
"Captain Henry's Maxwell House Shozv Boat, 
Lanny Ross, etc. . . ." 

And now it is: "Lanny Ross presents. . . ." 
Not much of a change, is it? Yet, it marks 
the turning point in a man's life — and a 
woman's, too, for all I know. It just happens 
that the man is the most popular singer on 
today's kilocycles, and the woman is a radio 
unknown. Lanny Ross and — but her name will 
come later. 

More important at the moment, to those who 
like to listen to his singing, is this fact : Lanny 
Ross has "come of age." I don't mean in years, 
but in the all-embracing aspect of his person- 
ality and his mind. 

By way of example, I point to the past sum- 
mer months. Until be bad lived them through, 
he was a failure. And yet : 

He was earning three thousand dollars a week. 
He was top man on the Show Boat. 
He zvas collecting five thousand dollars a week 
for personal appearances at conventions and 
in theatres. 

He was presenting his own concert hour in his 
State Fair programs. 

But, despite all that, he had taken a licking — 
two lickings — and the wounds bad not healed. 

Those lickings were administered by Holly- 
wood, not by the public as some of his critics 
would have you believe. The flail of whips 
came when he was on the motion picture lot, 
a stranger in a foreign land, you might say, 
filming "Melody in Spring" and "College 
Rhythm." 

No one ever has denied that Lanny Ross is 
as clean-cut a young American as you'll ever 
see, but, in Hollywood's parlance, be was a 
"stick." Couldn't act, they said. Directors wore 
themselves out attempting to get from him the 
results they got from other Broadway and 
radio recruits. Storming, yelling, driving. . . . 
14 



They should have seen that Lanny doesn't drive. 

So two pictures were offered to the American 
public, starring a Lanny Ross who was about 
as exciting and thrilling as some tailor's dummy. 
Two pictures that flopped with such dull thuds 
that those in the know said once again : 

"I told you so ! Take these radio singers 
away from their mike and they're like babies 
without their bottle." 

That is the wreckage Lanny Ross left behind 
him in Hollywood. The wreckage of a career 
he'd failed in. Oh, I know his friends will pro- 
test that he never has failed, tbat he always has 
had more offers than he could fill, that other 
movie companies have been bidding furiously 
for his services. 

All of which is just dandy, and which proves 
the point I set out to prove. Lanny has bad 
many offers and his financial success has been 
amazing. Yet — and this is the point — he didn't 
go back to the movies until be had done some- 
thing else that is typical of the new adult "come 
of age" Lanny Ross. 

He put himself through the mill. 

What mill ? And why ? 

In White Plains. New York, an earnest group 
of tbeatrical people present Broadway plays 
during the warm months. Its work is profes- 
sional, expert. It uses only the finest material 
and offers the public only top-notch attractions. 
It is typical of a dozen or so little theatres 
which dot the East in the summer. 

Here Lanny found his mill. Here he found 
a laboratory with a test tube big enough to hold 
his tall, broad body. Here, too, the flame of 
public reaction. 

He joined that theatrical company and played 
the lead in a play called "Petticoat Fever." The 
play is one in a million, requiring the star to be 
on the stage almost from first to final curtain. 
In such a play there can be no doubt about the 
chief performer's merit. If he's bad, the play 
seems terrible; if he's good . . . 

Lanny went into the star's dressing-room, the 
star's role. By heart, he had learned the star's 
lines until they were letter-perfect in his mind. 
That first night, in the cool country of West- 
chester County, several hundred people gath- 
ered to look at Lanny Ross. In their minds, 
they called him a singer on a lark. I wonder 
what was in Lanny's mind. 

Something like this, perhaps. For this week's 
work he was receiving a trifling sum — a hun- 
dred dollars, maybe. Already he had spent more 
than that for his costumes. Certainly, he wasn't 



RADIO STARS 

He looked at the years ahead 
and asked himself a question. 
When he had found the an- 
swer, things began to happen! 



BY ANTHONY CANDY 



up here for the money. Nor for the fun, either. Then 
for what ? 

People across the footlights by the hundreds had seen 
him bumble through "Melody in Spring" and "College 
Rhythm." Some of them had said he couldn't act. Were 
they right? Could he really and professionally and gen- 
uinely act? That's why he was there. 

He remembered his first appearance on a public stage. 
It was a small New Jersey theatre into which he had 
been booked because of his early radio following. A 
woman had talked him into that other appearance, insist- 
ing that he needed the experience. She had been right. 

They had gone over to that New Jersey theatre and 
accepted one hundred and fifty dollars. His accompanist 
got half of that, and the man who supplied the micro- 
phone through which he sang got the rest. Before he 
started, he was out of pocket for expenses and com- 
missions. 

But the crowds had come. (Continued on page 63) 

(Left) Here is the new Lanny Ross. He's 
put himself through the mill, and knows 
what he wants to do. (Below) On Thursday 
nights Lanny sings, and there is one who 
listens, with dreams that match his own. 





RADIO STARS 



my /Sid ventures 



GOOD EVENING, folks. 
These movie people have quite a town out 
here. A big town and a little town, a good 
town and a bad town, a wise town and a 
dumb town all rolled into one. I like it. 
I like it, if you want a reason, because you 
can't be lonesome, and in that respect, Hollywood stands 
all alone and at the head of the class. I like it because 
up to now it has been pretty darned good to this son of 
radio. And I like Hollywood, too, because Mary likes it. 

Somebody called this place the world's 
grab-bag ; you stick in your hand and get 
a surprise package that you'll get nowhere 
else on earth. 

For instance, where else can you find 
l)ills-of -fare with such knee-high prices? 
Honestly, one of the first things I noticed 
was that a ten-dollar dinner on Broadway 
came to about two Hollywood dollars. Think what that 
does to a guy whose self-esteem is tied to his pocketbook. 

Sardi's is one of those places. You can get more to eat 
there for ninety cents than anywhere west of the Bowery 
soup kitchens. It's a buffet luncheon where you take 
whatever you want. Eight or a dozen meats, as many 
salads, desserts, coffee, tea. 

Or if you're in a twenty-cent mood you can roll your 
car up to one of the huge drive-in sandwicheries that the 



By JACK 
BENNY 



c/ 

boys have built on almost every other corner. Those 
drive-in places really have to be seen to be believed. If 
ever you're a tourist in Southern California, try it 
yourself. It's an emotional as well as a gastronomical 
experience. 

You're rolling along Wilshire Boulevard, for instance, 
when the pangs of hunger hit you. Over on the right is 
a structure that looks like a cross between the Ford 
building at the Chicago World's Fair and a merry-go- 
round. Usually, it is painted blue or yellow or scarlet. . . . 

Something easy on the eyes — if you're 
wearing dark glasses. 

You roll your car into an opening be- 
tween a Buick from Missouri and a 
Chrysler from Milwaukee. From the air. 
these places must look like a lot of wheels, 
with the cars forming the spokes of the 
wheel and the sandwichery the hub. 
You've just had time to switch off your ignition when 
a Follies dolly in blue and white gingham floats up and 
takes your order. Inside three deep breaths of this won- 
derful sunshine-washed California air, she's back fastening 
a tray to your car-side and filling it with a culinary crea- 
tion that would delight even Primo Camera. All for 
twenty cents. Yeah, as I was saying, I like this town. 

Of course, if you've money to spend and the formal 
clothes to spend it in, the Troc's the place to go. Troc is 




16 



RADIO STARS 



"Its a crazy town 
and a grand town. 
I like it" says 
Jack Benny 



short for Trocadero, which is the 
place to see and be seen in your best 
bib and tucker. Mary and I tried it 
and found as fine a midnight supper 
and show as New York or Chicago 
can offer. Maybe you read about 
that time Garbo went stepping and 
ran into Dietrich and cut her dead. 
That happened there, and I'd give 
one of Bestor's spats to have seen it. 

Probably you already know about 
the Brown Derby ; it's got a lot of 
booths and mostly the male stars eat 
there. And the Vendome with its 
knotty pine tables. Just a low 
building on Sunset Boulevard, but if 
you're ever within a thousand miles, 
there's one thing you oughtn't to 
miss. It is the girl behind the cigar 
counter. 

That girl — I don't even know her 
name — is one of the prettiest things 
I've seen outside the story books. 
Not one star out of ten can match 
her for looks, yet she is selling ci- 
gars. Why? Why isn't she making 
movies? You ask yourself that 





(Top picture) Jack Benny and Mary Livingstone (Mrs. Benny), in 
their new home in Beverly Hiils. (Above) Four ace radio stars, 
Jack Benny, Mary Livingstone, George Burns, and Gracie Allen, 
after a rehearsal of the Benny show in Hollywood. (Left) Jack 
and a group of lassies appearing in "Broadway Melody of 1936." 



question often, as you walk around this town. Beauty is all over 
the place, selling sandwiches, cigars, waiting on tables. Kids burn- 
ing with ambition, waiting for their chance in the flickers. They'll 
get it, someday, and then they'll either click big or go back to some 
decent guy who'd rather have plain Jane Doe for his honey than a 
Marlene or a Jean. 

One of the crazy things that happen to you out here is people. 
In radio, you know, you go to the studio the day of your broadcast 
and rehearse for a few hours. That night you put on a show and 
then go back home. Maybe, during the dozen hours you are about, 
you see some people you know. Afterwards, you don't see anyone 
but strangers or friends from some other field. 

Hollywood is different. You eat movies, sleep movies, smell 
movies. I think it is because the town is small and you're con- 
tinually rubbing elbows with folks you know almost well enough to 
kid. And let me tell you, you can't rub elbows with some of them 
without something happening to you. (Continued on page 66) 

17 



RADIO STARS 




RADIO STARS 




D'Gaggeri Studio 

Here is Bill Bacher, creator 
and director of this fine pro- 
gram, "Hollywood Hotel." 



Stars of the "Hollywood Hotel" (left to right), Anne 
Jamison, Louella Parsons and Dick Powell, dining 
together at The Cocoanut Grove, Los Angeles. 



fur <listiii<|iiislieil service to railio 



Salute! 

To "Hollywood Hotel"! 

To Dick Powell, Frances 
Langford, Igor Gorin, Anne 
Jamison, Raymond Paige and 
all the other celebrities who 
have spun their webs of words 
and music across America. 

Salute to one other, too, 
whose name you never have 
heard but whose efforts have 
lifted this famous show to the 
week's brightest spot for millions of fans. 

The man Bill Bacher! 

Bill Bacher is a veteran of radio, one of 
those unsung heroes whose deeds die in the 
studio. They say he knows more radio than 
most men forget. Our October issue last year 
told his thrilling story under the title of "Little 
Man, What Next?" Though we didn't then 
know it, "Hollywood Hotel" was next. 

The same "Hollywood Hotel," if you remem- 
ber, that gave you the ingratiating cadences 
of Dick Powell's tenor, the sweep of Jane 
Williams' soprano, the laugh antics of El 
Brendel, the heroics of Louella Parson's 
visiting motion picture stars and yet 




. . . yet . . . wasn't quite the 
show it should have been. A 
million-dollar show, that's what 
it was, that sounded like a re- 
lief worker's pay check. 

Remember when they made 
some changes last Spring? 
New voices, new ideas, giving 
the whole old idea of Holly- 
wood Hotel a new brilliance. 
That was Bacher's doing. The 
1936 streamlined super- 
charged "Hollywood Hotel" that today is and 
sounds like a million-dollar show still is his 
doing. 

So, for the first time since we commenced 
designating persons and programs as worthy 
of RADIO STARS Magazine's medal, we select 
a backstage broadcasting veteran for the 
recipient of it. 

Because The Hollywood Hotel Program is 
one of broadcasting's great shows and 
because his efforts are in large measure re- 
sponsible for it, we give to William Bacher, 
radio director and producer, and creator 
of this program, this month's Award 
for Distinguished Service to Radio. 




19 




f mil ccs I ai ii ij ford 

High-hatting her friends? No-no! Not Frances Langford. Since her rise to radio 
fame on Rudy Vallee's hour, Frances' sweet contralto crooning has won countless 
admirers along the airlanes. Here she is in her role in "Broadway Melody of 1936", 
a musical extravaganza starring Jack Benny and featuring other notable stars of 
radio, stage, and screen. Frances now is being groomed for a starring role. 



21 



He may be at the foot of the ladder in this picture, but in real life Everett 
Marshall is so near the top all he can do for excitement is to scale the heights 
from another sidel For four successful seasons Marshall sang in Grand Opera. 
Musical Comedy lured him. Then Movies. Radio heard him in Broadway Varieties. 
Now he is starring with Dolores Del Rio in a new picture, called "I Live for Love." 




Baritone star of the Philip Morris Program, Philip Alexander Duey 
rejoices to see the increased popularity of classical music on the 
air although most of his own songs are of the popular variety. He 
is as sincerely interested in the future of radio as he is in his 
own persona! future. This Fall you will be hearing him in his 
first big dramatic as well as singing role, starring in a new 
program with the "Men About Town," with Aldo Ricci's orchestra. 



23 




Success is 



"HERE must be much 
[o learn from a woman 
dio never has come 
>ut second best ! 

Tiny Helen Hayes, 
nth pleasant but not 
(too-regularl features, 
las come to be 
cnown as America's 
leading actress, 
[Hollywood's ace 
Iperformer (she 
Swon a movie award 
J for the year's best 
performance in 
1933) and radio's 
I foremost dramatic 
star! Everyone, it 
seems, is a Hayes 
fan! 

What are her 
thoughts ? Her aims ? 
Her ambitions? May- 
be we can profit by 
her experience. 

In Sir James Barrie's 
'Dear Brutus," her first, 
real success as a come- 
dienne, and in "Coquette," 
the tragic play of a small 
town Southern girl (in which 
Mary Pickford appeared on the 
screen), she displayed her wide 
range of characterization and the 
emotional powers which will give her 
enduring fame as one of the great American 
actresses of all time. 

Ask her what is most important in the 
make-up of an actress and, without hesi- 
tation, her answer is : "A love of people and 
a relish of life itself — humanity. . . . Con- 
centration and the gift of relaxation . . . An ability to 
work hard and the capacity for a vision and a dream . . . 
In a word, understanding." 

"People," she explained, "always interest me. . . . For 
instance, several years ago, a woman travelled opposite 
me on a bus. There was nothing startling about her, but I 
found myself wondering why she had bought the par- 
ticular hat she was wearing, why she was talking in a 
certain way. Then, not long ago, I was given a role which 
brought that woman clearly to mind again and I found 
her very valuable in building a character, dressing her 



only loving your 




work, says Helen Hayes 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




Helen and Charles Mac- 
Arthur are devotees of 
amateur photography. 



to type and in talking as 
a woman such as she 
would talk — making 
her believable." 
On either side of the 
footlights she is a 
fascinating person — 
delightful actress, 
good little trouper, 
loyal friend, de- 
voted wife and 
mother. As Mrs. 
Chas. MacArthur 
of Nyack, her 
charming and well- 
run Victorian home 
is the centre of 
many brilliant 
gatherings of dis- 
tinguished guests. 
It is a haven of 
refuge for Chicago's 
star newspaper-man 
turned dramatist and 
successful screen pro- 
ducer, for the star, 
Helen Hayes, and for 
six-year-old Mary Mac- 
Arthur, their small and 
unsuspecting daughter — un- 
suspecting, that is, of being the 
pride and joy of two very fa- 
mous people who happen to be her 
parents. 

"Charlie and I are grand friends and 
sweethearts, too," she said, meditatively, 
tugging at the brim of her hat with the 
nervous little habit she has — I suspect to 
keep it down over a face too famous for 
comfort. "I do want to be attractive to him, 
but 1 never make too much of an effort. 
The important thing, I believe, is how you think — for 
thinking registers. . . . You come to look and even sound 
pretty much like the person you really are 1 " 

Nothing could give you a better insight into the sort 
of person Helen really is than her relation towards those 
with whom she works. A veteran of the Vallee hour and 
headliner on several occasions of the Lux Radio Theatre 
show, it was not so long ago she presented herself for 
the first rehearsal of her very first broadcast. 

Around the room stood several small straight-back 
chairs for everyone, while a large ( Continued on page 71) 

25 




BY DORA ALBERT 




Tiny Ruffher and John Barclay give 
little, Miss Francia White a lift. 




Y( >l' sit at your disk, your shoulders hunched, 
your face hitter with conflicting (.'motions, 
wondering why you've l)cen such a Hop. While 
other men went ahead and found the pot of 
"gold at the rainbow's end, you've found life 
hard and niggardly and mean. And you don't know 
why. You've worked lflse^a Roman galley slue. And 
been so cautious. So very. v«y cautious. You've never 
taken terrible risks, or gambled everything on a whim of 
fate. And yet you're a failure. In th^name of all that's 
merciful, why ? x 

Maybe that's why. The risks you didn't- take defeated 
you. You played a snail's game, not a man's. x You played 
for nickels and threw away the rich fortune that was 
your life. Reverse vour motto. Don't look before you 
leap. Tiny KufTncr, announcer and director of Show 



A 



Hall 

\ 



Boat, the Palmolive show and Fred Allen's Town 
program, is on top of the world today be- 
cause he leaped before he looked. 

Didn't he get into trouble doing that? Of 
course he did! He threw awav money; he 
threw away jobs; he threw awav. at the 
drop of a hat. everything that men hold dear. 
And once, because lie leaped hefore he looked, 
because he risked everything tor an idea, men hated him, 
reviled him. called him every contemptuous name they 
could think of. He knew what it was to he afraid of his 
life by day; and to skulk in his home like a wounded cub 
at night. Men's hatred reared a hitter barricade between 
him and them. The people he had loved hest shunned 
him as though he were a leper, an unclean thing. 

But hefore I tell you about that, I want you to gel 



a picture. of Tiny Ruffner, six feet five and every inch 
a man. . 

He comes of pioneering stock, men who didn't seen 
the cautious, easy way of doing things. 

l'Xr hack, his folks on his mother's side were hrave 
Sc^ts who sailed from Scotland on windjammers. They 
laMghed at the people who said it couldn't he done. Far 
hack in history, his father was descended from a man 
named I'eter Ruffner, the second son in a Swiss family. 
Two hundred and seventy years ago in Switzerland, the 
.eldest son inherited everything, the second son not a 
Swedish penny. So I'eter Ruffner, turning his hack on 
' the traditions of his people, said. "If I stay here, nothing 
j will ever happen to me." And with that he sailed for 
C harleston. South Carolina. 

In the blood of the Ruffners was eagerness for advem 
I lure. They moved farther and farther West, when the 
West was strange and pioneer territory. 

Into this family, in Craw fordsville. In- 
diana, Tiny was horn — named Edmund J. 
Ruffner. At thirteen he shot up suddenly, 
tall and very lean, till it seemed as if his 
body would not be strong enough to carry 
the full height of him. Though tall, he was 
very frail, thin as a gangling string bean. There was no 
strength in his arms and shoulders. His mother watched 
over him solicitously. 

At seventeen Tinv started on his career of leaping 
headlong into difficulties. 

( hie dav he came home and announced proudly that he 
had got a job as riveter in a ship-building company. His 
mother had a swift vision of what the work would l>c 



Tiny Ruffner did it-and he landed high and handsome 

26 



Jean Paul King, Celia Babteock of 
the "House of Glass" cast, and Tiny. 



\ 

like. For ships were being turned out then like ^o many 
sausages, and the work was horribly dangerous. The 
mortality rate in the shipyards was very high. 

"Tiny," she said, horror in her eyes, "you cant do 
that. Remember you're not as strong as most boys. 
You're our only son, Tiny. Why do you want to taH<e 
such a dangerous job? You mustn't do it!" \ 

But Tiny was past remembering, or hesi- 
tating. If life was going to keep him a \ 
weakling, a boy who couldn't compete with \ 
the other boys, he would have none of it. 

"It's all right, mother. Nothing will hap- 
pen to me," Tiny said, grinning at her fondly. 

With white hot rivets he worked all day. so fast that 
the eye could hardly follow his movements. Do you 
know how riveters work? Have you ever seen them, one 
man driving the rivet, while a man on the other side, 
called the bucker-up, holds on to it? One day the man 
who was working as Tiny's partner missed the rivet, and 
the plunger hit Tiny on the forehead. Tiny was knocked 
out cold. He fell twelve feet off the scaffold on to the 
steel deck. 

The men gathered anxiously around Tiny. Only too 
often they had seen accidents like this happen. Men 
maimed and miserable for life. Their faces were wet 
with sweat, their lips mute with pity. 

But fortunately for Tiny, he had been wearing a cap 
with a visor, and the hat bad broken the blow of the 
rivet. Otherwise his skull would have been smashed. As 
it was. he just picked himself up, dusted himself off. and 
asked a bit incoherently: "What happened*" They told 
him — marvelling that he could be alive to ask ! 



"Tiny" (real name Edmund) RufTner 
was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana. 



"I guess tha^s'enough for today. I'll go home now." 
So he stumbled home. But the next day he was back 
at work. ' 

All this took physical courage. But that was nothing. 
It's not so hard to leap before you look when all 
you're risking is your life. But far, far worse and far 
more bitter is it to face the hatred of men, 
poisonous, searing, blind hatred, because 
you've stood by something you l)elieved in. 
When Tiny was about eighteen he was 
working for the Bolcon Canal Lumber Com- 
pany in Seattle. The men struck for higher 
wages and got them. Tiny was with them. 
Suddenly into the picture came a bunch of Red agitators, 
inflaming the hatred of the men, poisoning their minds, 
fomenting trouble. 

"You struck for higher wages and got them. That's 
fine," they said. "Now strike again. Strike while you 
have the chance. Strike for shorter hours." 

The men, who had l>een delighted when the company 
granted their demands, began to grumble among them- 
selves. Slowly discontent spread in their ranks. Led on 
by a group of agitators, they went on strike again. 

"Don't do it," Tiny Ruffner begged them. "The com- 
pany's played ball with us. Let's play ball with them. 
They gave us the raise we asked for on condition that 
we make no more trouble." 

"Why. you so-and-so," the men told him, their faces 
harsh with contempt. "So you're on the side of the 
company now !" 

No one w r ould listen to him. Now if Tiny had had 
any sense at all, when he found (Continued on pa</c 93) 



on top of the world! Here is his surprising story 

27 



RADIO STARS 



Was a career so important? 
Neila sometimes wondered. 
Was Mother always right? 




Neila was to be a concert 
pianist — to win the fame and 
glory her mother had missed. 



Ray Lee Jackson I'hotORrai 



introducing 




radio 



A lovely girl in her early twenties, who knows just 




"1 MIGHT have been- 



You've heard it before. Perhaps those words 
have plagued you, too. There's no expression 
which covers so much defeat, so much futility 

A young mother who saw her 
promising singing career nipped by 
an early marriage stared at her baby girl sleep- 
ing in the crib and promised: "She never will 
be a 'might have been' like myself."" And be- 
cause of that desperate vow Neila Goodelle to- 
day is a star. She's the radio newcomer who 
does cute things with her voice and a piano Sunday eve- 
nings on the NBC net work for the Cutex Company. 

She got there because she followed Mama's advice. 
True, if she had gone ahead in her own young, impulsive 
way she would have been a Missus today with, perhaps, a 
couple of button-nosed, gray-eyed youngsters resembling 
her. Hut mama said: "Turn your back on marriage if 
it interferes with your career, then you'll never regret." 

28 



So Neila, being a dutiful dotter, did turn her back. 
Once it was to a laughing tow-haired college boy whose 
father owned half the town. The second time it was to 
a gilt-edged movie star — the Hollywood variety, you 
know, with a string of ponies and half the fe- 
male population mooning over him. Then it 
By HELEN was a prominent professional man who could 
have given Neila social position and money. 
HOVER Each time that Neila was on the verge of 

taking the Lohengrin leap there came the after- 
midnight talk with mama, at the end of which 
she would sigh, then slip the ring from the finger and send 
it back. 

Did Mama know best? 

Neila thinks so now. Hut you'll have a chance to decide 
for yourself. 

To Mrs. Goodelle, Neila is her second chance. The 
fulfillment of what she herself "might have been." She 
planned her daughter's life (Continued on pane 75) 



RADIO STARS 



Where does she get her old-fashioned 
common-sense, Broadway wonders, f-or 
Neila never yet has "gone Broadway." 






stars... 



how her future will work out 



Once each year RADIO STARS Magazine designates 
a young American girl and a young American boy as 
the most talented of the younger crop of stars. We 
do this with the hope that our finger-pointing will lift 
them above the crowd of clamoring, capable new- 
comers. 

We hope that the friendship they will find among 
our readers will help them to reach the goal of their 
desires. Now, calling her Miss Radio Stars of 1935, 
we name as our first choice of the year the capable 
young lady who undertakes single-handed to enter- 
tain us on the Cutex program, Miss Neila Goodelle. 
We know you like her singing— and we hope you'll like 
her story. A story of a typical American girl and a 
lot of uncommon sense. — The Editor. 



A very famous 
movie star 
begged Neila 
to marry him. 



Photograph by Maurice Seypiour 



RADIO STARS 




Amos 



Andy 



a* I 



Contest it open to anyone living in United States or Canada with exception 
of employees of RADIO STARS Magazine and Paramount Pictures, Inc. 
Contestants must submit two sets of Crazy Captions and Pictures, one set 
to be printed in October issue and one in November issue of RADIO STARS 
Magazine. 

Contestants must correctly identify captions with personalities as presented 
in "The Big Broadcast of 1936." 

In fifty words or less, tell which radio star's performance in the "Big 
Broadcast of 1936" you enjoyed most and why. 

Your letters and both sets of captions and photographs or facsimiles thereof 
must be mailed to Crazy Captions Contest, RADIO STARS Magazine, 149 
Madison Ave., New York City, in one envelope or package, before November 
1st. 1935. 

Prizes will be awarded to those contestants who most correctly connect the 
crazy captions with the photographs or facsimiles thereof of the radio 
personalities appearing in the motion picture, "Big Broadcast of 1936," and 
who tell most clearly and interestingly in fifty words or less which radio 
star's performance they enjoyed in the "Big Broadcast of 1936" and why. 
Judges shall be the editors of RADIO STARS Magazine. 
In case of ties, each contestant will be awarded the prize tied for. 
Contest shall close the last day of October, 1935. 



1st Prize 
$250.00 cash 

3rd Prize 
A $75.00 radio 



2nd Prixe 
$100.00 cash 

4th Prize 
A dressing-table radio 



5th Prize 

Ten Mai Factor MAKE-UP KITS to the ten next 
best answers. 

6th Prize 

100 $1.00 bills to the one hundred next best 
answers. 



7th Prize 

50 Maz Factor Lipsticks to the 50 nezt best 
answers. 



8th Prize 

50 Decca-Bing Crosby Phonograph Records to 
the 50 nezt best answers. 



9th Prize 

100 sheets ot "Big Broadcast of 1936" music 
to the nezt best 100 answers. 



30 



RADIO STARS 




Grade Allen 



0 you want to win a prize? 
4^ Here's a corking contest ! 

It started last month — in the October issue 
— but if you haven't it, you can get a copy of that 
issue from this office. (Both sets must be submitted 
together to compete for the prizes.) 

Here's the story : Above are four pictures of 
radio and movie stars. They all appeared in Para- 
mount's great picture, "The Big Broadcast of 
1936". They sang songs and spoke lines. Now 
look at the captions printed in the balloons that 
come out of their mouths. 

Just between us, they're all saying the wrong 
things ! They're saying lines or words of songs 
that somebody else used in "The Big Broadcast". 
That's why we call this "Crazy Caption Contest". 

What you must do, if you want to win one of 
the fine prizes offered, is to get to work with shears 
and paste, or pen and ink, and put the right words 
in the right mouths. 

See "The Big Broadcast of 1936", or ask some- 
one who has seen it. Then put the right captions in 
the right places. That's the first half of your job. 
The rest is this: 

In fifty words, or less, write a paragraph stating 



which radio star's performance you enjoyed most 
in "The Big Bsoadcast of 1936", and tell why you 
enjoyed it. Write as interestingly as you know 
how. 

Then mail the two sets of pictures, or facsimiles 
thereof, with the captions properly placed, and your 
fifty-word letter, to this address : 

CRAZY CAPTION CONTEST 

Radio Stars Magazine, 149 Madison Ave., New York 

There are 314 prizes — cash, make-up kits, radios 
and music. . . . Just look at that thrilling list on 
the opposite page ! 

The contest is easy to enter and easy to win ! 
Remember — send in together both sets of pictures 
(one from October and one from this issue) with 
correctly placed captions, either clipped from the 
magazines or facsimiles of them, and your fifty- 
word letter. 

And you have until the last day of October to 
do it. 

Again we remind you — 314 stunning prizes, 9 
simple rules — get going and try for a prize ! 



31 



Do as you please, and be happy," is Rudy's rule for 



■k^B AN invitation to Rudy Vallee's hideaway 
[kjMLJ lodge in the heart of the green lake country 
|*^/^ of Maine is the sort of thing calculated to 

im. jfl ;ul(i a 1)eat to an - v .? irl s P u ' se rate - When 
B ™ my editor-husband came home with the 

news that Rudy had invited us up for a" week-end. I 
started packing with a whoop. 

Rudy Vallee Lodge is famous among the New 
England folk sixty miles northwest of Portland, Maine, 
but to me it was hardly more than a vague rumor. I 
remembered reading something of its incredible bath- 
rooms, of the Fifth Avenue kitchen transplanted to the 
heart of the wilds, of a cold, blue lake almost at world's 
end. 

Long before we reached the lake we felt the cleanness 
and calmness of this north, country. 

As we drove, I wondered if the Rudy Vallee of 
Maine would be different from the Rudy Vallee of 
Radio City. I knew he had a reputation for thorough- 
ness and attention to detail. Already, we had tangible 
evidence of it in the map we had sent us. It was a 
mimeographed sheet of white paper with the route from 
New York to his lodge carefully sketched. The last 
eight miles were in detail : 

"Leave tar road . . . 



By MRS. CURTIS MITCHELL 



"Pass cemetery on right . . . 

"Country club on left . . . 

"Bridge . . . 

"Don's gate . . 
By this time we were rolling slowly up a hillside on 
a road which would not permit two cars passing. The 
Jack pines were closing about us. In the distance, we 
glimpsed mountain tops. Then, on the right, we saw 
the gate. 

It bore no name to show it belonged to Rudy Vallee 
but I knew it was his. I think the signs told me — that 
and my memory of his reputation for thoroughness. 
Grey stone made formal bases for a wide steel gate. 
We slowed down to read the signs. 

One was a warning to uninvited guests who were 
promised immediate arrest by officers on duty if they 
intruded. Evidence that even here a public hero found 
it difficult to escape from his admirers. Another cau- 
tioned against dropping lighted cigarettes from the car 
— good advice, indeed, for a constant threat to that 
immense forest of pines is fire. Another requested lis 
to proceed slowly and with care. The road — one mile 
of it to the border of the lake and the lodge buildings — 
had been driven through the forest. Rudy had erected 
a street sign at its beginning. It was called, with a 

The Pirate's Den, at the lake's edge, 
is playroom and boathouse combined. 






guests at his lodge in Maine. But is Rudy happy? 



considerable show of humor, the "Rue de la Paix." 

Then we found the lodges. Four jolly-looking 
shingled houses situated on a couple of acres of cleared 
ground. At three sides was nothing but fragrant pines ; 
at the fourth, the lake itself. 

Several people were swimming about the float. A 
man with a face like the map of Maine came toward 
us. We asked for Rudy. 

"He won't be here until in the morning." 

"Who's in charge ?" 

"I am." 

And that is the way we met Henry — last name un- 
known. Henry is a Maine veteran who lives at the 
lodge winter and summer and looks after the place. 
Before we left we discovered that he was a very nice 
guy — as nice a guy as ever took a lady riding in the 
rear seat of a speed boat and then dumped her lap full 
of lake water with his whirling dervish turns. I liked 
it after I got over being petrified but I'm afraid my 
own enthusiasm never quite equalled Henry's. Next 
day I saw him initiate all the other guests in the same 
damp fashion. 

Two other people come to mean a lot to you at the 
Vallee Lodge. One is Theresa and the other is Manuel, 
Irish and Latin-American respectively. Theresa shows 



Here is Rudy, with (left) his brother, 
Bill Vallee, and (right) his father. 



you things and places and has charge of the houses. 
Manuel waits on table, stands by with a fresh drink for 
whoever is thirsty and does whatever else the perfect 
butler does. Theresa and Manuel, and Nora, the per- 
fect cook, are the only servants who go back to New 
York with Rudy in the winter. 

The Main Lodge is large and friendly. It is the night 
headquarters of all. Which is as it should be, for a 
billiard table and a bar offer their seductive pleasures. 
Adjoining, a tremendous hall with a fireplace at the end 
holds the deepest-cushioned chairs north of Boston. 
Next, with another giant fireplace, is the main dining- 
room. Then the kitchen, and such a kitchen you've 
probably never seen. Upstairs were the bedrooms. 

They aren't large— just big enough — but nothing has 
been omitted. Lambskin rugs, on the polished pine 
floors, are the softest, soothingest things for chilly feet 
I've ever experienced. Crepe de Chine spreads for the 
twin beds, bearing the host's embroidered farewell, blue 
silk letters spelling "Bonne Nuit." 

A reading-lamp at the head of the bed, cigarettes and 
cleansing tissues in a dressing table drawer, hangers in 
the closet, lighter, freshly filled ; pen, ink, and specially 
printed stationery with a picture of each Lodge on 
it. And, more than that, it {Continued on page 67) 




* 



Deems Taylor confers 
with Sigmund Romberg 
on their Swift program. 




Kuiiolf H. Holiin.ir 



too olil to lire a 111 ? 



Take the world as you find it," says Sigmund Romberg 




B 
K 



Y 

I E 



who didn't. 



THERE is a popular belief 
that all really great artists five 
in chilly attic rooms, with their 
pockets and stomachs chron- 
ically emptv. Here is one 
He never was broke, he never was hungry. 
He always could look at a good steak smothered in mush- 
rooms without reminiscing over winter nights when he 
longed for one just like it. He can truthfully sav ! "I ve 
never struggled." 

Sigmund Romber's lather. Adam Romberg, was rich, 
manager of three Hungarian chemical factories, when 
his first son was born. He was pleased; little Sigmund, 
he beamed, would grow up and some day take his place 
at the factory. But Frau Romberg was of another mind. 
Ever since her marriage she had lived constantly with 
fear — fear that an explosion might some dav occur and 
her husband would be brought home to her a corpse, 
Their son must never face that danger; they could give 
him every opportunity in some less hazardous profession. 

The boy grew up amid the pageantry of old Vienna. He 
learned to dance the mazurka and schottische with grace 
and gallantry, as was an accepted part of every Viennese 
youth's education. Prep school gave way to university. 
Now Sigmund realized fully what his parents planned 
for him. He was to be an engineer, a bridge builder — 
that would please them 

Well, he would try. But happiness did not really begin 
for him until every prosaic textbook had been put away 
and he was in the nearest beer garden. Whirling about 
under the linden trees to bright music, returning flushed 
and warm to blow the foam from a brimming stein, mak- 
ing speeches to a pretty face— that was his element Al- 
ways he wanted to be where there was music. It seemed 
a part of life from which he never could long absent 
himsel f 

He felt himself an alien in the silent corridors of the 
university. He hated the dull classrooms with their smell 

34 



JAY °f cn alk and dust. Draftsmanship 
irked him most of all. He designed 
F F E R monstrosities when be tried to picture 
grace and beauty. In sheer despera- 
tion he would turn to the back of the 
book and sketch a clef surrounded by sharps or flats. In 
music, it was easy for him to achieve grace and beaut v ; 
gay melodies seemed to drip lavishly from his pen. He 
would forget monuments and towers and arches to send 
some haunting or tuneful waltz to a contest. 

And more often than not he won. By the time he was 
fifteen his tunes were as much admired in Vienna's draw- 
ing-rooms as his |M>or sketches were derided throughout 
the university. Kveryone except his own parents realized 
that Sigmund Romberg would never l>e able to fill the role 
chosen for him — and that he was destined for one much 
greater. 

But within a year even his father and mother were to 
be as certain of this as the whole world is now. I'roudlv 
they watched him conduct the seventv-piece orchestra of 
the Budapest College of Music in a performance of one 
of his own compositions. His gift was too strong to be 
denied ; they allowed him to withdraw from college and 
devote his time to music 

Success was instantaneous. All of Budapest twirled 
and dipped to the melodies of a seventeen-year-old boy. 
A big city bowed before its youngest composer — all except 
the first real love of Sigmund Romberg's life. For years 
she had been the girl next door, the flaxen-haired fraulcin 
who accompanied him to picnics and concerts. 

Now she stood before him, grown-up, smiling, radiantlv 
beautiful. "She was dressed in white, and the feather 
fan she carried waved nervously hack and forth as she 
congraulated me," he said dreamily. "Her name? That 
doesn't matter. I'll tell you how 1 won her and how 1 
lost her. That should be enough. . . . She used to ride 
around Budapest on the handle-bars of my bicycle. That j 
was when 1 was still wearing (Continued on /uu/f o(h 



miss hey nonny nonny arrive 

Kay Thompson sings and 
^ handles all the choral 
work for the Hit Parade 




BY PEGGY WELLS 





A SMART girl, Kay Thompson. When she 
was sixteen she appeared as piano soloist with 
the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. When 
she was eighteen she was earning $125 a 
week singing with a band. When she wanted 
a trip to California, she wangled herself a 
job on the Catalina Islands. And when you and I and 
other little girls were debating how we could stick dad up 
for an extra five dollars to buy that sumptuous perfume 
Susie had. Kay was earning forty-five dollars a week 
playing the piano after school. 

None of this came running to reddish-haired, outspoken, 
lanky Miss Thompson, who has such an important 
singing role on the Lucky Strike Hit Parade. No sir, she 
went out and grabbed it, on nerve, and nothing else but. 
Riding gloriously over such setbacks as being fired from 
her first commercial. 

It happened because she was late for a broadcast. At 
a party, forty miles from station KMOX in St. Louis, 
she was having the time of her young life. When her 
escort, Jimmie, tapped her arm and reminded her that 
she was supposed to be on the air in ten minutes. 

"We made the forty miles in thirty minutes, doing 
eighty an hour," Kay told me. "Sure we got there late, 
but the broadcast was still on. I hopped up to the mike. 
-Michael Charles, the orchestra leader, was furious. He 
just glared at me." 

To make matters worse, she had forgotten her music. 
Taking a slip of paper, she wrote : "Play Some of These 
Days in G Minor." That wasn't what the boys had re- 
hearsed, but they faked it as well as they could. Kay 
sounded awful. 

It was just her bad luck that the director of the Phillip 
66 Gasoline Company listened in that night. And sent a 
telegram : "Keep Band But Dismiss Vocalist." 

Did Kay care? Not Kay. "I was young and foolish," 
she told me. "That was my first commercial. I felt 
sponsors were as thick as fish in the pond. We just went 
back to the party and had a swell time." And she laughed. 



Personality, plus a gift for music, 
started Kay Thompson on her career. 



Then there was the time when sixteen-year-old Kay 
electrified her father and mother by coming home with 
forty-five dollars for a week's work, playing the piano 
three hours a day after school. 

How did it happen? Piano has always been Kay's 
forte : since she was four years old she took piano lessons, 
practicing four or five hours a day. In her early 'teens, 
she was already an accomplished pianist. A friend of 
her sister's conducted an exclusive dancing school. Sud- 
denly this girl found herself without a pianist, a few 
weeks before her recital. 

To Kay she came. "How much do you want for play- 
ing for me?" she asked the child. 

Kay didn't know anything about prices, but her own 
teacher charged three dollars an hour. 
"Three dollars an hour," Kay replied. 
"Goodness," said the other. "Who do you think you 
are, Paderewski ?" 

Kay knew the dancing teacher was in a tight spot. 
"That's my price," young Miss Thompson answered, 
firmly. 

"O. K. you little Big Shot. I'll have to give it to you." 

Which she did. "That was the first money I ever 
earned." Kay told me. "It seemed so easy to make forty- 
five dollars a week." So Kay, once she had had a taste 
of big money, just had to devise some new way of eking 
out her five-dollar-weekly allowance. That's how she 
came to radio as a singer. 

Blues singers were just coming in, and with her usual 
aplomb, Kay felt she could sing better than they could. 
Although Nature had endowed her with a high, squeaky 
voice, the butt of her family's jokes, she was not daunted 
by that. 

"Mother, who gave vocal lessons, had often said you 
could change the range of your tones," she told me. "I 
decided to get rid of my squeak and develop a lower range 
for blues singing." So for months she practiced by 
herself : grunting, growling, barking, using the piano notes 
as accompanist and guide. After three months she had 
four low notes, full and throaty, at her command. Finally, 
there was an entire octave. Now she felt it was time to 
get on the air and make big money. 

She didn't apply for an audition the regular way, ap- 
proaching humbly, the wav anv girl who wanted to get 
started in a new field would (Continued on page 78) 

35 



RADIO STARS 



the original IP girl 




IF! 

Upon that insignifi- 
cant word hinged the 
whole future of Pat- 
ti Chapin. // she 
hadn't tearfully broken her en- 
gagement with the Boy Friend, 
she wouldn't have gone on that 
West Indies trip' to forget. // she 
hadn't missed the boat going home 
she wouldn't have made the next 
boat. // she hadn't made the next 
boat she wouldn't have got that 
New York job. // she hadn't got 
the New York job she wouldn't 
have made the important New 
York connections. If she hadn't 
made the connections — well, she'd 
have been where she started, a lit- 
tle Atlantic City typewriter pound- 
er who sang in amateur church 
shows, instead of cooing blue notes 
into a CBS microphone. 

Lest this sound like so much 
Einstein, let's start with the Boy 
Friend, because, after all, he was 
the first link in the fateful chain. 
It was one of those childhood 



sweetheart arrangements, which 
began with his carrying her books 
from school, and then progressed 
to the fraternity-pin and finally 
the engagement ring stage. Then 
one day they took stock of each 
other and discovered that in the 
long period between the "school 
books" and the "engagement ring" 
periods they had both wandered 
on entirely different paths. So 
they shook hands and called it a 
day. 

Well, a girl doesn't break off 
with a boy friend of upteen years 
standing without getting some sort 
of an empty feeling around the 
heart. Patti's family got tired of 
seeing her moping around the 
house, so they shipped her off on 
one of those West Indies cruises 
"to forget." How were they to 
know that the trip was to be link 
No. 2; forging their Patti to an 
entirely new life? 

Patti was so busy in the West 
Indies "foregtting" that she en- 
tirely forgot the boat's sailing 




Parti Chapin made her debut on 
Jack Pearl's Peter Pfeiffer program. 

schedule and reached the harbor 
just in time to see the smoke- 
stacks fading into the dis- 
tance. 

She (Continued on page 70) 




, it started 

introduced 

our Willie „-..«• ■-- . , , 

to the air. Willie Moms changed 



IT was a laugh — a hearty, innocent laugh — 
which switched Willie Morris from one career 
to another. Yes, the same Willie Morris who 
trills those lyrical high notes opposite John 
Charles Thomas on his Wednesday evening 
show,"JohnCharlesThomasandHisNeighbors." 
It occurred — the laugh, I mean — in the Paris salon of 
Mme. Hilda Roosevelt, a music critic. Mme. Roosevelt 
said something amusing and Willie just threw back her 
head and laughed. That's all there was to it. But Mme. 
Roosevelt sat bolt upright. "My dear, if your voice has 
the tonal quality of your laugh, you're a born singer I" 
At that Willie laughed again. This was too — too funny ! 
Here she was, studying the piano in Europe after hav- 
ing devoted her whole young life to becoming a concert 
pianist, and now she was told she was a singer — because 
of her laugh! 

But Mme. Roosevelt insisted and Willie", being from 
Missouri (Mexico City, if you insist), decided to be 
shown. She crossed a couple of borderlines and ended 
up in Rome and Mme. Bianco's voice studio. Mme. Hi* 




RADIO STARS 



they eailled him "pipes 




TALK 
success 
ten to 
Allen. 



about your 
stories — lis- 
this ! Stuart 
vocalist with 



Richard Himher's or- 
chestra, was born in 
Harlem, which — any New Yorker 
will tell you — is a little neighbor- 
hood bounded on all sides by fire- 
escapes and poverty. A few days 
ago the social columns carried the 
item that Mr. Allen was the week- 
end guest at the Long Island es- 
tate of — ahem — Mr. George Van- 
derbilt . . . Boy, page Horatio 
Alger ! 

How did he do it? "With my 
voice," sez he, blushing to the 
roots of his wavy brown hair. 
(Yes, Stu is of the blushing vari- 
ety.) 

That voice was to do a lot of 
things to him. It got his family 
in the clutches of the law. It had 
him travelling half way around 
the world from the time he was 
eight, giving him the amateur 
championship of having slept in 



more Pullmans than all the trav- 
elling salesmen put together. 

About the "clutches of the law," 
though. It happened when Stuart 
was just so high and piping his 
uncertain tenor in orchestra pits 
of the theatre houses. Everybody 
was happy. The audience went 
for kid entertainers in those days. 
Little "Pipes" (he couldn't es- 
cape the nickname) could buy all 
the lollipops he wanted. And to 
the Allen family it meant that they 
didn't have to hide when the land- 
lord knocked. But one day three 
men from the Gerry Children's 
Society called and took "Pipes" 
home and told mama and papa that 
it wasn't nice to let children per- 
form in New York theatres. Or 
legal, either, they added signifi- 
cantly. 

Mama and papa took the hint, 
but there was still the landlord to 
think of, so they trundled "Pipes" 
off with a travelling show whose, 
manager thought it was perfectly 
okay and nice and legal if children 




Stuart Allen got his radio job in 
an entirely accidental manner. 

sang their little heads off on the 
stage. 

This continued until the pip- 
ing deepened into a baritone, 
"Pipes" (Continued on page 70) 



with a hinijh 



BY HELEN HOVER 



horses in mid-stream and triumphantly rode to success ! 



anco said, "Yes, yes — by all means sing, and leave the 
piano alone !" 

But back home there were Complications. It seems 
that Colonel Morris, a methodical gentleman if ever there 
was one, had set aside a certain trust fund for the ed- 
ucation of each of his three children. So much for Wil- 
lie, so much for Fred, and so much for Mize. Well, Wil- 
lie's so much had been spent — down to the very last penny 
— on her piano. She couldn't squeeze another cent for 
vocal lessons, because there just wasn't another cent to 
squeeze. What to do now? 

Suddenly young brother Fred stepped in like a Dick 
Tracy hero to save the day for our Willie. "I'll give up 
a term of college and give you that money of my fund. 
But it's for just one term — remember." 

Into that time Willie crammed all the voice training 
she could possibly get, studying with the best teachers in 
Boston. At the end of the six months Willie trooped into 
Station WEEI in Boston, took an audition and ended up 
as hostess-soloist there. Willie continued her voice les- 
sons and Fred entered his second vear at Notre Dame. 



In between times she managed to tuck the New England 
prize of the 1931 Atwater Kent music contest under her 
belt, so she decided that she was on the right track. 

This past winter she was called to New York to 
sing with John Charles Thomas in his new show. Im- 
agine — an unknown to sing with the John Charles 
Thomas. It was a gruelling test for a recognized singer 
— much less a nervous little newcomer from the mid- 
west. But she's still there, standing next to the great 
Thomas, singing note for note with him, acting as calmly 
as though she'd been singing before a mike all her life. 

Willie looks more like an athlete than a gifted so- 
prano. She has a wholesome, beaming face like the 
girl on the Cream of Wheat ads, blondeish, flyaway hair 
and the broad shoulders and slim hips of a back-stroke 
swimmer. 

Practically every letter that Willie receives asks : 
"Whereever did yon get that funny first name?" 

1 told you before that Willie's father was methodical 
and planned every little detail in advance. Well, he 
and Mrs. Morris were so sure (Continued on page 69) 

37 



When chorines dance, the mike 
goes on the floor to catch the 
sound of their lyric feet. Here 
are the girls who broadcast the 
closing tap-dance 
and His Girls". 



opening and 
of "N.T.G. 



J. Walter Thompson 

Bernie Ross, deft 
impersonator of 
many famous folk, 
tries his art on 
Schnozzle Durante. 





Taken by our own J. B. 
Scott, this exclusive 
shot, Joe and Mrs. Penner. 



Raymond Page (left) ace 
CBS maestro, meets Lily 
Pons and Kostelanetz. 



J. B. Scott 







Helen Stevens Fisher, of 
National Farm and Home 
hour, with A. A. Stagg. 

Foto-Ncw* 




Can you guess who he 
is? You're right! Our 
Eddie, with Mrs. Cantor. 

J. B. Scott 




■I Wjg*^ " 



Wide World 




Have you heard Prima's band? 
Its popularity is spreading 
rapidly from Coast to Coast. 
Here is Louis Prima with his 
Famous Door Five, whose ultra- 
hot dance rhythms are fast 
becoming the rage. Tune in 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 



"I don't know 
whether I'm him 
or he's me!" says 
Jimmie Durante, 
looking at Bernie 



'arks Johnson draws many 
smile with his "Voice of 
■he People" broadcasts. 

r Thompson 



Even an injured foot did 
not keep Anne Seymour 
from her weekly broadcast. 




Foto-News 






i cover 
the studios 

BY GADABOUT 

Exclusive new gossip by 
Gadabout, the columnist 
the radio stars follow 



Above, Joan Blaine, of Princess Pat 
Players, receives the Princess Pat 
Beauty Contest Cup from Sally O'Brien. 
Another cup, for First Prize in the 
World's Fair Personality Contest, is 
won by nineteen-year-old Gene Abbay, 
right. Schumann-Heinle presents it. 
Making hot music cool, Buddy Rogers 
rehearses his musicians in a pool. 





Wide World Photos 



MEMORIAL 

Radio has a heart ! Deep down 
under its adamant schedules and 
its iron-.bound rules, it has feeling. 
But Will Rogers and Wiley Post 
had to die before it was revealed. 

Perhaps you listened to the hour- 
long memorial program NBC pre- 
pared, when word was flashed to 
the world of the tragedy. If so, you 
heard strong men — Roscoe Turner, 
Fred Stone, George M. Cohan — cry 
as they told of their friendship for 
the dead men. You heard Bing 
Crosby lower his voice a full octave 
when it broke in the middle of his 
song, "Home On The Range." So 
that these men might speak their 
hearts, NBC waived its most rigid 
rule : it was not necessary for them 
to read from approved scripts. 
'NBC knew that only fine, good 
things could be said of them. 
40 



REUNION 

We're in studio 8G, where most 
of NBC's big things happen. Some- 
thing is happening, too. Bing 
Crosby is on the stage, wearing his 
usual white cap and polo shirt. He's 
decidedly chubby. He's grinning 
and shaking hands enthusiastically 
with everyone in Paul Whiteman's 
orchestra. For the first time in five 
years, he's playing a date with the 
band that started him out. He's do- 
ing it for nothing, for old time's 
sake, and the fact is worth about 
five thousand dollars to Whiteman, 
since that is approximately Bing's 
price for a guest appearance. Paul 
probably didn't pay Crosby much 
more than that all the time he sang 
with his orchestra. 

As we watch, one of the violin- 
ists asks with mock seriousness for 
an autograph on a music stand. 



Crosby bops him smartly on the 
head with a rubber, mallet he takes 
away from the drummer and they 
both laugh like a couple of kids. 
After a bit, the greetings are over 
and — while Crosby and the Dorsey 
brothers gab — the orchestra re- 1 
hearses. Crosby rehearses, too — 
— and everyone who is visiting the 
studio is disgruntled, for he does I 
not sing while rehearsing. He 
mouths a line or two, then whistles 
the rest, listening critically to the 
orchestra the while. It is this trait 
of Crosby's that drives production j 
men frantic, since it is their desire 
to make rehearsals as near perfect 
as possible. 

. . . AND DISUNION 

You're hearing, if you like gooc 
dance music, Jacques Fray's orches- 
tra over the (Continued on page 87) 



!jossi|» sit si <j I since 



Birthday 


Height 


Weight 


Color Hair 


Married 
or Single 


Nov. 26 


5* 9" 


He hasn't 
any 


Brown 


Married 




Fred Astaire 

I saw Fred recently in one of our most staid 
publishing houses. But even the traditions of the 
place didn't keep everyone in the building from 
coming in to look at the new radio star who is 
plotting a book for them. 




Birthday Height Weight Color Holr ""singfe 



Apr. 16 



5" 6' 



135 



Brown 



Bride- 
to-be 



Betty Barthell 

Betty sang a real swan song to radio recently. 
She's travelling 'way over to China to marry an 
aviator stationed there by Pan-American Airways 
— the name's Vaughn— and she'll only be back 
for visits, if then. 




Oct. 25 



5' 9' 



152 



Grayish 
Blonde 



Married 



Wallace Butterworth 

His agency cancelled a program on the day of 
its broadcast. NBC aired it anyway. Wally 
shouted a denial at the end of the program, and 
was NBC sore! 




Jan. 15 6' 0' 



175 



Brown Married 



Goodman Ace 

He says he sent a fifty-dollar white suit to the 
cleaners and it shrank so it came back as a pair 
of knickers and an Eton jacket. He says he's 
sore, too. 



June 30 



6' 0" 



175 



Dark 
Brown 



Married 



Don Bestor 

I understand that bespatted bandleader Don 
has started making phonograph records to be 
played from roadside signboards. They'll be 
automatically played over and over and loud- 
speakered so we'll hear 'em clear to here. 




Nov. 20 



5' 3' 



118 



Brownish 
Black 



Single 



Virginia Verrill 

According to rumor, her mother, Aimie McLean, 
may join her in a bit of duo singing — the first 
such team on the air. 




Aug. 17 5' 6' 



125 



Blonde Divorced 



Gogo DeLys 

During one of the breathless Manhattan heat 
waves, she lost her voice, poor thing. So a pilot 
took her miles above the humidity and back it 
came. Bing! Like this item I 



Oct. 18 5" T 



102 



Blonde Single 




Annette Hanshaw 

Annette comes back to a grand new show of 
her own after her first vacation since Show Boat 
went on the air — about three years ago. She 
went to the Maine woods and she looks swell, 
thank you. 



Apr. 29 6" 1 



197 



Black 



Sepa- 
rated 




Duke Ellington 

Leo Reisman considers this pianist and ar- 
ranger and leader one of the few modern 
geniuses. Ellington buys the most expensive silk 
shirts made and rarely stays in one place more 
than a month. 




May 5 5' 6' 



200 



Brown Single 



Kate Smith 

She got nicked for fifteen dollars by a millionaire 
t'other day. Abraham Starr, the East side black- 
smith who may inherit millions in diamond dough, 
was asked if he would broadcast. He said he 
would — for $25. Kate chiselled him down. 



Feb. 20 5' 2V2* 



110 



Blonde Single 



Vera Van 

You'll not hear her for a time on Columbia's 
sustaining programs. She wanted too much 
dough and now she is looking for something else 
— which she probably will get. 



Nov. 13 5' IT 



165 



Brown 



Twice 



Conrad Thibault 

The agency handling Show Boat is plotting star- 
dom for Conrad. The angle is that they will 
call a new show "Conrad Thibault's Log Cabin," 
if he signs an exclusive contract which will take 
him off of Winninger's Tent Show. 



Oct. 24 



5" IT 



260 



Gray 



Won't 
talk 



B. A. Rolfe 

This rotu/id gentleman, busy making his third 
miHion — he made two in the movies — will hire a 
promising arranger any day in the week. So, if 
you arrange promisingly. . . . 



Aug. 23 5' 9' 



155 Sandy Married 



Ray Perkins 

This funny comic could have crashed the dough 
Major Bowes' amateur winners are making on 
tour, but since he conducts a rival simon-pure 
program, he decided it would be unethical. 



Mar. 18 5' 7" 



165 



Blonde Married 



George Olsen 

Maybe it's because George has six new men in 
his band, none more than twenty-one, that he is 
replacing his familiar train theme. Anyway, the 
new melody (to be inaugurated, possibly, on a 
new commercial) is by an amateur writer. 



May 6 



6' 



199 



Black Single 



Parkyakarkas 

Harry Einstein is one of the few who have 
achieved stardom in a role overshadowed by 
another. Last season as many as six gag writers 
collaborated on his four-minute spot — and will 
again when he and Cantor return to the air. 



August 



5' 9" 



156 



Slightly 
Brown 



Married 



Phil Baker 

Don't worry about Phil. Although the hams he 
has been plugging have decided against further 
radio ads, Beetle, Bottle and Baker are set for 
an even better show to be aired as soon as you 
read this. 



Feb. 19 5'3Vj' 



110 Chestnut Single 



Connie Gates 

Connie is greeted by studio friends with this: 
"Wie Gehts!" It's Peter Van Steeden's idea. 
Incidentally, Peter and David Broeckman are the 
only leaders to hail from Holland. 



41 





BY MARY JACOBS 



Mid-Victorian angel, or modern 
Miss- which is Jessica Dragonette? 



Hal Phyfe 




IT took almost a whole day for Jessica Dra- 
gonette to get her hair cut. Moreover, she 
had to go to three different places . . . but, 
what ? What ! You didn't know she'd had her 
hair cut ? 

Well, it's the big news of the moment. And 
a big scene in the Paramount picture, "Big Broadcast of 
1936." There, for the first time, the folk who worship 
at the shrine of the air's First Lady will have a chance to 
see their goddess in the movies. 

The funny — and sorta sad — thing is that they won't 
be seeing the person they've adored. They'll be seeing 
a girl whose looks have done a chameleon change these 
last few weeks. Here is a brand-new Jessica just out 
of the cellophane wrapper, all dressed up and ready to go 
places in the motion picture business. The hair-cut did 
it. Personally, I like her heaps, but somehow I can't 
repress the teeny-weeny wonder if all this about-face is 
going to do anything to the heaven-high career of hers. 
If being a movie actress — and subject to the mad things 
the movie moguls cause nice girls to do — might not wreck 
the affection in which she is held by a lot of folk. 

You see, Jessica never was a flesh-and-blood radio star. 
That nightingale voice came out of the heavens and lis- 
tening Hans Olsen up in Minnesota let his brain vapor- 
ings turn her into a blonde and buxom Brunhilde. At 
the same moment, Enrico Spiglione sat listening to a dark, 
flashing-eyed Carmen and plain Joe Doakes heard a 
girl with a Follies face and a Marlene Dietrich figure. 
But now, parading through two superb songs in the "Big 
Broadcast," Jessica becomes a lady indubitably lovely to 
look at but none of the things those worthy gentlemen 
had imagined. 

So the movies, whether we like it or not, indeed, 
whether she likes it or not, are bound to do something to 
her. 

You may wonder why this all came about. Why has 
she decided to run the gamut of critical eyes in ten thou- 
sand American theatres. I think I know the answer. 

You see, really, there are two Jessica Dragonettes. First, 
there is the angelic sweetness-and-light figure. The girl 
without a human vice, an ordinary emotion. A spiritual 
being, above all worldly things, sheltered, living in 
shadows. That's the picture Publicity has created : the 
image that millions of fans, hearing only the clear, "sweet, 
flute-like voice, have implanted in their hearts. During 
the first years of her radio career this side of Jessica 
predominated. 

And then there is the other Jessica, the modern miss. 
A bit of a flirt. A bit of a hoyden. With a will of iron. 
With a temper. Courage to spare. Her share of human 
virtues and failings. A modern up-to-date Jessica, who 



wears a rubber bathing suit and kids about its ripping; 
who takes a drink every now and then ; who loves to stay 
up late dancing with the boys. A bit of the devil in her. 

Constantly, since Jessica first came to the air in 1926, 
these two Jessica Dragonettes have been warring with 
each other. The old-fashioned girl with the modern. The 
mid-Victorian angel with the flesh-and-blood twentieth 
century girl. 

Publicity has shoved the old-fashioned girl into the 
limelight. The millions who worship Jessica as an 
ethereal being never had the chance to get a glimpse of 
the other Jessica. How could she show her real self to 
you ? Once the image of her as a spiritual being had been 
created, she was afraid to come out into the open ; afraid 
you might not like her as she really is. Besides, she did 
not approve of airing her private life. 

Well, all that is over. Jessica has surrendered — de- 
cided to let you and me know exactly what she is like. 
She's as fed up with the pictures of herself as an un- 
cloistered nun as I am. It's her cutting her hair that did 
it, more than any other single factor I know. It has 
introduced into her life a new phase, what might almost be 
called the Hollywood period. 

In the past there have been flashes of the modern girl, 
of the hoyden, even. If the stories of what Jessica has 
done had been told of anyone else, they would have 
caused quite a rumpus. When they happened to little 
Miss Dragonette, no one paid any attention to them. For 
Jessica, like Helen Hayes, has the faculty of making what- 
ever she does seem immensely proper. 

You can't conceive of your spiritual, gossamer girl 
pulling such a prank on a producer that he still nurses a 
grudge, after nine years, can you? 

Yet it happened — when Jessica, new to New York, was 
walking her feet off looking for a chance at a stage play. 
For two hours she had sat waiting patiently in the stuffy 
theatre. There were at least a hundred other girls, tired 
and restless, waiting for tryouts. They had been called 
to be tested for a singing role in a new Morris Green 
musical show. 

Finally the stage manager appeared, as arrogant and 
high-hat as they come. Patronizingly he told the girls 
about the play. As soon as Jessica heard it was to be a 
road show, her interest vanished. She couldn't leave New 
York. 

She rose quietly, and began walking out. 

"Hey, you!" he yelled, "where are you going?" 

"On the spur of the moment," she told me, "I decided 
to have some fun with the pompous stage director. It 
would, at least, repay me for my two hours' wait." 

Now Jessica speaks French beautifully. In her most 
flirtatious French manner she ( Continued on page 72) 

43 





Leading off our patchwork of ra- 
dio personalities is "Andy" An- 
drews (above). Listed in the fam- 
ily Bible in his home town, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, as Orvill Andrews, Jr., 
Andy early devoted himself to 
music. His voice and his banjo 
helped to put him through the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. In 1932 he 
joined Al Pearce's gang and still 
is its singing comedian. He is 
married and has a young son. 




As easy to look at as to listen to 
is Kaye Kernan (above). Miss 
Kernan is a Cincinnati society girl, 
who studied voice at the Cincin- 
nati Conservatory of Music. She 
appeared in amateur theatricals 
and also she modeled profession- 
ally for a short time, prior to her 
radio debut in January, 1934. 
Kaye is the vocalist with Johnny 
Hamp's orchestra at the Ambas- 
sador Hotel, in Atlantic City. 




inaT pieasanT smgsng voice you 
hear with the Cities Service Or- 
chestra belongs to Ross Graham 
(below). This young Southern bari- 
tone is an Ark ansas Atwater Kent 
audition winner. He has sung 
special programs of justly-popular 
new and old ballads, sued as 
"Bless This House", "Come to the 
Fair", and "Beautiful Dreams", and 
other lovely songs well suited to 
his sympathetic Southern voice. 





So much has been written about 
Vivienne Segal (below) — Vivienne 
of the Broadway musical comedy 
stage — Vivienne of the movies — 
Vivienne of the airlanes. . . . You 
know her as well as we do nowl 
Vivienne is the featured soloist of 
Waltz Time — that delightful pro- 
gram that makes Friday evenings 
at nine a truly memorable occa- 
sion. We couldn't omit her from 
our pages of radio personalities. 



This young and smiling lady on our 
left is Helen Oelheim. You've 
heard her amiable, sweet con- 
tralto on the "Showboat" program. 
Helen began her singing at the 
advanced age of ten— as a 
church soloistl Ever since 1928 
she's been in radio almost con- 
stantly. The Metropolitan Opera 
has engaged her for the coming 
season. Helen is married and 
lives in Merrick, Long Island. 



Another one of the popular radio 
highlights is one who is heard reg- 
ularly on many outstanding pro- 
grams. Rosaline Greene [above) 
has played more feminine leading 
roles on the air than most people 
in radio can remember. When she 
steps into a role, she identifies 
herself sympathetically with it. No 
wonder her work is in demand 
with sponsors and producers. 
Beauty and brains do mix, yes sirl 





Looking at Loretta Lee (above] 
you are aware of gay, vivid color 
notes— green eyes, and auburr 
hair, and warm, red lips. . . . Lis- 
tening to her sing, you are awar 
of sweet notes, ana hot notes — 
notes that stir a responsive feelinc 
in your heart. George Hall "dis 
covered" Loretta in a music pub 
lisher's office. She made her star 
in kiddy reviews. Remember "Then 
ain't no maybe in my baby's eyes" 




Another in our crosswork pattern 
of radio favorites it Zora Layman 
(below). Zora if the tuneful solo- 
ist on the "Home on the Range" 
program, and she likewise has a 
range of her very own well worth 
I boasting aboutl Yes — it's a vocal 
range, and it actually covers three 
octaves — from low C to high C! 
You've heard this lovely and tal- 
ented songstress with John Charles 
Thomas on Wednesday evenings. 




And another popular singing trio 
is composed of "The Rorettes" 
and "Muzzy" (below). "The Ro- 
rettes", who look like twins but 
aren't, are May and Dee Gohlke. 
And "Muzzy" is Muzzy Marcellino. 
Their fetching close harmony is 
heard with Ted Rorito's band. 
'The Rorettes" joined the band 
only last season, but "Muzzy" long 
has been a favorite with countless 
Rorita fans along the airlanes. 




Meet Lucy Monroe (below). f\ 
prima donna of opera and musi- 
cal comedy, Lucy now stars eoch 
week in two of the Columbia net- 
work's most popular programs. 
On Sundays she is heard on Abe 
Lyman's "Metodiana" broadcast, 
and on Tuesdays she plays the 
role of Rank Munn's leading lady 
in "Lavender and Old Lace". Lucy 
began her singing career in the 
first "Little Show" in New York. 



"Uncle" Jim Harkins (above), 
pinch-hitter for Red Allen in Town 
Hall Tonight while the comedian 
is out in Hollywood, once was a 
vaudeville heodliner, with his wife. 
The team was billed as "Marion 
and Jim Harkins". Later he ap- 
peared in many movie "shorts '. 
Friendship with Fred Alien brought 
him into radio work in 1931. Uncle 
Jim now acts as Amateur Cast- 
ing Director for Town Hall. 




There's romance blooming in the 
Shell Chateau — when Peggy Gar- 
diner and Jack Stanton (below), 
popular young singing team, con- 
tribute their charming duets, 
along with the glittering galaxy 
of guest stars presented each 
week by Al Jolson during the Shell 
Chateau broadcasts. And is this 
sweet romance a real one? Or 
merely a radio romance. But you'll 
have to guess the answer to that I 






After NBC engineers "wake 
the networks, the Don Hall 
(above) goes on the air every 
week-day morning promptly at 
seven-thirty, as the eye-opener 
for the radio audience. The trio's 
offering is a program of songs and 
patter, an offering that brought 
them from an Ohio schoolroom to 
New York. The trio are Grace 
Donaldson (left), George "Don" 
Hall, Hortense Rose (Mrs. Hall). 



Across the page, at our left, is tal- 
ented Anne Tee man. Anne is a 
New Yorker, but she grew up out 
in Chicago. There she played in 
stock companies, then she wos 
whisked off to Hollywood to make 
silent pictures. After that she re- 
turned to New York to play fea- 
tured roles on the Broadway stage. 

i. now Pky* an im P or *ant role 
~™at ft Norah— in Gertrude 
Berg'i "The House of Glass." 




Last, but not the least in our cross- 
section of radio, is lovely Bess 
Johnson (left). And the bewitch- 
ing young lady with her is her six- 
year-old daughter, little Miss Jane 
Orr Perry. Bess is well known to 
her listeners as the modern, so- 
phisticated bachelor-girl, "Ranees 
Moron", of 'Today's Children"— 
but in reality she is a devoted wife 
and mother and home-maker. Her 
husband is Doctor Paul Perry. 



How Pat found Pick, 
Molasses found January 
and both found fortune 



"Us is min- 
strel mens," 
say Pat and 
Pick — alias 
Padgett and 
Malone — or 
Molasses V 
January. 



c/ 



pick 21 ml pat 




"RUN 'em on, boys — Run 'em o-o-on!" 
Folks, say howdy to Molasses 'n' January, alias 
Pick and Pat, alias Padgett and Malone. First 
meet Pat, or Molasses, or Butterbeans, or Box- 
car or Sooty or any nom-de-blackface you can 
think of off-hand. He's answered to the most outland- 
ish names this side of the minstrel boards. But if he 
had a formal moment, he'd be called Mr. Pat Padgett. 

Some folks are disappointed when they see "Showboat" 
to learn that Molasses V January really are not negroes 
at all but a pair of white fellers with black stuff smeared 
all over their Irish noggins. But — "Us ain't supposed to 
be culluh'd," explains Pat in real Molasses-ese. "Us is 
minstrel mens." 

Any veteran barnstormer just has to take a look at Pat 
Padgett to see before him a real old-time minstrel man 
come to life. From that broken-down straw hat, past the 
burnt cork face and languorous drawl, down to the daw- 
dling dog-trot. Pat's as much a part of a minstrel show as 
a page out of a 1907 Billboard. 

Get his background. Birthplace : Atlanta, Geawgiah. 
First stepping stone : amateur nights at the "Orpy" 
House. Experience : end man in a Birmingham minstrel 
show. Shades of a cross-eyed pickanniny, if that don't 
give him all the ingrejiments of a lowdown minstrel mans ! 
(Help, they've got us talking that way, too!) 

After touring around with the then-famous 'Lasses 
White's Show, Pat annexed himself a partner and they 
both did a blackface double in vaudeville. They toured 
the South and Midwest until one fine day the partner got 
homesick and left Pat and a little note stuck underneath 
a cold cream jar, and a "dare-you-make-me-laugh" audi- 
ence howling for them out front. 

Equal to the emergency, Pat (Continued on page 83) 



"WE'RE too much alike to go together out- 
[j.ik JUd^ s '^ e of work." 

Pick Malone — otherwise January of Molas- 
ses 'n' January, otherwise Pick of Pick and 
Pat — talking about his partner and himself. 
"We're two hot-headed Irishmen," Pat said, "and if we 
saw too much of each other — well, the team of Molasses 
and January wouldn't have been together this long." 
(Going on its fourth birthday, incidentally.) 

No wonder. They're two scrappy Irishmen who will 
square fists at the drop of a brown derby. And just as 
quickly forget what they're fighting about. Like the 
time they were playing vaudeville and were supposed to 
take a curtain call. Pick found himself on the stage — 
no Pat in sight — taking the bow alone. He stalked off 
the stage and found Pat in the dressing-room content- 
edly listening to the World Series over the radio. Pick 
called Pat a so-and-so. Pat called Pick a this-and-that. 
Pick swung at Pat. Pat swung at Pick. And pretty 
soon there were four white-gloved minstrel fists pummel- 
ing away until a group of stagehands heaved the fists and 
their owners clear out into the backstage alleyway. They 
lifted themselves up. Pat dusted Picks suit. Lick dusted 
Pat's trousers, and they walked in. friends again. 

TNT and nitro-glycerine, Mrs. Pick calls them. Mrs. 
Pick should know her famous husband better than any- 
one else because besides being his marital partner for 
about twenty years, she was his vaudeville partner for 
about sixteen. She met him when she was a chorus-girl i 
and he was hoofer and end man in a Midwest travelling! 
show. They both came from Oklahoma, they both liked | 
show business and hot tamales, so they married and forth- 
with became the professional team of Malone and Mack, a; 
hlack-and-tan minstrel twosome. (Continued on page A',"?) 




e, they call it 
White Rabbit 

e. Milton Cross 
conductor, and 

imie McCollion 
;the driver. 



Here we are, Juniors ! New Pictures, new programs, news ! 



PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN 



7:30 EST («..;> — Jolly Bill and Jane. 

NBC Service to WEAF only. 
(Monday to Saturday Inclusive.) 
8:00 EST <Vi> — Spareribs — children's stories 
with Malcolm Claire. 

NBC Service Chicago to WEAF and net- 
work. 

(Monday to Saturday inclusive.) 
8:15 EST (%) — Pals— children's dramatic 
sketch. 

NBC Service to WJZ and network. 
(Monday to Saturday inclusive.) 
8:00 EST (1) — Sunday Morning- at Aunt 
Susan's. 

(Sundays only.) 

WABC WADC WOKO WGR CKLW 
WFBM WCAU WEAN WFBL WMBR 
WQAM WDBO WGST WPG WLBZ KLRA 
WFEA WREC WLAC WDSU WDBJ 
WMAS W1BX WWVA WSPD WORC 
WDNC WHP WDOD WNAC WKRC WHK 
WJAS WBIG WBRC WICC WBNS CKAC 
WREC WTOC WSJS WSFA. 

9:00 EST (1) — Coast to Coast on a Bos of 
the White Rabbit Line. Milton J. Cross 
conducting. 
(Sundays only.) 
WJZ and associated stations. 

8:30 EST (Y*)— Junior Radio Journal— Bill 
Slater. 

(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 
10:30 EST (%)— Let's Pretend— Children's 
Program. 

(Saturday only.) 

WABC WADC WAAB WKRC WHK KLZ 
WCAU WEAN WFBL WSPD WJSV WDBO 
WICC WBT KVOR WBNS WOC WOWO 
WREC WDSU WMBD KTSA WTOC 
WIBW CFRB KTUL WIBX KGKO WSJS 
WKBN WDAE WMBG WCOA WOKO 
WKBW WDRC WDNC WSBT WMAS 
WCAO WACO WFEA KLRA WDOD 
WQAM WFBM WMBR WNOX WHP 
WLAC WSFA KSL KOMA KWKH WLBZ 
WBIG KFH WDBJ WGST WORC KRLD 
KSCJ CKLW WJAS WSMK WBBM 
WWVA. 

10:45 EST <%)— Mrs. Wlggs of the Cabbage 
Patch. Dramatic Sketch. Sponsored by 

Wyeth Chemical Co., Inc Jad Salts. 

(Monday to Friday Inclusive.) 

WABC WKBW WBBM WHK WCAU 

KMOX. 

11:00 EST (1) — Horn and Hardart's Children's 
Hour. Juvenile Variety Program. 

(Sunday only.) 



WABC only. 
12:15 EST <V 4 ) — The Gumps. Radio Sketch. 
Sponsored by Corn Products Refining Co. 
— Linit, Karo, Mazola and Kre-Mel. 

(Monday. Wednesday and Friday.) 
WABC WOKO WCAO WNAC WGR 
WBBM WKRC WHK KRNT CKLW WDRC 
KMBC KFAB WHAS WCAU WJAS WEAN 
KMOX WFBL WJSV KERN KMJ KHJ 
KOIN KFBK KGB KFRC KDB KOL 
KFPY KWG KVI WGST WBRC WBNS 
KRLD KLZ WOWO KTRH KLRA WREC 
WCCO WDSU KOMA KSL KTSA KSCJ 
WMAS. 

4:00 EST (Vi)— Betty and Bob— dramatic 
sketch. 

(Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday, Friday.) 
NBC Service Chicago Studios to: 
WJZ WBZ WJR WHAM KDKA KOIL 
WBZA WOAI WMAL WSTR WENR 
KVOO WKY KPRC KOA KDYL KPO 
KFI WBAP KGW KOMO KHQ WBAL. 

4:30 EST — Our Barn — Children's Program 
with Madge Tucker. 
(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 

4:45 EST — Adventures in King Arthur Land. 
Direction of Madge Tucker. 
(Thursday only.) 
WEAF and network. 

5:15 EST {Y*) — Grandpa Burton — humorous 
sketch with Bill Baar. 
(Monday. Wednesday and Friday.) 
WEAF and network. 

5:30 EST (Y*) — The Singing Lady— nursery 
jingles, songs and stories. 
(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WJZ WBAL WBZ WBZA WHAM KDKA 
WGAR WJR WLW CRCT CFCF WFIL 
WMAL WSYR. 

5:30 EST (V»> — Jack Armstrong, Ail Amer- 
ican Boy. 

(Monday to Friday Inclusive.) 

WABC WOKO WNAC WDRC WCAU 

WJAS WEAN WMAS. 6:30 — WBBM 

WCAO WGR WHK CKLW WJSV WOWO 

WHEC WFBL. 
5:30 EST (%) — Children's dramatic program 

with Tom Mix — Ralston Purina Co. 

WEAF WEEI WTIC WJAR WTAG WCSH 

KYW WFBR WRC WGY WBEN WCAE 

WTAM WWJ WSAI WHIO. 
5:45 EST (%) — Mickey of the Circus. 

(Friday only.) 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WNAC WHK 
WDRC WCAU WJAS WSPD WJSV WDBO 
WDAE KHJ WGST WPG WLBZ WICC 



WBT WBIG WDSU WCOA WHEC WIBX 
WKRC WTOC WDNC KSL WBNS WMBR 
WHP WOC WVOR KTSA WSBT WDOD 
KOH WBRC CKAC KGKO WACO WNOX 
WHAS KOMA WFBL WDBJ KMBC KLZ 
KRLD WFAE WALA KMOX KTRH 
KERN KFPY 
5:45 EST (Y*)— Little Orphan Annie— child- 
hood playlet. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WJZ WBZ WBZA KDKA WBAL WGAR 
WRVA WIOD WJAX WHAM WJR WCKY 
WMAL WFLA CRCT CFCF. 6:45 — KWK 
KOIL WKBF KSTP WEBC KFYR WSM 
WMC WSB WKY KPRC WOAI KTBS 
WAVE WSMB WBAB. 
5:45 EST (Yt) — The Adventures of Sam and 
Dick — sketch. 

(Monday, Wednesday and Friday.) 

NBC Service to WEAF and network. 
6:00 EST (Y*)— Animal News Club — children's 

program featuring Lou Rogers, cartoonist 

and entertainer. 

(Wednesday only.) 

NBC Service to WJZ and network. 
6:00 — EST — Orgets in the Air, 

(Tuesdays only.) 

WEAF and network. 
6:00 EST (y 4 > — Buck Rogers in the 35th 

Century. 

(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day.) 

WABC WOKO WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WKRC WHK CKLW WCAU WJAS WFBL 
WJSV WBNS WHEC. 
6:15 EST OA) — The Ivory Stamp Club with 
Capt. Tim Healy — Stamp and Adventure 
Talks. 

(Monday. Wednesday, Friday.) 
WJZ WBZ WBZA. 
6:15 EST (%) — Bobby Benson and Sunny Jim. 

(Monday. Wednesday, Friday.) 

WABC WOKO WAAB WGR WDRC 

WCAU WEAN WFBL WHEC WMAS 

WLBZ. 

6:15 EST (%) — Winnie, the Pooh — children's 
program. 

(Tuesdays.) (6:00 EST — Friday.) 
WJZ and network. 
6:45 EST (Ya) — Billy and Betty — dramatic 
sketch. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
NBC Service to WEAF only. 
7:15 EST (Y*) — Popeye, the SaUor (Wheatena 
Corp.). 

WEAF and basic network. 
(Thursday and Saturday.) 



JUNIOR JOURNAL 




Two old friends! 
Daily, except on 
Sundays, you can 
hear Jolly Bill and 
Jane. Jane's real 
name is Peggy 
Zinke. She is four- 
teen years of age. 
Jolly Bill's name is 
William Stejnke. 



Billy and Bobby 
Mauch are ten. 
They sing, dance 
and act on The 
Children's Hour, 
Gibson Family, 
Tom Mix, The 
Lady Next Door 
and on other 
NBC programs. 



Here is Jimmy Mc- 
Callion, whose 
pictufp several 
have asked to 
see. He is in sev- 
eral spots in these 
pages. Jimmy has 
lots of pep, and 
is chief mainstay 
to Madge Tucker. 



You know this 
one, of coursel 
Adventures in 
King Arthur Land. 
Left to right — 
Charita Bauer, 
Jimmy McCallion, 
Ethel Blume, Lyon 
Mary Oldham, 
Patricia Peardon. 



Oool Ooo! Dan- 
ger! Buck Rogers 
and Wilma Deer- 
ing are in a tight 
corner now! But 
their rocket pistols, 
jumping belts and 
television helmets 
will save them! 
We'll bet on that! 



Hoot, mon! 'Tis 
Walter Campbell 
Tetley himself! 
He's been singing 
in Scotland this 
summer and there 
he was called 
"NBC's Harry Lau- 
der. Walter is now 
fourteen years old. 



Ethel Blume is six- 
teen and a real 
veteran of the air- 
waves. She is 
Queen Guinevere, 
in Adventures in 
King Arthur Land. 
She makes her 
own sailor suits to 
wear in the studio. 



Dick Tracy and 
Tess Trueheart, 
whose thrilling ad- 
ventures are eag- 
erly followed by 
many fans. Dick 
is really Ned 
Wever, and Tess 
Trueheart's name 
is Rose Keane. 










"tPaal (fit Li and. Hoyl: 



ITiis month we are crowded for space, and so I have 

0 room for a story. . . . On the opposite page you will 
3 some new pictures of your radio favorites, with news 
hem and their work. Next month I expect to have a 
/ nice story for you. 

* * * 

1 the children who have written me that they wish to 
bur Radio Stars Junior Club, I must express my deep 
t that they have had to wait so long 

ieir membership pins. I hope that 
an be patient a little longer, for I am 
to have a very fine pin for you — 
s soon as they are ready to be sent, 
hall have them. 



ise of lack of space we had to omit 
lub Room page from the September 
i, and so we have few new members 
month to add to our list. But we ex- 
: to hear from many more children 
soon as they have read the Septem- 
r Radio Stars Magazine. Watch for 
eir names next month, 
lere are the newest to join our club: 




Dear Peggy Lee: 

I noticed in the September issue of Radio Stars Junior that there 
were only three of our promised five pages. I thought the reason might 
he that you had not received many letters from your junior readers. 
I have been wanting to join the club but have never found time. When 
I saw two pages of our club missing, J thought J had better hurry and 
join. So, here I am. 

I am fifteen years old, and I think the Radio Stars Junior is a great 
thing for all junior readers. For a long time there have been certain boys' 
and girls' pictures that I have wanted to see in Radio Stars, and now I am 
glad I can be assured of seeing them sooner or later. 

Would you please put in the Radio Stars Junior a picture of Florence and 
Billy Halop and Walter Tetley. 

Don't you tliink it would be nice to have a questionnaire, so that the 
members could ask questions about their favorite child stars f 

I hope you like my letter, and J will be awaiting my membership pin. J hope 
there will be more members joining our duo. You will be 
hearing from me often, becaMse I want the club to con- 
tinue. I'm all for it! 

Yours truly, 
Ruth Qum, East Canton, Ohio. 

And here is one from Allan Jones: 

Dear Miss Lee: 

I read Radio Stars and enjoy it very much, especially 
the Junior section. I am writing to you because I would 
like to become a member of your club. "Six Gun Justice" 
is my favorite, with "Dick Tracy," "Little Orphan Annie" 
and "Buck Rogers" running a close race for second place. 
I would like to see pictures of the cast of "Little Orphan 
Annie" in your section. 

Hoping that I may become a member and wishing you 
lots of success, 

Yours sincerely, 
Allan Jones, Little Britain, Ontario, Canada. 



Marjorie Rosen writes: 

"My favorite children's program on the air is 
Bobby Benson. I like him because he is so human, 
not tike others that sound, so make-believe. An- 



Hazel William*, 1!04 South Washington Ave., Dunellen, New Jersey. 
Roberta Perkins, 73 Fayette St., Watertown, Massachusetts. 
Allan Jones, Xittle Britain, Ontario, Canada. 
Ruth Gam, East Canton, Ohio. 

Rosemary Gaffney, 0718 110th St., Richmond Hill, New York. 
Florence Marilyn Druck, 3819 15th Ave., Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Tom Wilt, 107 Chestnut Street, Towanda, Pennsylvania. 
Marjorie Rosen, 1S807 Lewiston Ave., St. Albans, Long Island, 
New York. 

- Robert Ballard, 10 Barstow Ave., Towanda, Pennsylvania. 
Virginia Marilyn Rohr, 237 South Richardson Ave., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 

Your letters were so interesting, I wish 
that I could print them all. But I 
have room only for one or 
two. Here is one from Ruth 
Gum (a very good letter): 



other favorite is Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. 
"Would you please have a picture of Jimmy McCallion in this 
section some month." 

Adeline Rosinskt wants a story of Og, Son of Fire, and I hope 
to have one for a future issue. . . . Gwendolyn Withers and 
Carolyn Kerr ask for a story of Bobby Benson. . . . Frances 
Fox would like to see one of Mary Small. . . . Clara Waller 
also is interested in Mary Small and in Florence and Billy 
Halop. . . . Marie Hedges asked for a picture of the White 
Rabbit Bus, and I was glad to use one for our program 
page. . . . Virginia and Vera Guratorich also are Bobby 
Benson fans, and followers of Little Orphan Annie. . . . 
Russell and Elaine Carroll ask for Buck Rogers and 
Bobby Benson. . . . Eleanor Fair wants the story 
the Singing Lady told about Cinderella. . . . 
Thomas M. Hancock likes the Singing Lady and 
Mickey of the Circus. . . . Edith Green enjoys 
the Let's Pretend program. . . . And there 
are many, many other requests and 

(Please turn to page 54 
for other letters and 
Club Room news.) 




How to serve 
grand dinners 
with that greatly 
desired effect of 
casual perfection 



By NANCY WOOD 



For his evening meal Fred Waring 
enjoys a thick slab of roast beef, 
bouillon potatoes and new succotash. 
Below, a tempting dish, this plate of 
Southern chicken and rice croquettes. 




radio stars 9 



THE important business of an appetizing meal may seem 
to have little in common with a successful broadcast, yet 
in both cases the reason for their success is much the 
same — advance thought and preparation. 

I kept thinking of this the other day as I listened, fas- 
cinated, while Fred Waring described the tremendous 
amount of thought and planning that goes into each of his 
regular weekly Ford broadcasts. Yet this delightful hour 
of entertainment achieves above all an effect of casual 
informality. The effort expended on its preparation, as 
you know, is never, for one instant, apparent during the 
broadcast. 

Just the previous Tuesday I had witnessed one of 
these broadcasts at Columbia's Radio Playhouse and 
commented on the smoothness and ease of the perform- 
ance (quite unlike the hurried last-minute-meal I had 

50 



literally thrown together before going to the thcatei 

At the door of the Playhouse I presented a pass w 
had proved almost as hard to get as an interview 
Greta Garbo! Then, as I found a seat in the alreal 
crowded theatre, a slim, collegiate-looking young ml 
came to the front of the stage and made a short spetl 
of introduction to the audience of well over a thousal 
people. On the platform back of him were three youl 
girls in simple evening dresses and an orchestra of soil 
thirtv-five men. all grinning in happy, friendly fashi(| 
Even the sound effect fellows and the men in the conj 
room were wreathed in smiles. 

The hands of the clock moved around to 9:30. I 1 
voting leader raised his hand. Silence ! Then a burst 
gay. peppy music — Fred Waring was on the air. 1 
studio audience settled back in (Continued on page i 






"I'M ALL READY TO GO ON 
AFTER I'VE SMOKED A CAMEL... IT 
ALWAYS SEEMS TO RENEW 
MY ENERGY" 




• The Langhorne estate, 
"Greenfields," is famous 
for its hospitality. "I notice 
that Camels disappear 
amazingly fast," says Mrs. 
Langhorne. "Every one 
likes them — they are mild 
and you never tire of their 
flavor." Costlier tobaccos 
do make a difference! 



• "I certainly appreciate 
the fact that Camels never 
make me either nervous 
or edgy," Mrs. Langhorne 
says. "I can smoke all the 
Camels I want." It is true 
that Camels never upset 
the nerves. The millions 
more Camel spends are jus- 
tified. Smoke one and see. 



Mrs. Langhorne grew up in New Orleans. Now 
she lives in Virginia, where she rides to hounds. 
"One thing I especially like about Camels," she 
says, "is the fact that they are not strong and 
yet, if I am tired, smoking one always picks me 
up. I feel better and more enthusiastic immedi- 
ately." Camels release your latent energy — give 
you a "lift." Millions more are spent every year 
by Camel for finer, more expensive tobaccos. 





AMONG THE MANY 
DISTINGUISHED WOMEN WHO PREFER 
CAMEL'S COSTLIER TOBACCOS: 

NICHOLAS BIDDLE, Philadelphia 
MARY BYRD, Richmond 
POWELL CABOT, Boston 
THOMAS M. CARNEGIE, JR.. Sew York 
J. GARDNER COOLIDGE, II. Boston 
ERNEST DU PONT. JR., Wilmington 
JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, Sew York 
POTTER D'ORSAY PALMER. Chicago 
BROOKFIELD VAN RENSSELAER 
New Yonk ■ 



193.i. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. W.nston-Salem, N. C 



(^^ne^t ^ a-te C_y made 



<7i 





Atoote 



All her eggs in one basket? 
Oh, no — just tennis balls! 
And here's another role in 
which Grace is a winner — 
as a tennis star! She loves 
to be out on the court of 
her Beverly Hills estate. 
Playing tennis, singing in 
Grand Opera, making Motion 
Pictures, singing on the air 
— we wonder what Grace 
does with her spare time? 
Also we wonder, granting 
that one person really can 
have so many talents, where 
does she get all the energy 
necessary to employ them 
all? Our battered beret is 
off to Grace, who soon will 
be singing once more to her 
countless admirers over the 
radio on the Vick's program. 



William A. Krnker 
Columbia Studios 



RADIO STARS 




Skin Fault! start 
Underneath! 

In the underskirt 
are the tiny 
glands, blood ves- 
sels, nerves and 
fibres that make 
the outer skin 
lovely. When they 
begin to fail, skin 
faults start 1 



Which is Yours? 

LINES FADE when wasting under 
tissues are stimulated and fill out. 

PORES REDUCE when freed of 
clogging secretions from within skin. 

BLACKHEADS GO when clogging 
secretions are removed, and under- 
skin stimulation prevents clogging. 

BLEMISHES STOP coming when 
blackheads are prevented. 

DRY SKIN SOFTENS when pene- 
trating oils restore suppleness and 
failing oil glands grow active. 

TISSUES WON'T SAG when un- 
derskin nerves and fibres are kept 
toned up and stimulated. 



Miss Maralyn Tankersley — St. Louis: "Pond's Cold Cream stimulates 
the very life of my skim. It has kept away many a line and blemish." 

Wake up that 
Sleepy Under Skin 

with "DeepSki n'Crea m 

See outer skin lose 



Lines, Blackheads, Blemishes 




Mrs. Richard C. du Pont 



Society aviator who holds many awards for her achievements in the 
air, says: "After using Pond's Cold Cream, my skin looks as if it 
never saw a speck of dirt! 1 never have a sign of a line or wrinkle." 



The first line that shows in your face 
is a danger signal! A sign that right 
under it skin glands and cells are growing 
tired — getting sleepy. 

Every blackhead you find means that 
those same little glands are overworked! 
Getting clogged! And that's true of most 
common skin faults — nearly all start 
when your underskin slows up. 

How to stir up underskin 

But you can waken that sleepy under- 
skin! Start the circulation going briskly 
again. Stimulate those little glands and 
cells to full activity! 

What your underskin needs is the 
rousing action of Pond's deep-skin Cream. 

Pond's Cold Cream is made of spe- 
cially processed fine oils which go deep into 
the pores. The first application flushes 
them clean of every particle of dirt . . . 



make-up . . . skin secretions. At once, your 
skin feels fresher, livelier — looks clearer. 

Then you pat fresh Pond's Cold Cream 
right into your newly cleansed skin. Pat 
it briskly with your finger tips. Feel the 
blood coursing through! Every little 
nerve and gland and fibre is wakened by 
this treatment. Toned up. Invigorated! 
Your skin feels alive! . . . wide-awake! 
Do this day after day — regularly — night 
and morning. 

The very first treatment makes your 
skin clearer — feel satiny. Soon little 
threatening lines begin to fade. Black- 
heads clear away. Blemishes stop coming. 
Once again your skin is firm — young. Its 
color blooms again! 

Every night, give your skin this double-benefit 
treatment . . . Pat in Pond's Cold Cream to 
flush out all dirt, make-up, skin impurities. 
Wipe off. Then — briskly — pat in more Pond's 



Cold Cream to invigorate your underskin — 
wake up tired skin glands, nerves and cells. 

Every morning, in thedaytime before youmake 
up, refresh and reawaken your skin with Pond's 
Cold Cream. Your skin will be smooth and 
satiny, ready for powder. 

Try this for just a few days — Send for the 
special 9-treatment tube offered below. You'll 
always be glad of the day you started to use 
Pond's! Pond's Cold Cream is absolutely pure. 
Germs cannot live in it. 

Send for Special 9-Treatment Tube 

Begin to clear YOUR skin faults away 

POND'S, Dept. H28 Clinton. Conn. 

I enclose \oi (to cover postage and packing) for special 
tube of Pond's Cold Cream, enough for 9 treatments, 
with generous samples of 2 other Pond's Creams and 5 
different shades of Pond's Face Powder. 

Name ! 

Street 

City : State , 



Copyright, 1936, Tond's Extract Company 



53 



RADIO STARS 



In the picture above, we look in on a rehearsal scene. Miss Nila Mack is the lady standing with her 
back to the camera. She is the director of children's programs for the Columbia Broadcasting System, 
and she is leading her juvenile cast through a rehearsal of the dramatized fairy tale program, "Let's 
Pretend". Florence Halop is standing by the hanging microphone. Estelle Levy and Pat Ryan are seated. 



(Continued from page 49) 



preferences — all of which I shall try to an- 
swer, with pictures, news and stories, Id 
future issues. An<l I hope that you will find 
in each issue of Radio Stars Junior a great 
deal of pleasure. 

A/eu/A A/oieii 

James McCallion is Billy and 
Audrey Eagen is Betty, in "Billy 
and Betty" . . . Bobby Benson takes 
banjo lessons from the Mitchell 
boys who do the instrumental 
theme on his program . . . "Sugar 
Cane," twelve-year-old singer and 
mimic, is featured in the new Sun- 
day radio series begun September 
8th, at 12: 15 over NBC-WEAF. Sugar 
comes from New Orleans and she 
was christened Annablanche Hon- 
ness . . . Did you know that Billy 
Idelson writes poems? Some of 
them have been published in news- 
papers. He likes to cook, some- 
times, too . . . You can hear Popeye 
the Sailor on the radio now — in the 
East on Tuesdays, Thursdays and 
Saturdays at 7:15 p.m. The West 
Coast program will be presented at 
4:45 p.m. P.S.T. on Mondays, Wed- 
nesdays and Fridays . . . Irene 

54 



Wicker, the Singing Lady, enjoyed 
a short vacation in London, En- 
gland, this summer. One of her 
special wishes was to see the 
"changing the guard at Bucking- 
ham Palace" . . . Here is the cast 
of the Bobby Benson program: 
Bobby Benson, Billy Halop; Tex, 
Neil O'Malley; Harka, Craig Mc- 
Donnell; Waco, John Shea; Dio- 
genes, Tex Ritter; John and Bill, 
John and Bill Mitchell . . . Billy 
Halop's salary for his radio work is 
high, but he gets only twenty-five 
cents a day for spending money. 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS: 

Honnn Eberly, Carolyn Kerr — Bobby Ben- 
son (Hilly Halop) is thirteen, I.ucv Oilman 
Is ten. 

Roberta Perkins — YeB, child stars read their 
own Ian mail and will send pictures if you 
ask for them. 

Anne Oliver — Baby Rose Marie's address 
was given in the Club Room in the October 
issue. As this book goes to press there is no 
information as to when she will return to the 
air. 

Mrs. El mm Blaokman, Bern it n Rlchey- Our 

press service gave us the information that 
Ireene Wicker had played "Jane" on the 
"Judy ami Jane" program. Checking with 
the studio, we learn that the role is played by 
Joan Kay. Sorry. Errors will creep In some- 
times, but we do make every effOrl I" be ac- 
curate. Thank you for writing us about t bis. 



Russell anil Elaine Carroll, Joan Eevldes — 

No Information as to the date of Dick Tracy's 
return to the air is available at this date. 

Age* — Several have Inquired the ages of 
some of the child stars. This always is a 
difficult question to answer with complete 
accuracy. Very often child stars, or their 
parents, or their managers, do not like to re- 
veal their actual ages. Which is natural 
enough. Everyone has a right to privacy in 
certain matters. We give you these figures 
which have come to us from the studios 
where the children broadcast: Billy Idelson 
(15), Melvin Tonne (0), Michael Janu s O'Pav 
(10). Bat Ryan (11), Seymour Young (10), 
Florence Halop (11), Sonya Bcnlamin (4). 
Mildred Schneider (12). Billy Halop and 
Lucy Gllman we have mentioned elsewhere 
In this department. 

In case you have not already joined Radio 
Stars Junior Club, here Is a coupon for you 
to send In. Remember, it costs you nothing. 
There are no dues to pay. The purpose of 
the club is to bring child radio listeners to- 
gether, to have a place where they can tell 
what programs they like, and what they 
think of the programs to which they listen, 
to bring to children pictures, news and stories 
of chilil radio performers and their programs. 



I want to join Radio Stars' 
Junior Club. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State 



RADIO STARS 



DON'T ASK MABEL. 
HER 5KIN CIVE5 ME 

^the WLUES! 




Between the ages of 13 and 25, 
important glands develop. This 
causes disturbances throughout 
the body. Harmful waste products 
get into your blood. These poisons 
irritate the skin — and pimples pop 
out on the face, chest and back. 

Fleischman n' s Y east clears those 
skin irritants out of your blood. 
And the pimples disappear! 

Eat Fleischmann's Yeast 3 times 
a day, before meals, until your 
skin has become entirely clear. 
Start today! 



by clearing skin irritants 
out of the blood 



55 



RADIO 



STARS 



KQOL 

MILDLY MENTHOLATED 
CIGARETTES- CORK-TIPPED 




COOL UNDER FIRE! 

COOLER— they've got a touch of mild 
menthol to refresh your throat. Tastier 
— because the fine tobacco flavor is kept 
at the peak. And you get a fat dividend in 
the valuable B & W coupon in each pack; 
save them for handsome premiums. (Offer 
good in U. S. A. only.) Now that the 
season of overheated rooms and sniffles 
is coming, do right by yourself and your 
throat; get on the trail of KGDLS. And 
send for illustrated premium booklet. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., Louisville, Ky. 

SAVE COUPONS for 
HANDSOME PREMIUMS 




15* /fe TWENTY 



RALEIGH CIGARETTES . . . NOW AT POPULAR 
PRICES ALSO CARRY B & W COUPONS 

56 




SUNDAYS 



(Oct. <iHi, lUlli. 20th and 27th) 
10:0(1 KST (V a > — Southernnires Quartet. 

WJZ and an NBC blue network. 

10:00 EST <y 2 ) — Dr. Charles L. Gootlell. 
WEAF and an NBC red network. 

11:30 EST <1) — Major Bowes 1 Capitol 
Family, Waldo Mayo, conductor and 
solo violinist; Roy Campbell Royalists; 
Tom McLaughlin, baritone; Nicholas 
Cosentino, operatic tenor; Helen Alex- 
ander, coloratura soprano. 
NBC Service from the Capitol Theatre 
to WEAF and network. 

12:00 EST (1) — Salt Lake City Tabernacle 
Choir and Organ. (From Utah.) 
WABC WOKO CKLW WIBX WSPD 
WQAM WDBO WDAE WPG WLBZ 
WORC WMUR WKBN WGR WHK 
WCAU WICC WHP WEAN WNAC 
CFBR WJSV WDNC WTOC WBNS 
WBIG WCAO WJAS WFBL 
WADC. 11:00 CST — WGST WDSU 
WNAX KWKH KLRA WREC WCOA 
KRLD KTRH WCCO WLAC WMBD 
KSCJ KLZ WDNC KOMA WIBW WOC 
KTSA WACO WHP WDOD KRNT 
KFAB KFH WSFA KTUL WOWO 
KGKO. KMOX, KTRH. WALA. KOH. 
WNOX WLAC. 10:00 MST— KST. 0:00 
PST — KERN KOIN KFBK KUI KGB. 

12:00 Noon EST (Vi) — Tastyeasl Oppor- 
tunity Matinee, Johnny Johnson and 
his orchestra; guest artists. 
W.1Z WBAL WMAL W HZ WBZA 
WSYR KDKA W.JR WCKY. 

12:30 P.M. EST (1) — Radio Citj Music 
Hall. Symphony orchestra; Glee Club; 
Soloists. 

W.IZ and an NBC blue network. 

2:00 EST (1) — Guest Artists, orchestra. 
(Radio Corp. of America.) 
W.IZ and basic blue network. 

2:30 KST ('/«) — Between the Bookends. 
WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WKBW 
WCAU WJAS WFBL WSPD WJSV 
WDBJ WHEC WIBX W MAS WHK 
CKLW. 1:30 CST — KRNT KS1BC 
WFBM KFAB WHAS KMOX WGST 
WBRC WBT WBNS KRLD WOWO 
WCCO WLAC KOMA WMBD. 1 1 ::{(> 
PST — KERN KM J KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KOL KFPY. 

3:00 KST (1) — Symphonic Hour. Howard 
Harlow, conductor. 

WABC WKRC WLBZ WADC 

WHP WMBG WKBW WCAO 

WPG WKBN WMUR WBNS 

CFRB WMAS WGR WHEC 

WDItc WFBL WSMK 

WICC won. I WSJS 
WJAS WSPD WDAE 



WDNC 
WEAN 
WIBX 
WOAM 

WTOC Willie WFBL WSMK WFEA 
WDBO W ICC WDBJ WSJS WOKO 
CKLW WJAS WSPD WDAE WBT 
CKAC WORC. 2 :00 CST — KFPY 
KRNT WMBD WACO WSFA WBBM 
KLRA WSBT WIBW WOC KTSA 
KSCJ WFBM WREC KWKH 



WDSU 
KGKO 
WGST 
K I'll 
12:00 
KERN 



KRLD KTRH KOMA WHAS 
WDOD WNOX KM BC KMOX 
WBRC WCCO KSCJ WLAC 
WALA. 1:00 MST— KVOR IfSL. 
I'ST — KHJ KOIN KOL KGB 
KFRC KFBK KWG. 
3:30 KST (V4> — Penthouse Serenade. 
Charles Guylord's sophisticated mu- 
sic; Don Mario, soloist; Dorothy Ham- 
ilton, beauty adviser; guest stars. 
(Maybelllne Co.) 

WEAF WTIC WTAG WEEI WHIO 
KY W WSAI Will' WHEN WTA.M 
W.IAR WCSH WFBR WGY WCAE 
WWJ. 2:30 CST — WMAQ WOW WDAF 
Wile i KSD. 
5:00 KST (</ 2 ) — M clod la no. with \be Io- 
nian's Orchestra; Bernice Claire; So- 
prano, and Oliver Smith. Tenor. (Ster- 
ling Products, Inc. — Philips Dental 
Magnesia.) 

WABC WOKO WCAO WAAB WCAU 
WJAS WEAN WSPD wadc WJSV 
WHEC CFRB WGR WFBL WKRC 
WHK KRNT CKLW WDItC WFBM. 
4:00 CST — WBI1M K M BC WHAS 
KMOX KFAB WCCO CFRB. 
5:00 KST <>/..) — Roses and Drums. (Union 
Central Life Ins. Co.) 



DRV BV 
DRV 



WJZ WMAL WBZA WHAM WGAR 
WFIL WJR WBAL WBZ WSYR KDKA 
WLW. 4:00 CST — WENR KSO KWK 
WREN KOIL WMT. 
5:00 EST (y 2 ) — America's first Rhythm 
Symphony — De Wolf Hopper, narrator, 
with 86 artists from the Kansas City 
Philharmonic Orchestra. (United Drug 
Co.) 

WEAF WRVA WJAX WIOD WFLA 
WTAM WWJ WSAI WTIC WTAG 
WRC WJAR WCSH WFRB WGY 
WBEN. 4:00 CST — WKY WEEI WCAE 
KVOO WBAP KTHS KTBS KPRC 
WOAI WMAQ WDAF WIBA WEBC 
WAVE WSM WMC WSB WAPI WJDX 
WSMB. 3:00 MST — KOA KDYL. 2:00 
PST — KPO KFI KGW KOMO KYW 
KHQ KFSD. 
5:30 EST (V&) — Julia Sanderson and Frank 
Crumit, Jack Shilkret's Orchestra. 
(General Baking Co.) 

WABC WOKO WAAB WHK WIBX 
WSPD WBNS WWVA WADC WCAO 
WGR CKLW WJSV WHEC WORC 
WDRC WCAU WEAN WFBL WICC 
4:30 CST— WFBM KMBC 
KMOX WDSU KOMA KFH 



Becker's Fireside 
(John Morrell & 



WCAU 
WBNS 
W KRC 
CST — 
WDSU 



WMAS. 
WHAS 
KTUL. 
5:30 EST (V 4 ) — Bob 
Chats About Dogs. 
Co.) 

WJZ WBZ WBZA WSYR KDKA 
WBAL. WMAL WFIL WHAM WGAR 
WJR WCKY. 4:30 CST — WENR WMT 
KSO KWK WREN KOIL. 
6:00 EST (%) — National Amateur Night. 
Ray Perkins. Master - of - Ceremonies ; 
Arnold Johnson's Orchestra: Amateur 
Talent. (Health Products Corp. Feen- 
A-Mint.) 

WABC WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WJAS WFBL WJSV WBT 
WHEC CFRB WKBW WBBM 
WHK CKLW WDRC. 5:00 
WGST KRLD WREC WCCO 
WOWO WFBM KMBC WHAS KMOX. 
3:00 PST — KERN KM.I KHJ KOIN 
KFBK KGB KFRC KDB KOL KFPY 
KWG KVI. 4:00 MST— KLZ KSL. 

6:30 EST (V 2 ) — Grand Hotel. Anne Sey- 
mour and Don Aineche. (Campana Co.) 
WJZ WCKY WBAL WMAL WBZ 
WBZA WSYR WHAM KDKA WJR. 
5:30 CST — WMT WENR KSO KWK 
•WREN KOIL KSTP WEBC. 4:30 MST 
— KOA KDYL. 3:30 PST— KPO KFI 
KGW KOMO KHQ. 

6:30 KST (V 4 ) — Sinilin' Kd McConnell. 
Songs. (Acme Paints.) 
WABC WEAN WFBL WKBW WDRC 
WAAB WKRC CKLW WCAU WJAS 
WJSV. 5:30 CST — WBBM WHAS 
KMOX WCCO. 

7:00 KST (>/i) — Jack Benny. (General 
Poods.) 

WJZ network. 
7:30 KST (%) — Alexander Woollcott — The 

Town Crier. (Cream of Wheat Corp.) 

WABC and network. 
7:30 KST (%) — The Bakers Program with 

O/.zle Nelson, Harriet Milliard and Hob 

"Helieve-it-or-Not " Ripley. (Standard 

Brands.) 

WJZ and network 
7:30 KST (%) — Fireside Recitals. Sigurd 
Nilssen. basso; Hardest] Johnson, 

tenor; Graham McNamee, commenta- 
tor. (American Radiator Co.) 

WEAF WTAG W.IAR WCSH WTIC 
WHIO KYW WFBR WRC WGY 
WBEN WWJ WCAE WTAM WSAI. 
6:30 CST— WMAQ WOW WIRE WDAF 
KSD 

7:45 KST (>/,) — Sunset Dreams — Morin 
Sisters and the Ranch Boys, (Fitch.) 
WEAF WTAG W.IAR WCSH WHIO 
WFBR WRC WGY WBEN WCAE 
WTAM WWJ WLW CFCF WTIC 6:l"> 
CST— WHO WMAQ KSD KYW WOW 
WIRE, 

8:00 KST ('^) — "Rhythm At H." Al Good- 
man's orchestra. Sponsored by I.ehn 
Ai Kink Products Co. — I.ysol Disinfec- 
tants. 

W A BC WADC WOKO WCAO WN AC 
WGR WFBL WSPD WJSV WUH.M 
WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC. 7:00 CST 
— KRMT WFBM KMBC KFAB WHAS 
WCAU WMAS WEAN KMOX. 

(Continued on page SO) 



RADIO STARS 



THE SINGING LADY 



Asks your CO-OPERATION 



I am sure that every one who 
loves children will be interested 
in this unusual offer. 

You see, as the Singing Lady 
I have been telling stories over 
the radio to children five days 
a week for the past five years. 
In that time I have written and 
told over a thousand stories. 
Now I am eager to have your co- 
operation in obtaining new ideas 
for new story material. And I 
am sure that there are many 
wonderful stories that you tell 
your children, or have read, or 
know about that will bring joy 
and pleasure to little folks who 
listen to the Singing Lady. Won't 
you send those ideas to me ? 

My sponsor, the Kellogg Com- 
pany, has very generously offered 
$9000 in cash prizes for the best 

letters that are sent in to me. the singing lady 
NO TOPS TO SEND— NO LABELS— NO BOTHER! 



Doesn't that make you want to 
get busy at once? And don't 
forget that your letter may not 
only win a large cash prize — 
but it will help make millions of 
children happier ! 

Please write me a letter telling 
the kind of stories you think chil- 
dren like best. Or give a brief 
suggestion for new story ideas — 
the kind your children — or chil- 
dren you know — enjoy most. It 
isn't necessary to write a com- 
plete story — just send in ideas — 
plots of stories — or even a letter 
containing suggestions for Sing- 
ing Lady programs. 

Your interest and help will be 
very sincerely appreciated. 




$ 



10,000 



IN CASH 
PRIZES 



The Kellogg Company is very happy to 
co-operate with the Singing Lady in her 
quest for new ideas by offering $10,000 in 
cash prizes. 

Few radio programs have ever appealed 
to a larger and more loyal audience. The 
Singing Lady has been voted the best chil- 
dren's radio entertainment for the past two 
years in a poll of radio editors conducted 
by the New York World-Telegram. This 
year the Singing Lady received the Radio 
Stars' Aivard for distinguished service to 
radio. In addition, more than two million 
fan letters have been received. 

The Kellogg Company believes with the 
Singing Lady that the mothers and those 
who love children can help materially in 
making these programs even more inter- 
esting and enjoyable to little folks. 

Three kinds of letters can win prizes: 

1. A letter with ideas for new stories. 

2. A letter telling what kind of stories 
children like best. 

3. A letter giving constructive sugges- 
tions and ideas for the Singing Lady's 
program. 

Make your letter any of these three types. 
The cash prizes will be paid for the letters 



that are the most helpful to the Singing 
Lady. As there are 1033 cash prizes, there 
is a fine chance for you to win one of them. 

You can hear the Singing Lady over the 
N. B. C. Basic Blue Network — also in 
Toronto and Montreal. See your news- 
paper for time and station. Also, you will 
find some of the Singing Lady stories in 
condensed version printed on the backs of 
Rice Krispies packages. These are very 
helpful in writing your letter. 

Let your children enjoy the stories on the 
packages. They are an extra value when 
you buy Kellogg's Rice Krispies — the deli- 
cious cereal that snaps, crackles and pops 
in milk or cream. Your grocer sells Rice 
Krispies. Made by Kellogg in Battle Creek. 



3. Prizes will be awarded for the letters that are 
the most helpful to the Singing Lady. Any one of 
three types can win: (1) a letter with ideas for new 
stories; (2) a letter telling what kind of stories 
children like best; (3) a letter giving constructive 
suggestions and ideas for the Singing Lady's 
programs. 

4. All suggestions submitted become the property 
of the Kellogg Company. 

5. Contest closes October 26, 1935. Letters post- 
marked later than this date not accepted. 

6. Send your letter to the Singing Lady, Kellogg 
Company, Box 9, Battle Creek, Michigan. 



HERE ARE THE PRIZES 

$1000 for the best letter $1000 



600 for second best letter . . . 
400 for third best letter . . . 
100 for next ten best letters . . 
50 for next twenty best letters 
5 for next 1000 best letters . 
Total 



600 
400 
1000 
1000 
5000 
$9000 



HERE ARE THE RULES 

1. Any one can submit a letter excepting em- 
ployees and members of employees' families of the 
Kellogg Company and their advertising agents. 

2. Put the name of your grocer or the store man- 
ager on your letter. If you win one of the big 
prizes he will win one too. 



$1000 /A 7 PRIZES FOR 
GROCERS 

In recognition of the co-operation of grocers in 
displaying Rice Krispies and explaining this offer, 
we will give the following prizes to the grocers 
whose customers win prizes: First prize, $300; 
second prize, $200; third prize, $50; next ten, 
$25 each, $250; next twenty, $10 each, $200; 
total, $1000. 



Kdldoyfi RICE KRISPIES 



57 



RADIO STARS 




.asier on YOU and on your 
clothes is the Rit way of dyeing! 

You'll glory in Rit's glowing colors — 
and you'll be grateful for this easy way to 
get them. Transform dresses, draperies, 
lingerie, or anything else that color bene- 
fits — so easily and surely now! 

Simply use Rit in warm water for the 
loveliest Tints imaginable. For dark shades 
(even black!)you can now get FAST COLORS 
without the harsh boiling that is so hard on 
fabrics. Rit contains an exclusive penetrat- 
ing agent that makes the color soak in 
deeper and set faster — quick and failure- 
proof. Use Rit for all tinting and dyeing! 

Rit is a concentrated wafer: easier to measure than pow- 
der; won't sift out of the package; dissolves instantly. 

INSTANT 




AT ALL DEALERS 



White Rit Color Re- 
mover . . . takes out 
color without harm- 
ing the fabric— really 
whitens white goods. 



JQiadlo StaU (2oolclnj School 



(Continued from page 50) 



their chairs to enjoy an hour of outstand- 
ing entertainment, characterized by its gen- 
eral air of high good humor. 

It all seemed so simple — "nothing to it 
at all !" I thought. Yet those "in the 
know" could tell you, as Fred Waring 
afterwards told me, that those minutes on 
the air represented hours of planning, days 
of rehearsing and actually years of ex- 
perience (many of Fred's "fellas" have 
been with him for six years). 

What is true in broadcasting is also 
true — fortunately in a more simplified 
sense — in the home. Where the perfect 
program that goes out from the studio is 
one that is planned and rehearsed until 
neither planning nor rehearsing is evident, 
so the perfect meal that comes out of the 
home kitchen is one that has been planned 
and prepared with an eye to achieving the 
same effect of casual perfection. The pro- 
gram-director who can give that impres- 
sion over the air waves is a success — the 
housewife who can achieve it in the home 
is a jewel! And both types have dis- 
covered that they must approach the prob- 
lem well in advance. Certainly any dinner 
I know of benefits tremendously by some 
constructive thought given it in the morn- 
ing, or even the day before. 

The big meal of the day, generally, plans 
itself around the main dish which in the ma- 
jority of homes most frequently is meat. 
The Waring penthouse home is no excep- 
tion in this respect. There a colored cook 
presides over the kitchen (under the 
watchful eye of Evalyn, Fred's wife) pre- 
paring for the evening meal any one of 
the many meats that the Warings like. 

During the day Fred eats very lightly, 
having a decided preference for dairy 
foods. On the day of the broadcast he 
scarcely eats at all, contenting himself 
with graham crackers and milk both be- 
fore and after the broadcast. On other 
days, however, he enjoys a hearty evening 
meal. 

Dinner in the Waring home features a 
good filling meat around which the rest 
of the meal is planned. A favorite com- 
bination of Fred Waring's is the one you 
see him eating in the picture — a thick slab 
of roast beef, with Bouillon Potatoes and 
New Succotash. Here are simple direc- 
tions for the potatoes and the succotash. 

BOUILLON POTATOES 

4 medium sized potatoes 

1 can condensed bouillon 

Peel and quarter potatoes. Place in 
small deep saucepan and cover witli canned 
bouillon. (If the bouillon does not cover 
potatoes add water.) Cover saucepan, 
bring contents to a boil and continue boil- 
ing gently until potatoes are tender. Drain 
off and reserve bouillon. 

The potatoes cooked in this way have 
a most unusual flavor. The bouillon in 
which the potatoes have cooked may be 
used for the soup course of that meal, or 
the one following, or it may be used to add 
flavor to sauces or gravies. 



NEW SUCCOTASH 

2 cups whole kernel corn (canned) 
3/4 cup milk 

1 cup fresh, cooked peas 

2 tablespoons butter 
1 tablespoon flour 

Y\ teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon sugar 

a few grains pepper 

Heat together corn and milk for 10 min- 
utes over boiling water in top of double 
boiler. Melt butter. Add flour, salt, 
pepper and sugar. Blend thoroughly. 
Add milk and corn mixture slowly to flour 
mixture. Cook over low heat, stirring 
constantly, until smooth and thickened. 
Add cooked peas. 

Not all of Fred Waring's favorite 
meats are as expensive as the Roast Beef 
that accompanied these two dishes, I am 
glad to report. Meat Loaf, for instance, 
appears frequently on the Waring menu, 
combining with beef such penny savers as 
veal, pork and bread crumbs. Here is the 
recipe given me by Evalyn Waring's cook: 

MEAT LOAF 

V/> pounds ground beef 

34 pound ground pork 

■J4 pound ground veal 
V/2 teaspoons salt 

Yz teaspoon pepper 
1 small onion, minced 

Yt cup bread crumbs 
juice of 1 lemon 
1 egg 

Yt cup milk 
Mix together all ingredients until 
thoroughly blended. Place in well greased 
loaf pan, pressing down firmly. Bake in 
hot oven (400° F.) \Yz hours. Remove 
loaf carefully to hot platter. Make a 
gravy of 2 tablespoons of fat in pan, add- 
ing flour, water and seasoning to taste. 
This meat loaf is delicious hot or cold. 

Roast Stuffed Veal, Country Gentleman 
Style, is another inexpensive meat dish 
that Fred likes. The potatoes that go 
with this, brown in the pan with the meat 
and the accompanying gravy is something 
to write home about. Or to write me 
about — for after all that's all you'll have 
to do to get this delicious recipe for your 
very own files. This is hut one of the 
recipes you'll receive in return for mail- 
ing in your coupon — for there are four 
knockouts in this month's leaflet. The 
other cards give you easy, tested directions 
for making three dishes that Fred Waring 
likes immensely — Ham with Cider Sauce 
(ideal now with the new cider just com- 
ing on the market) Southern Chicken and 
Rice Croquettes (did you ever know a 
colored cook who couldn't cook chicken 
and rice in many delicious ways? Well 
this one given by the Waring cook is one 
of the nicest ever ! And the last War- 
ing recipe, but certainly not the least in 
my estimation is Caramel Chiffon Pie. 
Fred's fondness for dairy foods explains 
why this dessert is a favorite of his. 

And why not prove to your own entire 
satisfaction how good these dishes arc by 



58 



RADIO STARS 



writing in for your own set of recipe 
cards ? It takes only a minute's time to 
fill in and mail the coupon. It takes only 
a short time for us to send your leaflet to 
you. And then it won't take you long to 
make up these dishes. 

But let me remind you again that no 
amount of recipes will help you to serve a 
good meal, if you don't give some real 
thought, well in advance, to its prepara- 
tion. In the morning get out the recipe 
card you plan to use for the main dish of 
the meal that night. If it is to be the 
Waring Ham and Cider Sauce (and I 
can think of no better suggestion) decide 
on the vegetables and potatoes or other 
starch that will accompany this dish. Make 
out your menu and your marketing list. 
And do your marketing early. 

Since the oven will have to be lighted 
for the ham anyway, why not decide on 
having sweet potatoes which can be put 
in to bake along with the meat? Scrub 
and grease the potato skins and have them 
ready to pop into the oven. Prepare your 
green vegetable. Spinach is excellent 
with ham but don't wait till the last hur- 
ried minute to wash it. 

If you have all these dinner preparations 
done well ahead of time and have your 
salad chilling and your dessert made there 
should be no last minute flurries of inde- 
cision, or late shopping sorties. 

Remember, when next you listen to the 
Fred Waring broadcast, that there have 
been five days of rehearsing before those 
sixty minutes of gay entertainment go on 
the air. Then you won't feel so abused 
when you have to give a few minutes of 
thought to your own most important hour 
of the day — the Dinner Hour. 

The Fred Waring recipes will be a great 
help to you so be sure to use the coupon to 
get your free copy of this month's Radio 
Stars' Cooking School Leaflet. 

This is Nancy Wood signing off. 

P. S. As a special "Prize for Prompt- 
ness" this month I will also send a copy of 
the leaflet containing Annette Hanshaw's 
favorite foods to the first couple of hun- 
dred who ask for it when sending in their 
Fred Waring coupon. I had some extra 
copies made because I felt many of you 
would certainly hate to miss having An- 
nette's Chocolate Angel Food recipe ! 
Women's liking for Angel Food goes on 
through the years, seemingly undimmed by 
the number of eggs required, while men 
will especially like this Chocolate version. 
If you are not one of the lucky gals who 
got their copy of this cake recipe, together 
with recipes for three other delicious 
dishes that petite Annette Hanshaw likes 
— or if you would like an extra copy to 
give to a friend — make a note of your re- 
quest on the Fred Waring coupon. But 
it's first come, first served. 



Please send me the free leaflet 
containing recipes for three of 
Fred Waring's favorite Meat Dishes 
and the Caramel Chiffon Pie. 

Name 

Address 

City 

State 



JIM LOVED THE SPAGHETTI WE 
HAD AT YOUR HOUSE. HOW DO YOU 
MAKE THAT MARVELOUS SAUCE? 



MARY, YOU CAN BUY THAT 
SPAGHETTI RIGHT HERE IN THIS 
STORE! IT COMES ALL 
.READY-PREPARED 




Beats my home-cooked 
spaghetti a mile- 

quicker, easier— costs less, too!" 



I don't wonder Mary was surprised. 
I certainly was the first time I 
tasted Franco-American. Up until 
then I firmly believed no ready-pre- 
pared spaghetti could possibly be as 
good as home-cooked. But Franco- 
American is actually better — ever so 
much better! I use it all the time 
now and I've told a number of my 
friends how delicious it is. 

"We all agree it has the best sauce 
we ever tasted. In fact, we never 
knew how good spaghetti could 
be till we tried Franco-American!" 

Good? No wonder! 

Franco-American chefs use 
eleven different ingredients 
they prepare 



when 

delectable sauce, 
puree, lusciously 



their 
Tomato 
smooth 
and rich. Golden Cheddar 




cheese of just the right sharpness. 
Selected spices and seasonings, each 
one adding its tiny bit more of zest- 
ful flavor and delicate piquancy. 

"Why should I bother with home- 
cooked spaghetti now?" women are 
saying. "I never could make as good 
a sauce as this. And I'm not even 
going to try." Franco-American is so 
much easier, too. No cooking or 
fussing — simply heat and serve. 

And here's a pleasant surprise. 
You pay less for it than if you bought 
all the different sauce ingredients 
plus the cost of cooking 
them. And isn't the time 
you save worth something, 
too? Ask your grocer for 
Franco- American today. A 
can holding three to four 
portions is never more 
than ten cents. 



59 



RADIO STARS 



'Too 0*ld to Pieam ? 

(Continued from page 34) 




AnyW oman 
can be 

Up to Date 

(in her information) 

A great deal of the talk among women, on 
the subject of feminine hygiene, had better 
be disregarded. Some of it is garbled, in- 
correct, perhaps even dangerous. And some 
of it is just plain old-fashioned. Here are 
the facts, for any woman to read, and bring 
herself up to date. 

With Zonite available in every drug store, 
it is old-fashioned to think that poisonous 
antiseptics are needed for feminine hygiene. 
There was a time in the past, when certain 
caustic and poisonous compounds actually 
were the only antiseptics strong enough for 
the purpose. But that day ended with the 
World War which brought about the dis- 
covery of Zonite. 

Zonite is the great modern antiseptic- 
germicide— far more powerful than any 
dilution of carbolic acid that can be safely 
used on human flesh. But Zonite is not 
caustic, not poisonous. This marvelous 
Zonite is gentle in use and as harmless as 
pure water. Zonite never injured any 
woman. No delicate membranes were ever 
damaged by Zonite, or areas of scar-tissue 
formed. 

It is hard to believe that such power and 
such gentleness could ever be combined— 
as they are in Zonite. But what an ideal 
combination this is— for the particular re- 
quirements of feminine hygiene. 

Also Zonite Suppositories (semi-solid) 
Zonite comes in liquid form— 30c, 60c and 
$1.00 bottles. The semi-solid Suppository 
form sells at $1.00 a dozen, each pure white 
Suppository sealed separately in glass vial. 
Many women use both. Ask for both 
Zonite Suppositories and Liquid Zonite by 
name, at drug or department stores. There 
is no substitute. 

Send for the booklet "Facts for Women." 
This is a frank and wholesome booklet- 
scientific and impersonal. It has been pre- 
pared for the special purpose of bringing 
women up to date. Don't miss reading it. 
Just mail the coupon. 

USE COUPON FOR FREE BOOKLET 

ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION RS-511 
Chrysler Bulldinit. New York. N. Y. 

Pleeae send me free copy of the booklet or bookleU checked below. 
( > FectB for Women 
< ) Use of Antiseptic* In txio Home 

NAME 

/'/..,.. print name) 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 

(In C en Ida: SeJnte Thcreae, I' Q.) 



the funny little cap and bright striped 
blazer of the university. We were too 
young to realize we were sweethearts. 

"Now I was a musician, with the first 
laurels of a concert master being heaped 
on me. I was old enough to have a girl. 
For months I saw her every day, and 
every day I loved her more. We drove 
through the park behind smart trotting 
horses, we dined and drank at sidewalk 
cafes, we danced at every gay party in 
town. We — well, I was in love. I thought 
I could not live without her. 

"But I wanted to know if she could 
live without me. I decided to test her 
love. There was a fashionable swimming 
club along the Danube; we were going 
there for the first time one afternoon. 
The swimming master tied a long rope 
around my waist to find out whether I 
could swim in the strong current. Now 
was my chance. If I dove under the raft 
and slipped from my belt, I could rise 
free on the other side. I knew the rest : 
my girl would faint, the guard would 
jump in and save me, and everything 
would end happily. We would go to a 
cafe later; there would be music and danc- 
ing. She would hold tightly to me, tell 
how scared she was while I was drown- 
ing. . . . 

''Well, I did dive in, and I fastened my 
belt to the raft. But everything else went 
wrong. It was the guard who fainted, and 
my girl who jumped in to save me. She 
couldn't swim. I had my hands full; she 
was saved — but I was lost! My little 
practical joke had ended in tragedy. She 
was through with me ; she had seen 
through the whole silly business. Her 
warm, full heart which had been full of 
a love that needed no testing was cold 
and bitter now." 

Try as he would, Romberg failed to 
win her back. All his little blandishments 
which before had been so effective now 
were met with terse requests to "go 
away". And without her Budapest seemed 
suddenly empty, lifeless. Even its gay 
music fell on dull cars. She had told him 
to go away; now he felt like it. Perhaps 
in America he could forget ; things might 
be different there. 

Brokenheartedly his parents watched 
him sail. This was one sort of explosion, 
one unhappiness against which they had 
never thought to guard their sheltered 
son. 

In the new world Sigmund Romberg 
found that the praises of Budapest and 
Vienna had preceded him. But there were 
other things to worry about. New York 
producers frankly were not interested in 
European dilettantes. How, they asked 
him, could he write soul-stirring music 
when he never had felt the pangs of 
poverty ? 

Still he continued to write. To get a 
good job playing in an orchestra would 
have been easy, with his reputation ; but 
this was not what he wanted. At the 
musicians' clubs he met other composers 
— thin men, underweight from overwork, 
hollow-eyed. They were poor, hungry, yet 



the producers did not want their music 
either. What did they want? Perhaps, he 
thought, they would like him better if he 
were American and spoke their language. 

He applied for naturalization papers 
and enrolled at night-school. His knowl- 
edge of the violin, piano, organ, bass viol 
and cello he shared freely with others. He 
even took a job as violinist in a pit 
orchestra of a musical comedy. He wrote 
sketches, submitted them to every pro- 
ducer and recognized actor along the 
Great White Way. Was this enough? 

It must have been. One of his sketches 
was accepted. Sigmund Romberg, humble 
violinist in an orchestra, could sell music 
where Sigmund Romberg, son of w : ealth, 
could not. 

In the production which used his first 
sketch were three young actors just get- 
ting started. Al Jolson had not yet 
thought of blackface, and was playing 
straight as stooge for Willie and Eugene 
Howard. Long after the last curtain had 
fallen on the first performance, the three 
comedians and the young composer sat in 
a cheap beer garden listening with critical 
ears to the hackneyed ragtime of the day. 
They realized that Sigmund Romberg 
could easily have bought his way into any 
production on Broadway ; they knew, too, 
why he had never done so, why he never 
would. And they admired him for it. 

As they sat musing, a girl came to their 
table. She was selling songs, inducing 
customers to stay for one more round 
of foaming steins. Suddenly Sigmund 
Romberg smote the table with his big 
hand. He would write an operetta! He 
would call it "The Midnight Girl". Great 
bowls of pretzels disappeared, washed 
down with stein after stein, as the four 
sat and planned. Dawn crept over the 
jigsaw sky-line of Manhattan when they 
finally parted and went wearily home. 

Confident, almost over-confident, the day 
"The Midnight Girl" opened at the Win- 
ter Garden Theatre Sigmund Romberg 
quit his orchestra job. If no one else 
knew his show would be a success, he him- 
self was certain of it. So were the critics, 
the morning after. He immediately signed 
a contract to write another farce with 
music, "The Girl of New York". At last 
America was giving him recognition. His 
light and breezy tunes were hummed and 
whistled all over the country. 

In four years he had become as Amer- 
ican as the rest. When the United States 
plunged into the maelstrom of war, Citi- 
zen Romberg was among the first to for- 
get his own tender "Auf Wiedcrsehcn" 
for martial strains. He enlisted in the 
infantry, but never felt the grip of a 
machine gun. Because lie spoke German, 
Hungarian, Polish and Serbian fluently, 
he was transferred at once to the Intelli- 
gence DepartiiK'nt. City after city he 
visited as a secret service agent, ostensibly 
searching for musical ideas, in reality 
keeping his eyes and ears open for valu- 
able information. He could identify spies 
uncannily, and with his winning manner 
wormed important secrets from them. 



60 



RADIO STARS 



When the war was over he went back 
to Broadway. The first people he looked 
Up were his old pals, Al Jolson and Buddy 
De Sylva. (De Sylva had written the 
lyrics for his first operetta.) 

"Times had changed," Romberg said. 
"It was the age of aspirin and jazz, and 
all our old haunts were closed. We de- 
cided to write a show together. So we 
went to a resort in the Adirondacks where 
we could live bachelor-fashion and not 
even shave until our work had been com- 
pleted. Our cottage happened to be named 
'The Lion's Den', and believe me, we all 
looked like Daniel after the first week ! 

"We worked hard from sunrise till din- 
ner every day, and each night we gave a 
concert for the other guests. Jolson sang 
the ballads, Buddy played the ukulele, and 
I hammered on the old piano. . . . One 
day some new visitors arrived, prominent 
people from Washington. But we didn't 
care. We wouldn't shave. We weren't 
senators — we were musicians. If they 
wanted to hear our music they could come 
to 'The Lion's Den' and see us as we were. 

"Well, they did. With them came the 
loveliest woman in the world. I played 
for her alone, and when she left that 
night it was with a promise to be my 
guest at tea the following afternoon. All 
bets were off. I had to look presentable 
for her, so I shaved. Al and Buddy kidded 
me unmercifully, but I didn't care — I was 
in love. . . . Over an hour I waited, hot 
and uncomfortable in a stiff collar and 
tightly buttoned coat. Then she came up 
the walk. She looked at me in bewilder- 
ment. She didn't even like me now 1 I 
was a different man, she said — too square- 
jawed and red-cheeked, and not half as 
cute as I seemed the day before! 

"She refused to have tea with me. I 
vowed I'd make her pay for humiliating 
me and I did. I grew another beard — and 
I married her !" 

His happiness complete, Romberg 
turned toward writing compositions of a 
finer, more lasting quality. Work — he 
was a slave to it. But it brought him 
fame ; he was feted like a king, pointed 
out everywhere by eager hero-worship- 
pers. Women adored his personality and 
charm ; men admired him for his genius. 
Naturally, this adulation had its effect on 
him. 

"I took things, people, too seriously," 
he realizes now. "I was as temperamental 
as Duse. The Musicians' Union was wrong 
because I disagreed with them ; Actors' 
Equity crossed my young path and there 
was another battle. I was Romberg, the 
most sought-after writer in New York, 
and I let everyone know it." 

All this passed with youth, however ; 
today, far more signal honors have been 
heaped on his wide shoulders, yet he lives 
like a simple country squire, in harmony 
with everyone. The years have mellowed 
him ; he is content. Only one thing mars 
his happiness, his longing for a son has 
never been gratified. But all the energy, 
all the devotion he would have expended 
on a family of his own he gives to others. 
Sigmund Romberg is perhaps the gentlest, 
most charitable man in the theatre, a pro- 
fession which prides itself on bringing joy 
and help to those less fortunate. 

Five years ago he visited a children's 
hospital along the Hudson, merely two 
rude frame buildings with an inadequate 




The Blonde's skin 
brightened— 

"At The Brunette's was 
shades clearer 

BLONDE: "Look! Your Brunette powder 
makes my skin glorious!" 
BRUNETTE: "No more Brunette for me! 
Your Rose Cream makes my skin clearer." 

The two girls had happened on some- 
thing that many a woman can benefit by. 

Creamy-skinned, Miss Hope Gatins 
(left) had deadened her skin with too light 
a powder. Miss Marjorie Striker, dark- 
haired, had dimmed her fair skin with 
too dark a powder! 

Then, how can I find my shade, you 
ask. Study your skin — not your hair, nor 
your eyes! Is it sallow? Your powder can 
brighten it! Dull? The right powder will 
make it clear! 

But old-style, deadening shades can't 
do this! 

With an optical machine, Pond's tested 
over 200 girls' skins. They brought to 
light the hidden tints that make skin 



Over 200 girls' skin color-analyzed to find 
the hidden tints in lovely skin now blended 
invisibly in Pond's new Face Powder. 



beautiful. In blondes, a suggestion of 
bright blue intensifies that delicate trans- 
parency. In brunettes, a hint of brilliant 
green brings sparkling clarity! 

Now these magic tints are blended in- 
visibly into Pond's new shades. Try them 
— see the difference! Each does some- 
thing special for a different type of skin. 

Rose Cream — gives radiance to fair skin 
Natural — lighter — a delicate flesh tint 
Brunette — clears creamy skins 
Rose Brunette — warms dull skins — tones 

down ruddy ones 
Light Cream— a light ivory tone 

See how delicately Pond's clings. Won't clog 
or cake. As natural as skin itself! 



Reduced 

SS C size now 35^ 
$1.10 size now 7<K 



5 Different Shades FREE!— Mail Coupon Today 

(This offer expires January I, 1936) 

POND'S, Dept. L126 Clinton, Conn. Please send me free s different shades of 
Pond's new Powder, enough of each for a thorough 5-day test. 



Street_ 
City_ 



Copyright. 1935. Pond's Extract Company 



61 



RADIO STARS 



Ac 

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EYE 
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staff of nurses. Romberg returned to New 
York; in Park Avenue mansions and Fifth 
Avenue palaces he appealed to his many 
influential friends, with the result that 
debutantes donned grease paint and dow- 
agers gladly forsook their ermines to put 
on costumes for charity. More than a 
million dollars was raised through his 
ceaseless efforts. The Dobbs Ferry Hos- 
pital was built so that two hundred and 
fifty tots no longer need fear the ravages 
of fire. 

Two years of untiring devotion during 
the most productive period in his life had 
been given up to charity ; now he must 
work for himself. Romberg returned to 
his penthouse apartment to try a new 
experiment in music. For the first time 
large choruses of men and women took 
the place of the dancing ensemble on the 
stage. The libretto told the story of the 
boy Schubert, and the score was based 
on the sweet-sad themes of the great com- 
poser himself. Months turned into years 
and Broadway still thronged to "The 
Student Prince". Nine companies poured 
its tunefulness into eager ears all over 
the world. Romberg rose to higher fame 
than he had ever dared to dream. 

But happiness was not to be his for 
long. He returned to Vienna in mourning 
while the world hummed his gay tunes 
and proclaimed his genius. Gay parties 
given in his honor failed to make him 
happy now. Vienna, city of youth and 
song, he left behind the day his father's 
funeral was over. 

In Berlin he sat with two friends, pre- 
tending to be amused, hiding in false 
laughter the deepest sorrow of his life. 
First one of them wrote several bars of 
music on a menu and handed it to Sig- 
mund saying : "Here, play this ; it is art." 
Then the other pulled an envelope from 
his pocket, scrawled two bars of music 
and handed it to his sad-eyed friend from 
America. 

Tired, bored, Romberg rose solemnly, 
pushed the beer mugs aside and drew on 
the tablecloth one simple bar, headed by 
the word "Andante". Pointing to it, he 
said: "Here, you play. This is art." 

In bewilderment, the two men picked 
the cloth up and carried it to the piano. 
Then, in unison, "How is this possible?" 
they exclaimed. "One hand at one end 
of the piano, the other at the opposite 
end. . . . How do you expect us to play 
the middle C?" 

"With your nose," sighed Romberg, as 
he rose and left the beer garden. 

Two days later he was on his way back 
to America. The memories of his father 
could not be blotted out. The very 
genuineness of his grief refuted the aura 
of make-believe his lilting music had 
built around him. Sigtnund Romberg hid 
from the world. Work was his only 
solace. Titles, words, a catchy phrase, a 
line of verse — anything was apt to start 
him on an orgy of writing. He would 
work for days, weeks at a time, trying 
to transfer to paper some of the loneliness 
and sadness that was in his heart. 

"The Desert Song", one of Hollywood's 
first talking musicals, was written during 
this period. Money poured in from all 
sides, but dollars and cents from a fawn- 
ing public meant nothing now. Sigmund 
Romberg knew at last what sorrow was. 
The producers who had turned him down 



because he never had suffered should have 
seen him. He needed sympathy, friends, 
himself. 

Instead, from Pittsburgh, came word 
that a young acquaintance wanted to be- 
come a professional singer. Could Rom- 
berg in any way help "just once more"? 
. . . Help others ! Help others, when his 
own heart was breaking? Of course he 
would. Other people's troubles were his 
salvation. 

When he saw the tall, lanky young man 
standing before him in awe, like a boy 
gaping at the president, he had his first 
good laugh in a long time. 

"I listened to him sing because I knew 
the earnestness in my own heart years 
before when I was asking for a chance. 
I told him that if he could get a letter 
granting him leave of absence from his 
bookkeeping job I would help him. Six 
weeks later I placed him in the chorus of 
my own show "New Moon", and sent 
him to a prominent voice teacher. I 
watched that boy slaving at his music 
with all of youth's eagerness, and when 
Hollywood offered him a contract not even 
he was as happy as I. Today you hear 
him as a leading man in pictures. . . . 
Who is he? That doesn't matter. But he 
deserves every happiness life can give 
him. 

"Oh yes," his broad, friendly smile 
lightened up his kind face. "Here is some- 
thing that might interest you. Last year 
I received a letter from the Death House 
at Sing Sing. It was from one of those 
hospital kids who recalled that I had 
once been kind to him. He asked me to 
help him now. ... A strange letter, from 
a strange place. But suppose that were 
my son, condemned to die — I would want 
some one to help him. With the aid of 
friends I got that boy a reprieve and a 
new trial — his case comes up next Sep- 
tember. I believe he's innocent, and I'm 
sure he will be freed." 

This is the man I know, the Sigmund 
Romberg who lives quietly, surrounded 
by his six thousand beloved volumes of 
music, his organ and grand piano. If his 
home were as big as his heart, visitors 
could move more easily among the 
crowded chairs and settees, while 
"Rommy" clears away sheaves of manu- 
script with sweeping gestures of both 
great arms. 

He is the man who always has brought 
happiness to everyone and everything. Yet 
Broadway once tried to hold him back 
because he was not poor, because he never 
had suffered ! That's why he knows that 
talent visits in wealthy homes as often 
as in hovels, why he realizes that riches 
can hold one back as relentlessly as 
empty pockets. Ask any of the many stars 
he has befriended — Yivienne Segal, Rosa- 
line Green, Lila Fisk, Mary Taylor, Jea- 
nette MacDonald, Janis Jarrett. Ask 
Helen Marshall, the Joplin, Missouri, 
script girl, who gave her a chance at radio 
stardom. Ask who made them famous. 
They will fall over themselves to tell you 
it was Romberg. He wasn't interested in 
how much money they had — it was be- 
cause they had talent that he helped them 
all. rich or poor. 

We sat for a long while in his dress- 
ing room at NBC. He has a special loud 
speaker rigged up, which I imagined was 
to bring him music exclusively. But I 



62 



RADIO STARS 



soon found out that "Rommy" is a great 
football enthusiast. Here, during leisure 
moments, he sneaks away and listens to 
all the big games. He even hired a page 
boy last fall to take down the scores 
while he was rehearsing or conducting. 

William Lyon Phelps was already on 
the air when we entered the glass enclo- 
sure to watch the broadcast. But all eyes 
turned toward the great musician as he 
ascended the platform. "Rommy" tapped 
first one foot, then the other, on the dais. 
He fingered the gardenia in his lapel — 
forty-five seconds ! He was really nervous 
now as he declined the paper cup of water 
offered by an attendant. Beside him stood 
one of his secretaries, who turns pages 
for him. . . . The music starts, he smiles 
broadly as the great orchestra goes into 
some theme which he has just composed. 
Perhaps he is thinking, remembering the 
past, when as a lad of seventeen he con- 
ducted another great orchestra in Buda- 
pest. 

Whatever his thoughts may be, his smile 
disappears as he lowers his Napoleonic 
baton. A girl rushes forward handing him 
a freshly polished pair of horn-rimmed 
spectacles. The music which can't be 
conducted with glasses on is forgotten for 
the script which can't be read with glasses 
off. "Rommy" is now the actor — until the 
program ends. Then he mops his brow, 
plunges his handkerchief hurriedly back 
into his pocket and walks off, smiling, 
bowing right and left. Another perform- 
ance has been added to his memories. 

Memories . . . memories. He looks back 
now on his fiery, turbulent youth and 
smiles tolerantly. How different now is 
his creed of life from what it was in those 
days. "Happiness is so simple," he says. 
"I believe it consists of little things like 
rising early every morning, with a smile. 
If you never keep a grouch over five min- 
utes you won't get in much trouble. . . . 
Don't expect the world to be as you want 
it. Take it as you find it — and you'll find 
it's a pretty good old world, after all. 
Besides," he smiles, "it's more fun being 
surprised than disappointed 1" 
The End 



Meet tke A/ew 



Jlannu fa 



anny 

(Continued from page 15) 



How they had come, filling the street and 
stopping traffic, eager to catch sight of 
the boy whose sincere voice had thrilled 
them in their homes. After that it was 
easy to make money. But that was sing- 
ing. . . . This — this was acting. And the 
critics said he couldn't act! 

Well, it is no secret that in the village 
of White Plains on a bare board stage 
Lanny Ross found himself. He got the 
answer he wanted. He showed the world 
he could act. 

It was really that performance, I think, 
that made possible the new announcement 
line he uses on the air: "Lanny Ross pre- 
sents . . " 

I know it was that performance which 
completed his "coming of age." 




BETTY: What's the matter? 

BABS: (in tears) Tom's mother told 
him I was careless! And I did so 
want to make a good impression. 



BETTY: I don't like to say it but I'm 

afraid I agree with her. 
BABS: Just because I had that little 

bit of a stain under my arm? 





BETTY: Yes! Your dress will never 
be really fresh and new -looking 
again. 

BABS: But everybody has trouble 
sometimes with perspiration. 



BETTY: Of course! That's just why 
you shouldn't risk a dress even 
once without Kleinert's Dress 
Shields. 

BABS: I'll sew some in this very day! 
Then my dresses will last longer, 
too! 



Fashion advisers recommend Kleinert's Dress Shields for 
every dress because the underarm is the part most likely to 
show signs of wear. Whatever threatens the smartness of your 
dress— friction, perspiration, or corrosive chemicals — a pair of 
Kleinert's Dress Shields will give you the assurance of guaran- 
teed protection. Genuine Kleinert's Dress Shields now cost 
as little as 25c a pair— why be imposed upon by substitutes? 




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63 



RADIO STARS 




This is the rrorher And scrapes and peels 

Who trudges and shops; And shreds and chops: 




Now she's in tears; 



"Why not use Gerber's 




And she's asking,"Why?" Before I die?" 



• • • 



they're good for Baby! 

Your baby's proper nourishment comes first, of course. 
So the big point to remember is that these foods are 
specially good for your baby. 

We strain vegetables many times finer than you can. 
We cook them with air shut out, to guard against loss 
of vitamin C. We save water-soluble vitamins and min- 
erals that you often pour off with the cooking water. 

And Now — Shaker-Cooking 

Best of all, there's a new, exclusive Gerber process — 
Shaker-Cooking. It "stirs" the contents of the can, 
allows the heat to penetrate more quickly and uni- 
formly, shortens the cooking time and makes Gerber 
Strained Vegetables fresher looking and fresher tasting 
than ever before. That's saying a lot— for we grow our 
own, and pick them fresh, in our own Michigan gardens! 
For baby's sake — and yours — use Gerber's. 



Hundreds of thousands of babies have been fed 
the modern Gerber way on recommendation of 
physicians. Every Gerber product has been ac- 
cepted by the American Medical Association's 
Committee on Foods. Ask your doctor. 
. . . Remember that these products are 
unseasoned— salt or sugar may be added 
ro meet yout baby's individ- 
ual taste or requirements. 




Strained Tomatoes . . . Green 
Beans. .. Beets. . .Vegetable Soup 
. . . Carrots . . . Prunes . . . Peas . . . 
Spinach . . . A'A-oz. cans. Strained 
Cereal . . . A l A and 10X-oz. cans. 

erber's 

Shaker-Cooked Strained Foods Df^^-i 

MOTHERS'. Send/or these two helpful books 
(Check book wanted) 

□ 1. "Baby's Book," by Harriet 
Davis, R. N., former instructor in 
nursing. Practical information on 
baby's daily care. SEND 10c. 

□ 2. "Mealtime Psychology," by 
Lillian B. Storms, Ph. D., widely 
distributed to mothers by physi- 
cians for its practical aid in devel- 
oping normal eating habits. FREE. 
(Enclose 10c additional if you wish 
picture of the Gerber Baby, ready 
for framing. 1 

/j^Gerber Products Company 
Fremont, Michigan 
/1l~><^ (In Canada: Grown and 
V-O/ Packed by Fine Foods of 

^v«f Canada, Ltd. ,Tecumseh,Oni.) 

Name ....... 

Address - 

City - -....State. 




Somebody asked me recently : "What 
about the women in this man's busy life?" 
That is easy to answer. Three years 
ago he told me of his youthful love for 
a girl in Sweden. Since then, his name 
has been mentioned with that of but one 
other woman. She is Olive White, and 
she is Lanny's manager. 

On Monday evening, July 29th, at eight 
o'clock, Lanny and Olive were married in 
a simple ceremony at Millbrook, N. Y. 
They first met in 1932 and a few months 
later she assumed the management of his 
radio and motion picture engagements. 

It was Olive White, herself, who per- 
suaded Lanny to accept that New Jersey 
theatre engagement — indeed, she arranged 
it. Since then, she has handled most of 
his business affairs. Yes, even a large 
extent of Lanny's "growing up." 

I mean just this. Three years ago, Lanny 
was only a name. Of course, he was 
drawing a king's ransom for singing and 
every girl's dormitory pulsed to his bal- 
lads but as yet he had not struck down 
enough roots to be an individual. I felt, 
when I first knew him, that he was a 
magnificent instrument for making musi- 
cal sounds, but little else. As a man, he 
was less important and less colorful than 
he was as a star. Which meant there 
was no telling what might happen to him; 
how he might go. 

So many people in that situation go fat- 
headed. Or pompous. Or else, they re- 
main empty the rest of their lives. You 
know many such, don't you ; men and 
women who are professionally successful 
but who are failures as individuals, be- 
cause they never do any of the things 
they want to. Because they never really 
have any fun. 

Lanny easily might have been like that. 
His success came when he was so very 
young. 

Last spring, he took his first vacation in 
seven years. I saw him just after he 
came back. Lanny, tall and lean, with 
the cleanest level blue eyes, and a speak- 
ing voice that is touched by exactly the 
same feeling that warms his singing. He 
told me about his rest; thirty days of 
letting time and fame shift for itself while 
he had done many of the things he had 
so long delayed doing. 

Last spring, he told me, "Well, I've 



made up my mind to become a singer." 

He'd made up his mind to be a singer! 
What else, in Heaven's name, had he been 
all along? 

Well, for one thing, he had been a law 
student. In the beginning, radio was just 
a means to earn money toward the com- 
pletion of his law course. I imagine the 
crash of his Hollywood pictures caused 
him to recall often that other career he 
had abandoned. 

Until he thought it through. "I went 
off by myself and cocked a cold and dis- 
passionate eye at all the years ahead of 
me," he told me. "Asked myself point 
blank if singing my way through those 
years gave me an even chance of finding 
the satisfaction and happiness which spell 
real success. Or if I'd better get into 
something else. Then I decided it was 
music for me. I've been studying ever 
since. Music itself, languages." 

After that, things began to happen. Co- 
incidence, perhaps, or something Olive 
White saw in the man she managed. 
Something that gave her confidence to 
plan bigger things for him. 

One of those bigger things was Lanny 
Ross as the showman presenting the 
Show Boat. You've heard the result these 
past weeks. Another big thing was 
Lanny's own concert series. The State 
Fair program is completely his own. An- 
other big thing is a big Hollywood motion 
picture. 

Lanny Ross and Olive White are a 
team to reckon with in today's entertain- 
ment world. Thursday nights at the 
Radio City studios, the crowds see him 
spotlighted on the stage, the idol, the 
hero, the singing star. But they never 
see her. Four floors below there is a 
little room to which only a few people 
ever find their way. She sits there alone, 
listening to the voice that fills the little 
room, making mental corrections that she 
will tell him when he joins her after the 
program. She sits there listening, while 
through her brain march dreams that 
match his — Carnegie Hall, the Metropoli- 
tan, La Scala . . . yes, even another fling 
at those treacherous Hollywood movies. 
Dreams that would be insane for anyone 
else but for which "Lanny Ross presents" 
may soon become only a stepping stone. 
The End 



Keep IJounj and Heautljjul 



(Continued from page 13) 



elevated on a pillow. That gives your 
feet a change of blood circulation. It's a 
good trick. Try it ! 

When you want to feel energetic enough 
to dance through a whole day, try Gogo's 
favorite salt rub in combination with your 
morning shower. Just take a handful of 
ordinary table salt and rub it over your 
body briskly while you're slightly damp 
from the shower. Then with a thorough 
rinsing and drying, your circulation will be 
all in a glow. The salt rub is a good thing 
to remember, now that the days are getting 
chillier. You'll need all the "glow" you 
can get. 

"I'm not going to fib," said Gogo, look- 
ing at me with a twinkle in her eye, "I 
do 110/ take cold showers. Tepid ones, 



yes, but cold ones, no." 

There's no pretense about Gogo. She is 
one of the most thoroughly natural per- 
sons I've ever met. And, naturally enough, 
we got around to the subject of make-up, 
which of course is always interesting to 
all of us experimental females. What docs 
she use? Well, a liquid rouge, for one 
thing, because of the natural effect it 
gives. It is slightly astringent, and only 
mildly colored, and leaves the cheeks with 
a sort of natural sheen. She applies it 
over her powder. When she uses eye- 
shadow, she generally chooses brown, in 
spite of the fact that her eyes arc blue, 
because it seems to tone in well with her 
skin, and thus looks more subdued and 
natural than blue eyeshadow does. You 



64 



RADIO STARS 




see, Gogo has lived in Hollywood, the 
world's greatest center for unnaturalness 
and artificiality. That has contributed to 
make her all the more wary of anything 
that tends in the least toward artificiality. 
Her French-Canadian background was 
anything but theatrical. All her relatives 
looked askance at the idea of Gogo "going 
theatrical" by profession. They got over 
it, but she hasn't got over her naturalness. 

Gogo says that her hair is not a lovely 
shade (I disagree with her), but that at 
least it's her own natural shade. Holly- 
wood wanted to bleach or tint it or do 
something Hollywoodish to it, but she re- 
fused all offers. It was her own shade, 
and she was going to keep it. You would 
appreciate why if you could see how beau- 
tifully it harmonizes with the underlying 
color tones in her skin. It is closer to an 
ash blonde shade than anything else, al- 
though it is a little too dark to be defi- 
nitely termed, "ash blonde." It belongs to 
her as part of her own symphony of color- 
ing. Every once in a while when you write 
me about bleaching your hair, or changing 
its color in some way or other, I feel like 
groaning aloud, and calling upon nature 
to defend its own handiwork. Why is it 
that we can't give nature credit for being 
the clever color chemist that she is? You 
would be wiser to worry about "sheen" 
than "shade." Apply the hairbrush, and 
one of those harmless rinses that bring 
highlights to your hair ! Be your own 
shiny-haloed self ! 

Gogo's color preferences in clothes are 
largely determined by her own coloring. 
She is very fond of gray, for example, 
and gray is something of an "individual" 
shade because so few people can wear it 
to advantage, as she can. If you have 
any such color individualities, capitalize 
on them ! Don't choose a color just be- 
cause "it's what they're wearing." Choose 
a color because it is flattering ! Gogo 
likes soft unusual shades of blue. They 
"do things" for her eyes, which are just 
as large as they are blue. 

Naturalness and individuality . . . 
there's a whole beauty sermon in itself. 

But let's get back to our original foot- 
notes. If you want slender ankles and 
shapely legs, you'll have to exercise a 
little energy, energy enough to cut out 
this coupon, and then to follow the instruc- 
tions the coupon brings. It will bring you 
exercises to reduce or build up the legs 
and thighs . . . and for good measure, 
exercises to slim down the hips. If you 
want a figure like Gogo's, you've got to 
work for it. 



Kindly send me your exercises for 
the legs, thighs, and hips. 

Name 

Address 



Please inclose self - addressed 
stamped envelope ! If you wish any- 
additional bulletins offered in past 
issues, kindly inclose additional 
stamped envelope. 
Mary Biddle, 
RADIO STARS, 
149 Madison Avenue, 
New York. N. Y. 



This little medicine-fighter has one of 
childhood's greatest worries licked. 
He has just been introduced to a laxa- 
tive that's a treat — Fletcher's Castoria! 




Even the taste of Fletcher's Castoria is 
made especially for children. A youngster 
takes it willingly . . . and it's important 
that he should. For the revulsion a child 
feels when forced to take a laxative he 
hates upsets his nerves and digestion. 

And — Fletcher's Castoria was made 
especially for a child's needs — no harsh, 
purging drugs in Fletcher's Castoria such 
as some "grown-up" laxatives contain. 

f7~-t "That's right — 
nfva^L Fletcher's 
S^y f^/i^ Castoria." 

Like the carefully chosen food you give 
your child, Fletcher's Castoria is ideally 
suited for a child's growing body. 

It will never cause griping pain. It 



does not form a habit. It is gentle, safe 
and thorough. 

' Tell your mom 
to get some 1 



Adopt Fletcher's Castoria as your child's 
laxative — until he is 11 years old. Get a 
bottle today — the carton bears the sig- 
nature Chas. H. Fletcher. Buy the Family- 
Size bottle — it's more economical. 



CASTORIA 

The Children's 
Laxative 




from babyhood to 1 1 years 




65 



RADIO STARS 



CHARLES FARRELL 
NATURAL LIPS 




Film star 
picksTangee 
Lips in inter- 
esting test 

• When Charles 
Farrell says he Charles Farrell makes lipstick 
' test between scenes or For- 

prefers natural bidden Heaven", a Republic 
lips, doesn't that Pictures Corporation release, 
make you want to have soft, rosy, kissable lips? 

Millions of other men dislike bright red lips 
too . . . that's why more and more women are 
changing to Tangee Lipstick. For Tangee can't 
make your lips look painted, because it isn't- 
paint! Instead, Tangee, as if by magic, accentu- 
ates the natural color of your lips. For those 
who prefer more color, especially for evening 
use, there is Tangee Theatrical. Tangee comes 
in two sizes, 39c and $1.10. Or, for a quick 
trial, send 10c for the special 4-piece Miracle 
Make-Up Set offered below. 

• BEWARE OF SUBSTITUTES ...when you huy, 

ask lor Tangee and be sure you see the name Tanget 
on the package. Don't let some sharp sales person 
twitch you to an imitation... there's only one Tangee. 



(Continued from page 17) 




★ 4-PIECE MIRACLE MAKE-UP SET 

THE GEORGE W. LUFT COMPANY MM11S 
417 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Rush Miracle Make-Up Set of miniature Tangee 
Lipstick, Rouge Compact. Creme Rouge, Face 
Powdet. I enclose 10(<(»ump»orcoin). IVinCanada. 

Shade □ Flesh □ Rachel D Light Rachel 

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Address 



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Garbo, for instance. She reminds me of 
Jessica Dragonette. Jessica has lots of 
natural beauty and with her new hair-cut 
she's prettier than ever, but the thing you 
feel about her is the mental force she puts 
into her job. She says a little prayer every 
time she sings, you know. And something 
more than her voice goes through the mike, 
just as something more than Garbo's ex- 
ternal appearance goes through the camera 
lens. Jessica is in pictures now, too. I 
wish Garbo were on the radio. That link 
between them — that depth — would be inter- 
esting to observe. 

Jean Harlow walks on to your set. She 
talks about books and philosophy and 
whether horse--racing is a good or bad in- 
fluence. You find she's one of the best- 
read women you've met. She has life all 
worked out. Live for today ! Forget to- 
morrow. It may never come. The past 
has gone. Why worry? Today is here. 
Let it do its best for you. And after ten 
minutes talking to Jean you are ready to 
launch a thousand ships. 

As for Myrna Loy. Now there is a 
woman a man can never forget. She has 
a knack which gives a man an entirely 
new thought about a woman. She can lis- 
ten. She leans slightly forward, a lithe, 
bright-eyed hollyhock, swaying slightly in 
a light breeze. Her eyes are stars twink- 
ling approval. Her lips part slightly like 
delicate petals awaiting rain. And your 
words are that rain. I guess I'm going 
poetic. But that's what Myrna Loy does 
even to a Benny. 

Myrna doesn't make a man feel like just 
an extra in life. He's the whole show. 
He's the star from the first moment he 
sits down with her until she says she must 
go, not with words but by gathering her 
hankie and bag and smiling the loveliest 
farewell you've ever had said to you. 

Of course, when you've met these women 
and come to know them, you remember 
radio. And you wish they were on your 
program. They'd bring the pulsating 
vigor of youth to the loudspeaker. Don't 
ask me how, but they'd do it — and it's 
something radio could use. 

As for Myrna, she's got a standing offer 
to join my hour. And she won't need to 
say a word. She can just sit there in the 
first row of the audience, where each of 
us can see her. We'll broadcast to her, 
in person. She'll make us so good, just 
by the way she listens, that we'll be better 
than our best. 

Now, here's a thing about this town I 
like, too. People have cut out the false 



modesty. And it's wonderful, I mean it. 
Most places, people talk about ego and 
conceit as if they were diseases. Well, 
I've still got to meet the guy who makes 
the other fellow believe in him unless he 
believes in himself. Take a kid. If he 
wins the high jump, he's proud and happy 
about it. He doesn't hide the fact he's 
done something big by saying : "Someone 
else took that jump for me." He knows 
he did it and he went a little higher than 
the other fellow. 

Somehow, outside of Hollywood, a man 
who's succeeded in his jump is supposed 
to act as though he didn't know he'd been 
jumping. He's supposed to show the world 
a face blushing from modesty when it 
should properly blush from pride. 

In Hollywood, they're honest. Here they 
don't brag about things they haven't done, 
but they are enthusiastic and bubbling over 
from excitement about what they have ac- 
complished. If Lupe Velez has just signed 
a contract for big money in South Amer- 
ica, she tells you about it. She tells you 
the salary, tells what a new fame in a 
new land is going to mean to her. She's 
a kid who's won another race and she 
wants everyone to enjoy the fact with her. 

Why, these folks out here like the way 
they act so well they play charades at pri- 
vate parties. They show each other their 
latest films ; their newest publicity pic- 
tures. They have photographs of them- 
selves sitting possessively on grand pianos. 
They are stars. They are important. They 
know it. And they expect and want you 
to know it. 

Yeah, it's a crazy town, and a grand 
town. I could go on for another ten mil- 
lion words about it. Hollywood, like a 
Hollywood party, never stops. Which re- 
minds me, the other night Mary and I 
threw a pretty sizable party for Fred 
Allen and Portland Hoffa. It was the 
first week of their stay out here and 1 
wanted them to meet all the right people. 

I was receiving the guests at my front 
door. One fellow I'd known around New 
York in the old days but hadn't met for 
some time saw me standing there. He 
came over and stuck his hand up. "Jack 
Benny! Of all people. What are you do- 
ing here?" 

He didn't realize he'd come to my party. 
And that's typical of Hollywood. 

P. S. I just read this over. I made 
an awful faux pas. I forgot to mention 
the name of the picture I came out here 
to make. It's "Broadway Melody of 1936." 
The End 



STOP ! ! ! Wouldn't you like to win a prize? 

On Pages 30 ami 31 of this issue — 314 prizes! Yes, sir! 
LOOK ! ! ! tnree hundred and fourteen of 'em — just waiting to 
be won! 

IICTCI1 III R eJH ' tne ru ' es — P ut on y° ur thinking can — and go 
Ll3 I til - - - in and win one for yourself. It's a eineh! 



66 



RADIO STARS 



eaven in 



{Continued from page 33) 

even bears the name of the room in which 
you are quartered. 

No, indeed, you don't sleep in a room 
with a number in the Vallee establishment ; 
you sleep in a room with a name. A year 
ago I'd heard the story of his naming 
rooms after famous songs he had popu- 
larized, and then had been only a little 
impressed. Let me tell you it is different 
when Theresa comes up to you and says 
you will sleep in "Betty Co-Ed." And 
dinner is served in "The Stein Song." 
And you can take a shower in "The Pink 
Lady." And how would you like to peek 
at "Vagabond Lover"? A tidy bronze 
name-plate is attached to every door. 

"Vagabond Lover" is Rudy's own room 
at the head of the stair, and if Theresa 
likes you she permits you to step within. 

The color scheme is blue, Rudy's favor- 
ite color, Theresa told us. He has a little 
balcony that overlooks the lake, a bath- 
room positively classic in its beauty and 
the usual twin beds, dresser, and other 
accoutrements. A perfect place for peace 
and relaxation. 

I forgot one thing about the guest rooms. 
Each has a lady's dressing-table. And each 
bears two cruets which hold two kinds of 
perfume — Paris perfume, mind you, in the 
heart of a Maine wilderness — of which the 
wives of visiting firemen can take their 
choice. I used it for two nights and I 
still can't quite believe it happened. 

A second building is a guest lodge, much 
like the first, but not so pretentious. A 
third houses the cars and truck and sev- 
eral servants. The fourth is called "The 
Pirate's Den" and is the daytime headquar- 
ters of all and sundry. 

Right away, we were told by Theresa 
that Rudy's system of entertaining was 
"every guest for himself." Do as you 
please and be happy. It's a nice formula, 
isn't it? "The Pirate's Den" is ideal for 
that sort of thing. It has, upstairs, a pool 
table, ping-pong, bar, and a bathroom. On 
the balcony are a half-dozen bagatelle 
games. Below, the building adjoins the 
boat and swimming float. 

Rudy has worked hard since that red- 
ringed day when he became a radio celeb- 
rity. His hours have been fantastic. For 
instance, the night we arrived at the lodge 
he was playing at a dance at Burlington, 
Vermont, hundreds of miles away. He got 
away from Burlington only a little while 
before dawn and drove through the sun- 
rise to Lake Kezar. It was 9 a.m. when 
he arrived. Can you imagine getting into 
bed at 9 a.m.? Some of his guests were 
just getting up. He slept until 3 and then 
came down to the lake for his swim. 

Sunday night he rested. Monday and 
Tuesday were supposed to be free, too. 
But on Monday he went down the road 
to a nearby town and helped them put on 
a show to raise money for some worthy 
cause. Tuesday night he drove to another 
town. He got no money for those jobs, 
but he sang as hard and entertained the 
crowds with as much energy and enthusi- 



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Name 

Address 

City 




Stale. 



67 



RADIO STARS 



Don't Fool 

Around with a 



COLD! 




Every Four Minutes Some One 
Dies from Pneumonia, Trace- 
able to the "Common Cold!" 



AON'T "kid" yourself about a cold. It's 
nothing to be taken lightly or treated trivi- 
ally. A cold is an internal infection and unless 
treated promptly and seriously, it may turn into 
something worse. 

According to published reports there is a 
death every four minutes from pneumonia 
traceable to the so-called "common cold." 

Definite Treatment 

A reliable treatment for colds is afforded 
in Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine. It is no 
mere palliative or surface treatment. It gets at 
a cold in the right way, from the inside! 

Working internally, Grove's Laxative Bromo 
Quinine does four things of vital importance 
in overcoming a cold: First, it opens the bowels. 
Second, it combats the infection in the system. 
Third, it relieves the headache and fever. Fourth, 
it tones the system and helps fortify against 
further attack. 

Be Sure — Be Safe! 

All drug stores sell Grove's Laxative Bromo 
Quinine in two sizes — 35c and 50c. Get a pack- 
age at the first sign of a cold and be secure in 
the knowledge that you have taken a depend- 
able treatment. 

Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine is the larg- 
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68 



asm as the times he was paid five thou- 
sand dollars a night. 

So he works hard — and for relaxation 
he plays hard. I found that out during 
my brief visit. His lodge in Maine is 
stocked with playthings. Grown-up play- 
things, of course, that only a man with a 
hundred-thousand-dollar income could af- 
ford, but nevertheless playthings. 

Look at his boats. In the first floor of 
"Pirate's Den" I counted fourteen. A 
Chris-Craft speedboat — the fastest thing on 
the lake, by the way — is his flagship. After 
it come sailboats, rowboats, canoes, scooters 
with powerful outboard motors, even two 
water bicycles. 

For the more athletically inclined there 
was a springboard, a slide, and an aqua- 
plane that trailed the speeding Chris-Craft 
like a leaping tuna on a line. A leaping 
tuna, by the way, that was ridden beauti- 
fully by a sprite of a girl barely out of 
her teens and from which my ambitious 
editor-husband tumbled three times before 
he gave up ignominiously. 

The most recently acquired plaything 
was a diving helmet which dropped down 
over your head until it rested on your 
shoulders. Then the seventy-five pounds 
of it shoved you gently under water while 
some trustworthy soul above pumped down 
air. I tried it and walked about the bot- 
tom of Rudy's lake with almost as much 
confidence as I would walk into my kitchen. 

Rudy himself is the champion diver of 
the camp. It was he who put on the hel- 
met and went out on the lake's bottom, 
tied a rope around a sunken tree that had 
menaced swimming and boating, and hauled 
it to the surface. 

In talking about playthings I shouldn't 
forget his cameras. This is an old love 
that has been publicized before. What 
hasn't been mentioned is that, during the 
past spring, he has had a projection-booth 
built into his lodge so that he can put on 
a motion picture show as good as any you 
get at the Bijou or Capitol. We saw one 
that Sunday evening — Rudy Vallee in 
"Sweet Music," plus short subjects and 
one natural-color reel he had taken of a 
cat-and-dog argument between the camp 
kitten and one of his dogs. 

That one of his dogs was Jim, a tremen- 
dous Great Dane, who could make a single 
mouthful of Shirley Temple, but who 
wouldn't harm a fly. Another is a Dobcr- 
man named Himmel, who races madly to 
the lake every time someone dives and 
won't leave until he perceives that the 
diver is not in immediate need of rescue. 

The third is Windy, Rudy's personal 
pet. Windy looks like a tall, thin Chow 
and acts like an uncaged tiger. Alone and 
unaided, I think, he could whip both Him- 
mel and Jim if he got his dander up. 

I am not sure Rudy would permit me 
to mention it, but I must say something 
about his open-handed hospitality. I under- 
stand my own week-end at his camp was 
quiet. There were only fourteen guests. 
The previous week, he had entertained 
fifty-four. 

One delightful couple we met was hon- 
eymooning. Friends of Rudy's, he had 
given them the run of his place — and 
where a more delightful honeymoon could 
be spent, I don't know. Another was the 
mother of a friend. Others were business 
acquaintances. Each year he invites his 
entire orchestra, with their wives and 
sweethearts, up for five days. This year, 



which was their fourth annual outing, he 
had them for three days of one week; 
and then the next week he put them up at 
Old Orchard Beach for three days, to 
give them a taste of the ocean. I do 
know of others, dozens of people to whom 
he owes nothing, but to whom he has of- 
fered the use of his lodge any time they 
wish it. Sometimes they call him and ask 
if he has a vacant room. 

"We'll make room for you," is his an- 
swer. 

And he does make room for them. Why? 
I think I know one of the reasons. I 
think he takes a little-boy sort of pleasure 
in showing his friends the kind of a place 
he has carved out of virgin forest. The 
meticulously furnished guest rooms, the 
broad sweep of his veranda. But most 
of all, I think he likes for them to see 
his bathrooms. 

I mean this seriously. There must be 
six or seven bathrooms in his lodges. Each 
one is done in pastel shades and is equipped 
with the very latest fixtures. My powers 
of description falter at the thought of 
them. Pull down the shade, blot out the 
sight of pines and the sound of birds and 
you might be in New York or Los An- 
geles. Their presence there is incredible, 
fantastic, and you are grateful all the 
more that the amazingly thorough Mr. 
Vallee has done it again. 

I wondered about the sheets, the towels, 
the pillow-slips required by such an estab- 
lishment. Theresa threw up her hands at 
my questioning. Women were the worst, 
she told me. They use a towel once and 
then look for a clean one. Fortunately, 
Rudy has more men guests than women. 

And the food? 

There were fourteen of us at dinner 
Sunday. I watched Manuel come from 
the kitchen with a huge tray carrying four- 
teen broilers. In my humble household, 
fourteen broilers would bankrupt the 
budget. I saw the milkman make an early 
morning delivery. He carried two wire 
baskets heaped with bottles. And cream! 
"Cream in your coffee" at the Vallee lodge 
means rich, golden, gooey cream, completely 
unlike the mixture to which my milkman 
had educated me. I'm still tasting it. 

Purposely I've stayed out of the kitchen 
until now. Because I don't really expect 
to be believed. But honestly the one I 
saw must be most housewives' idea of 
Paradise. To begin with, all the cooking 
is done by electricity. To continue, there 
are banks of ovens and burners and broil- 
ing racks that rival the famous electric 
range just installed in the White House. 
To finish it off, there is an electric refrig- 
erator that is the granddaddy of all the 
private home ice-boxes I've ever seen. It 
is tall and broad, and it needs to be. If 
you had, or if I had, fifty-four guests to 
feed over a whole week-end, I'm afraid 
we'd be borrowing shelves in refrigerators 
all up and down the block. 

Someone asked me about Rudy himself — 
the someone was a neighbor girl in the 
hero-worshipping stage. Was he sweet?' 
Was he handsome? Was he really as nice 
as he sounded ? 

One doesn't learn much about a man in 
a week-end, so my answers to her were 
probably unsatisfactory. I saw a Rudy 
who played through the hot summer day 
in a pair of trunks. That night ho donned 
sloppy white trousers, and suspenders. A 
white fleece sweater topped them off. 



RADIO STARS 



Search your skin 




I didn't have to tell my little friend he 
was as sweet and handsome as lie sounded. 
She was convinced of that already. What 
I did have to tell her was that Rudy re- 
minded me, a little pitifully, of a squirrel 
in a cage. As he climbs, the cage turns. 
The higher and faster he climbs, the faster 
the cage turns. He's at the peak now, and 
he must work furiously to stay there or 
the cage will spin away under him. 

This became especially apparent as I 
watched him play his phonograph. From 
the time he awoke at 3 p.m. until the cur- 
few hour of 2 a.m. he kept the machine 
going. One record after another from his 
vast and entertaining collection. Rudy 
Vallee songs and numbers recorded by 
other orchestra leaders. As they were 
changed or replayed by the automatic ma- 
chine, he listened intently, made criticisms, 
suggested improvements. As he swims, or 
rests or plays billiards, he listens. That 
phonograph has speakers in each of the 
lodge buildings. Wherever one is, the 
music comes to him. We had it straight 
through dinner. Once, during the evening, 
he stopped in the midst of conversation to 
dictate some notes to his secretary. 

Music has become his life. He eats it, 
breathes it, sleeps it. It is all modern 
music that sets a lusty rhythm going 
through your blood. He has helped make 
much of it, and it has helped to make him. 
They make a fine team, Rudy Vallee and 
rhythm music. 

Recently he bought one of the new elec- 
tric organs which are proving to be such 
a miracle instrument. Perhaps you have 
heard some of the broadcasts made with 
them. They produce the tones of the old 
pipe-organs, but occupy only a little space. 
Rudy's magnificent instrument stands across 
the room from the busy phonograph. Ex- 
cept for a few brief moments, it stood 
silent and neglected. 

Thinking of it, I found myself wishing 
that Rudy could get into his soul some of 
the chords of that unused organ. I wish 
its peaceful harmonies could soothe the fe- 
verish tempo of his life. Soft music and 
slow music can be so restful, and Rudy 
needs rest. I know. Oh, it wouldn't make 
a better man of him or a finer host or a 
gayer companion, but it would, I'm sure, 
make him happier. 

Somehow, after you have enjoyed his 
hospitality a little while you feel that he 
isn't quite happy and, darn it, he's the kind 
of a guy who deserves to be ! 

The End 



SJt Started mtk 
a Jlau^k 

(Continued from page 37) 



their first arrival would be a boy that 
they plucked 'William" off the old fam- 
ily tree, dusted and polished it and had 
it waiting for the little stranger. And 
even when they found that it wasn't that 
kind of a baby, they just couldn't go back 
on their plans. You see, Willie's parents, 
unlike herself, do not change boats in 
mid-stream. 

The End 




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69 



RADIO STARS 




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~fhe Original 

(Continued from page 36) 



waited around and hopped on the next 
boat that came along. On this boat was 
the prominent New York dentist, who 
offered her a job in his office which made 
her Atlantic City salary look like so much 
gum-drop money. And New York! The 
day-dreaming little Atlantic City stenog- 
rapher was sprouting wings ! 

Dreams do come true — if you dream 
them well and long and hard enough — and 
by this time our little love-lorn lassie had 
discovered what she really wanted. 

Patti lost no time in the Big City. She 
flashed her toothpaste ad smile and arched 
her Irish blue eyes at the Important Peo- 
ple who came into the office. She knew 
that sooner or later she'd start her own 
personal chain — you know, meet someone 
who could introduce her to someone who 
could introduce her to someone who could 
get her on the air. It required clear head- 
work, and the smile and eyes had to do 
sixteen-hour a day duty. 

Sure enough, the break did come. Oh, 
not as easy as all that. There was the 
small job with WNEW, a local radio 
station. 

Then the graduation to WOR. By this 
time Patti had an inkling that she was 
heading straight for a singing career, so 
she gave up the dental job and its regular 
Saturday pay-check to devote her after- 
noons to making the rounds of audition 
directors. 

And, friends, if you don't think that re- 
quires nerve, show me ten people who will 
give up a secure position just on a slim 
hope ! 

It was the audition at Columbia which 
clinched it for her. Last winter she 
made her debut on Jack Pearl's Peter 
Pfeiffer program and Columbia thinks 
there are big doings ahead for her on the 
airwaves. 

The night that she made her first net- 
work appearance, she received a telegram 
of congratulations from the old Boy 
Friend. She wired back one word: 
"Thanks." 

Maybe when he reads this story, he'll 
know just what she meant. 

The End 



TAey Called 4jim 

(Continued from page 37) 



became Stuart and the skinny little kid 
developed into a romantic singer who 
could get his listeners in a ga-ga mood. 

Because his voice and his boyish good 
looks fit in just swell with soft lights and 
sweet music and expensive, modernistic 
doodads, he was quickly grabbed by the 
more elegant of the New York night 
clubs. The Embassy, El Morrocco, the 
Versailles, the Westchester Bath Club, for 
instance — where a ham sandwich is paid 
for with a gilt edged security and you're 
liable to find a Whitney floating around 
in your soup. 

Stuart was looker-on to the high jinks 
of the hoity-toits and in no time at all he 
found himself calling the scions of Park 
Avenue by their pet names. He played 
Cupid to several society romances. John 
Jacob Astor and Tucky French, for in- 
stance, would trip to El Morrocco night- 
ly to hear Stuart sing "Melancholy Baby" 
for them. It was guaranteed to put them 
in that hand-holding, melting-eyed mood. 
Stu was present at one of the most lavish 
weddings in the social calender, the Win- 
ston Guest-Helen McCann nuptials which 
united two old families and fortunes. The 
reception lasted all day, and take his word 
for it, never have so many orchids, so 
many diamonds, or so much champagne 
ever been crowded under one roof. 

Do you want the lowdown on what so- 
city folks do to keep from getting bored? 
Stuart reports that at the Westchester 
Bath Club the main sport at night would 
be for the guests to start pushing each 
other, clothes and all, into the pool. 
Heaven only knows how many two- 
hundred-dollar de Pinna full dress suits 
or Hattie Carnegie creations were thus 
ruined! 

Stu got his radio job in a most acci- 
dental manner. It was just about the time 
that Dick Himber and Joey Nash, his 
former vocalist, had a falling out. Him- 
ber strolled into the Versailles one night, 
heard Stu and walked out with a new 
singer. 

Stu likes radio better than singing in 
night clubs. "The hours are much saner 
— and so are the people." 

The End 



'Scuse It, Please! 

Remember that lilting little yarn about Kathleen Wells which appeared 
in RADIO STARS for last July. It stated the blue-singing Katey was 
released from WHOM in New Jersey because the station was in financial 
difficulties. Now comes a letter from Harry O'Mealia, WHOM president, 
saying, "At no time has Station WHOM been in financial difficulties, 
and especially at the time of which she speaks." 

So that there can be no misunderstanding, we want readers who are 
interested to know the facts of the case, which are as presented by 
Mr. O'Mealia. For its error, RADIO STARS offers regrets. 



70 



RADIO STARS 



Ifou ffon t A/eed IZeauty 



(Continued from page 25) 



upholstered one yawned for the elfin body 
of the star. Accustomed to a place among 
the socially elite, and a leading light of the 
smart literary and artistic set, she com- 
pletely ignored the distinction and made 
for one of the small chairs. 

"Here's your place, Miss Hayes," the 
director pointed out. 

"Oh, I fit better into this one!" She 
smiled, and at the next rehearsal the larger 
chair was missing, undoubtedly at her 
request. 

Later on the director called time for 
lunch. He invited Miss Hayes to a res- 
taurant in Radio City, along with the spon- 
sor, explaining that there really wouldn't 
be time to frequent her usual rendezvous, 
the smart Park Avenue restaurants, hotels 
or clubs. 

"Is everyone going?" she asked. 

The rest of the company, she learned, 
were remaining. 

"Oh, let us all have our lunch here to- 
gether," she suggested. And along with 
the director, the sponsor and the rest of 
the cast she munched sandwiches, sipped 
a malted milk out of a container. 

Hollywood, with its caste system, its 
cliques of stars, featured players, bit per- 
formers and atmosphere hangers-on, all of 
whom keep to their particular sphere on 
pain of complete social annihilation, would 
be horrified. I think Helen gets pretty 



bored with that sort of thing, even after 
such successes as "The Sin of Madelon 
Claudet," "A Farewell to Arms," "An- 
other Language," and many others. Pic- 
tures never held the lure for her to which 
most of the great ones of the stage ulti- 
mately succumb. Probably that is because 
money means so little to her. She spends 
as she goes and, except for a trust fund 
for little Mary, she never has made any 
effort to insure material security. In her 
work, her husband and their child she al- 
ready has found it. 

Her contract with M-G-M calls for 
two more pictures but they permit her to 
fit the time with her stage engagements, 
and this fall she is to open in a new play, 
so the picture work will be deferred. Dur- 
ing the summer she remained East with 
Charlie, who was making pictures in As- 
toria (remember "The Scoundrel?") 

Never before has she been so happy. 

"To watch a rose grow," she says, "to 
get down on my knees in my garden and 
nurture it tenderly, spreading the bone- 
meal around with my fingers, feeling the 
kindness and closeness of the good earth 
is the most exciting, absorbing and satisfy- 
ing of careers. And radio permits me to 
have that and my work, too!" . . . And 
then there is Charlie, that good-looking, 
witty, irresponsible genius, who is her 
perfect companion, her dearest friend. And 



there will be more children. That is 
very important. 

Years ago MacArthur sent her this tele- 
gram : 

"Darling, if you marry vie you'll never 
be contented, but you'll never be bored 
exclamation point." 

I know she never has been bored. And 
I am sure she is contented. 

He is, of course, a delightfully interest- 
ing person — and an enfant terrible. 

Listen to this : 

When the Lux Radio Theatre was put- 
ting on "Peg o' My Heart," starring Mar- 
garet Sullavan and Bramwell Fletcher, 
Miss Sullavan suddenly was stricken with 
laryngitis. It was 12:45 on the Sunday 
afternoon of the broadcast, then scheduled 
for 2:30. The agency that put on the 
show was faced with the almost impossible 
task of securing a star to go on the air 
without any rehearsal. 

Desperate, they called the MacArthur 
home at Nyack. Charlie answered. He 
and Helen were having their usual Sunday 
"brunch" — a combination breakfast and 
lunch. 

Helen heard this conversation : 

"Um hum? ... I see . . . oh, yes ... I 

see — um hum . . . right away . . . yes . . . 

goodbye." 



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71 



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Helen ate on, tranquil and undisturbed. 

"Helen," Charlie explained, "Margaret 
Sullavan can't go on the air. You've got 
to do her broadcast. I said you would." 

"But Charlie — " Helen began. 

"Get going, darling," was his answer. 
"I'll see that the car's in front of the door 
in ten minutes." 

No time for anything. Helen threw her 
things on and Charlie brought the car 
around. 

But he hadn't mentioned a minor detail 
— what she was to do. That was his 
secret ! He knew that Helen, of Scotch 
descent, never had played an Irish role. 
Moreover she'd never seen "Peg o' My 
Heart," as a play or as a picture. She 
never even had read the script. 

They bustled into the car and along 
the highway Charlie's conversation was en- 
hanced by a thick brogue, Helen falling 
in with it merrily. They chatted and 
laughed, Charlie making occasional cor- 
rections in her dialect and Helen, smiling 
in blissful ignorance, having a swell time! 
She hadn't the slightest suspicion there 
was method in his madness — madness she 
was used to, without method ! 

As they crossed the George Washington 
Bridge MacArthur furtively glanced at her 
pert profile as he said : 

"And shure darlin' it's 'Peg o' My Heart' 
ye are to the life — and it's 'Peg o' the 
Radio Audience's Heart' you'll be afore the 
day is out !" 

"Charlie !" she whispered, "you 
couldn't . . ." 

"G'wan with your blarney !" he con- 
tinued, and along they sped to Radio City. 

She went on the air immediately, without 
having had time even to run through the 
script, Charlie remaining in the control 
room, the full weight of his responsibility 
facing him. As Helen's voice, tremulous, 
with a throb that holds and sways and 



said : "/ ees no interested. I dooz no wish 
to try for zee part." Then she rolled her 
eyes provocatively at the surprised man, 
and marched out. 

"I've got to talk to you," he yelled, run- 
ning after her. "I think you're just the 
person we need." 

He led Jessica into Morris Green's sanc- 
tum, buzzed into Mr. Green's ear excit- 
edly. 

"Then things happened fast," Jessica 
told me laughingly. "Mr. Green dismissed 
the important-looking actress he was in- 
terviewing, and porters rushed back and 
forth, pulling out a piano for me." 

Royally they waved her to the piano 
stool. "Sing something," both men com- 
manded. Jessica could hardly control her 
laughter. She sang, still with her put-on 
French accent, The Sunshine of Your 
Smile. 

"Wonderful," they said, when the last 
clear, sweet note had died away. "But 
what are we going to do with you? How 
will the public feel about your accent? If 
only you could speak English better." 

She pretended to be greatly hurt, and 
drew herself up stiffly to her entire five 



thrills, went out over the air waves, as 
clear and assured and right in its Irish 
accent as though it were being broadcast 
from Dublin, he registered increasing de- 
light. Her triumph is history. 

One of the production men asked Mac- 
Arthur how it was possible for a Scotch 
woman to do such a marvelous job in an 
Irish role. 

"She's Scotch and Peg's Irish," he ex- 
plained, "and anything an Irishman can 
do a Scotchman can — it's just like shooting 
fish in a barrel !" 

When the broadcast was happily over 
Helen was asked what price had been 
agreed upon. Price? Helen hadn't thought 
about that. It was simply that the show 
must go on ! 

"What," you will ask, "is Helen doing 
with the money she earns from radio? A 
new diamond bracelet, perhaps? Or a town 
car, or some sables?" 

You'd never guess, so I'll tell you. Her 
money is buying her father a farm in 
Maryland. 

And starting in September for twenty- 
six weeks over NBC you will be able to 
enjoy her charming voice and certain abil- 
ity in an original series which is being 
written especially for her. In it she will 
portray an average young woman con- 
cerned with the problems of everyday life. 

And that, if you ask me, is what she 
really is, only she's made a success of it! 
Beauty? Perhaps not. But charm and 
sincerity and real talent. As for there be- 
ing any trick to it, I have only to recall 
Helen's own words : 

"Everyone can have a successful career 
as a stage, screen or radio star, as a sales 
person, a model or a secretary. ... As 
Shakespeare said : 'All the zvorld's a stage,' 
it's only a matter of loving your work and 
working at it I" 

The End 



feet one and a half inches. Regally she 
pouted. "/ sink I speak zee English very 
well. I speak as good as you." 

"Yes, yes," they said placatingly. "But 
that French accent." 

For an hour they kept Jessica there, 
correcting her pronunciation, coaching her 
in English idioms. Then, when she 
thought the game had gone far enough, 
she spoke in her normally perfect English. 

They were flabbergasted, furious. Im- 
mediately their interest in her ceased. No, 
they couldn't use her. "To this day they 
haven't forgiven me !" Jessica told me. 

And the people she worked with in 
radio also learned that she wasn't the 
spineless, fragile, weak-willed songbird 
they'd been reading about. Ask the Coca 
Cola people. They'll tell you. Do you re- 
member when she was under contract to 
them as Vivian, the Coca Cola girl? Viv- 
ian was supposed to be a refined, charm- 
ing girl who traveled around the country, 
followed by two admiring suitors, Jimmie 
and Freddie. One week, when Jessica came 
for a rehearsal, she found that the part 
written for her was not in keeping with 
Vivian's character. She was expected to 



(Continued from page 43) 



RADIO STARS 



act the part of a cabaret singer. Common 
sense told her that a wealthy, inexperi- 
enced young girl would not turn cabaret 
entertainer overnight. She explained this 
to the director. 

"You don't like the part we've given 
you," he said impatiently. "OK, we'll give 
it to someone else this week. We'll write 
you out of the script." 

"But I'm supposed to be in it," she 
said. "Why not change the script a little?" 

"What's the matter, sister," he sneered. 
"Are you afraid the show wouldn't be any 
good without you?" 

"I know it wouldn't be any good with- 
out me," Jessica said in her quiet way. 
PS. The script zvas changed. 

Another time when Jessica revealed the 
fighting spirit of a young modern was four 
years ago. She was having a good deal 
of trouble with her sponsors, who insisted 
that she change the type of her program. 
It had too much high-brow music. It was 
jazz the public wanted. And it was jazz 
they meant to give it ! 

Do you think Jessica said : "Yes, sirs," 
meekly, blushed and hid, as accounts would 
have you believe she does? Like a defiant 
little squirrel, shoulders thrown back, tiny 
chin protruding, she stood her ground. 
And convinced the men she was right. Not 
only that, but ever since her contracts 
have read that she alone has the right to 
select her own singing numbers. 

But these were only flashes, kept care- 
fully concealed from the public. It would 
never do to let them learn that their angel 
with the nightingale's voice was really a 
shrewd business woman, quietly confident 
of her own abilities. 

Not till the present year did the mod- 
ern Jessica emerge, triumphant at last. 
And the cutting of her hair stands as a 
symbol — the only visible token of the bit- 
ter emotional strife that has been going 
on inside little Miss Dragonette. It is the 
decisive round in a long, hard-fought 
battle. 

Remember this. Three years ago most 
girls already had done away with their 
leng tresses. It was cooler. It was easier 
to comb. Short hair made you look years 
younger. 

Jessica longed to cut her honey-colored, 
waist-length hair and be like other girls. 
First her family dissuaded her. So did her 
business advisers. And when her fans got 
wind of what she planned to do, they wrote 
in, objecting. She wouldn't seem like 'our 
Jessica' if she cut off that luxurious head 
of hair : she'd be just another girl. And 
the illusion would be spoiled. 

For millions of photographs had been 
sent out of Jessica with her long, wavy 
hair, and that's the way they pictured her. 

To Jessica, the millions of her admiring 
fans are her life. They always come first. 
She no more dreamed of tearing down the 
illusionary figure they had built up of her 
than you or I would of murdering our 
best friend. So Jessica did nothing. But 
inwardly she kept thinking about it. 

Then suddenly, on June 19th of this 
year, she got a hair-cut. Risking her 
sponsor's wrath. Jeopardizing your affec- 
tions and mine, taking a chance on casting 
down the ideal we have built up. Why? 
Because the hidden, human side of Jes- 
sica conquered, overthrew once and for- 
ever the old-fashioned image that had been 
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74 



I know what it must have cost Jes- 
sica to do this. But I also know that once 
she realized it was right for her to do it, 
she went ahead, unflinchingly. 

The immediate cause of her hair shear- 
ing was her moving picture, in which she 
sings two songs. For years Jessica has 
been vowing that she would make no pic- 
tures. All her time and attention, she 
said, belonged to her radio audience, her 
first love. Besides, she privately admitted, 
she didn't think she was pretty enough for 
pictures. . . . 

After Jessica saw the first rushes of 
her film, she decided to cut her hair, come 
what might. Paramount officials provided 
the impetus. "Why in heaven's name," 
they argued, "don't you cut your hair? 
Every other girl wants to look young. And 
you deliberately make yourself appear 
years older, wearing that lovely hair in a 
bun like an old lady !" 

Tired and discouraged, Jessica went 
home that night. She looked at herself in 
the mirror, fingered her spun-gold hair. 
And her heart was as heavy as the tumul- 
tuous, swelling river, straining to burst its 
dams. 

Rebellion seethed within her. Rebellion 
against the publicity men, who had 
branded her as a tissue-paper doll. Re- 
bellion against her business advisers who 
dared tell the woman, Jessica Dragonette, 
what to do. And before her eyes there 
floated a vision — the vision of what she 
would look like with her hair cut. She 
knew in her heart that the Paramount 
officials were right, that she would look 
years younger. "Let me be a human 
being," she prayed silently. 

And then she exulted in a new freedom. 
No longer would her wings be pinioned. 
Once and forever she cast off the bondage 
of the figure she had outgrown. 

"It took me a whole day to get my hair 
cut," she said. "Nobody wanted to do it. 
I went to my regular hairdresser, and she 
turned me down flat. 

" 'What,' the woman said in horror, 'cut 
off that long mass of lovely hair? You 
must l>e crazy!'" So Jessica went to her 
beauty-parlor. Here again the operator 
was adamant. It wasn't till she visited a 
strange hairdresser that the job finally 
was done. 

With her new hair-cut, shoulder length, 
Jessica looks about sixteen. In fact, she 
looks so enchanting that when the Para- 
mount officials saw the new bob, they 
begged her to make retakes. So the Jes- 
sica you will see in pictures will be the 
girl with bobbed hair. 

And now her full personality, that of 
a "regular" girl, is apparent even to the 
blindest. People are beginning to look at 
her with different eyes. They worshipped 
the Jessica whom they considered an 
angel; but they adore this human Jessica. 

This courageous, altogether real, girl. 
One with faults like you and me. With 
a temper, which she has striven for years 
to control. "My temper," she told me, "is 
worse than the kind that makes you want 
to throw things at people. When I get 
angry I freeze up externally and get all 
choked up inside. I go as far away as 
possible from the person who's angered 
me." 

She doesn't get angry often, and never 
allows herself to get angry before a broad- 
cast. Any violent emotion interferes with 



singing. And her singing must come first. 

But you can always tell when Jessica is 
reaching the boiling point. Her blue eyes 
shoot sparks, "South American looks," 
her friends call them. 

When someone circulates false, or half- 
baked stories about her, it makes her 
furious. Like the time a story was printed 
that she had chased someone out of her 
studio, saying: "I am Jessica Dragonette. 
This is my studio. You're not alloiccd in 
here!" 

The real facts ? Here they are : 

"One day I was sitting in the studio 
before a rehearsal," she told me. "I no- 
ticed a fine-looking gentleman peering in. 
Very evidently looking for someone." 

Jessica smiled. He came forward. "Are 
you the young English lady who is wait- 
ing for me?" he asked. 

"I'm afraid not," Jessica replied. He 
excused himself and went out. 

That's all the writer of the story saw. 
So he used his imagination. 

But he didn't see the gentleman, Cap- 
tain Davis, come back a minute later. 

"Please forgive me," the Captain begged, 
"for not recognizing you. You are Jessica 
Dragonette, who sings over the air. When 
I was laid up in the hospital, I used to 
wait eagerly for your programs." 

Jessica and the Captain began to talk, as 
would any normal girl and man under 
similar circumstances. And it ended with 
Jessica's going to lunch with him ! 

In line with the groping for the true 
Jessica, she has not turned down offers 
for personal appearances this year, as 
heretofore. Within the past year she has 
made more personal appearances than in 
all the other years combined. She even 
appeared before the Sales Convention of 
the Motion Picture executives, and actu- 
ally made a speech ! 

On her last vacation she learned to 
pilot an aquaplane, something that would 
have been forbidden to the Jessica of 
old. One morning Jessica, out at Ventnor, 
New Jersey, got it into her head that she 
wanted to learn to pilot an aquaplane, that 
she'd enjoy the thrill of skimming over 
the bouncing waves. Now the water in 
Ventnor is pretty rough, what with boats 
sailing back and forth. Unless you can 
dive, it's really taking quite a chance to 
go out on one of the planes by yourself. 

Everyone Jessica knew was aghast when 
she said she was going to learn to ride 
one. "Why, you can't even dive," they 
said. "What if your aquaplane should cap- 
size? You must be careful what you do." 

But Jessica was sick of being the 
mustn't .-take-chances star. 

Fearlessly she rode the waves. And then 
the backwash of a passing boat threw her 
off her plane, almost breaking her wrist. 
Her friends stood on shore, wringing their 
hands. Their darling Jessica had been 
hurt! But Jessica just picked herself up, 
twisted her wrist a few times to relieve 
the strain, and hopped back again on the 
plane, laughing as she rode the waves. 

Yet, though you may not believe this, 
Jessica claims nothing has changed about 
her. As for changing her personality, she 
says that's all nonsense — it's just that 
people are beginning to see the true 
Jessica Dragonette. 

Frankly, I think she's wrong — -that she 
has changed more than she herself real- 
izes. What do you think? 

The End 



RADIO STARS 



Dnttoduclnj Mill 
Radio StaU 

(Continued from page 29) 



from the very beginning. At the age of 
five, Neila's pudgy fingers were already 
plucking tunes on the piano. She was go- 
ing to be a concert pianist. Go on the 
stage. Taste the glory and fame that had 
been snatched from her mother. 

When Neila was in the "growing up" 
years, the Goodelles left New York for 
the lure of gold in the Florida land boom. 
Here she met Burton Thatcher, the singer, 
and made a bargain with him to play his 
accompaniments in return for vocal les- 
sons. Through this arrangement she gained 
entree into the Winter mansions of the 
Stotesburys, the Huttons and the Vander- 
bilts, and over the piano tops she cooed 
at the Captains of Industry. One of these 
Captains fell for the cooing and sent her 
to New York with a letter of introduction 
to some theatrical friends. The letter was 
partly responsible for her winning a schol- 
arship to the Berkshire Playhouse, where 
Katharine Hepburn and Alexander Kirk- 
land were among those who were learning 
how to walk gracefully on to a stage. 

"Neila" at the time was Helen Goodelle. 
'Alexander Kirkland thought it sounded 
too kitcheny for an actress," she explains, 
"He said : 'Pronounce Helen backwards 
and spell it to fit,' and there I was ! I even 
had a christening. I was wrapped in a 
huge white sheet like a baby and Alex- 
ander dumped a big pitcher of ice water 
over my head." 

Dripping little Helen became siren Neila, 
and from then on her life managed to fit 
that de luxe name. 

There was that experience in a New 
York cafe, for instance. This was several 
months later, after Neila had been seen 
in the Playhouse by Theresa Helburn of 
the Theater Guild and placed in the Gar- 
rick Gaieties. The season in the Gaieties 
was as much fun as a college prom, but 
since mother was back home Neila went 
her own way and blew her one hundred and 
twenty-five per on the silliest doodads. 
That's why she grabbed the first job 
offered her, even though it was singing 
in a club that you couldn't exactly take 
your visiting Aunt Lydia to. 

About that experience, though — two men 
wanted to take her home and then decided 
to settle the argument by pulling out guns. 
Neila, who gets the jitters at the sight of 
a firecracker, ran screaming from the 
place. The next night occurred the raid 
of the club, accompanied by more guns 
and screams, and Neila found herself 
shoved out in the street, tickled pink to 
have the skin left on her bones. 

Here Iney (pet name for Inez, who is 
Mrs. Goodelle) stepped in and took con- 
trol once more. The master-of-ceremonies 
of that night club got Neila a job singing 
at the Ritz-Carlton in Philadelphia. And 
it was there that Neila was to run smack 
into Heart Throb No. 1— and also into the 
fact that she couldn't take her life and 
live it as she pleased. 

He was the college boy whose dad owned 
a good share of the city. Now that in 



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76 



-itself was enough to turn any girl's head. 
Add to it a perfectly disarming grin, the 
most attentive stare and a long roadster 
which stopped at the best parties in town 
and you have a picture of Neila being 
rushed right off her 4 AAs. She was dizzy 
with happiness the night he gave her his 
fraternity ring. 

But Iney wasn't. "He drinks too much," 
she told Neila. They were having one of 
their "after-midnight" talks in Iney's bed- 
room. Neila laughed, then stormed her 
disagreement. Oh — all right, better to give 
in to Iney's strange request. She'd wait 
a month. Test him. 

For several weeks he was on his best 
behavior, and Neila flipped the fashion 
magazine pages looking at bridal gowns. 
One day she got a hurry call to come to 
New York for a few days. "We'll be 
married when I get back," she promised. 
She was still lovestruck. 

When she did return, he wasn't at the 
station to meet her. He was at the in- 
firmary, she was told. She saw him there, 
in an ugly, drunken stupor. "He's been 
on a continuous tear since you left." Neila 
rushed home to the comforting arms of 
Iney, but not before she first switched 
a jewelled frat pin from her dress into an 
envelope and slipped it under his door. 

Score one for mama. 

That stroke of good judgment made 
Neila the most confirmed "mother's girl." 
Iney advised her about contracts, about her 
diet and what shade of lipstick to smear 
on her lips. And the advice, take it from 
Neila, was good. Otherwise she would 
never have got that chance to take Jane 
Froman's role in the road show of the 
"Follies". Nor would she have met Heart 
Pulser No. Two. 

Iney had warned her about taking the 
job. Oh, strictly business principles. No 
hint of the Love Menace at the time. "The 
show will keep you out of New York for 
about a year, and in that time the man- 
agers here will forget you." But Neila 
thought she saw in this her Big Chance. 

In every city she was dated and feted 
and fussed over. But that all seemed like 
a Sunday-school ripple compared to the 
Big Rush the Movie Star gave her when 
the "Follies" played California. I can't 
reveal his name here, but his flashing grin 
and his six feet of magnetism has caused 
a flurry in every movie house. Night after 
night Neila received his telegrams in her 
dressing-room, but she thought it was a 
joke of one of the boys in the show. Well, 
you could have toppled her over with a 
false eyelash when this star appeared in 
her dressing-room one night — in person — 
with a bunch of velvety orchids in his 
hands. 

The next day there was luncheon with 
him, breezing through Beverly Hills in that 
gleaming silver projectile of a car. Intro- 
ductions to Swanson and Lombard and 
Beery at the Brown Derby. Then to his 
home, where he had a genuine Japanese 
valet and all the movie star trappings. By 
this time Neila's arm was black and blue 
what with her pinching herself so often. 
After the show that night came the Tro- 
cadero club where dinner is something like 
twenty dollars a throw and movie stars 
get in your sherbert. Neila was still in 
Wonderland with a Prince Charming come 
to life. He was so sweet, and just daffy 
enough to make himself completely irre- 
sistible. At the head of the famous wind- 



ing stairs, he lifted her up and ran down 
the steps holding his squirming little 
bundle lightly. "Folks," he announced to 
the gay crowd below, "I want you to meet 
my future wife!" There were lots of 
giggles and congratulations and envious 
stares. 

On the tour back East again, there were 
extravagant telegrams from him. He flew 
to New York to be with her for a few 
days and wanted to take her back to Hol- 
lywood as his bride. Neila's head was 
whirling in the clouds as she rushed into 
Iney's room. 

But it seems that mother had done some 
sleuthing. She learned that the man was 
one of those irresistible philanderers who 
couldn't quite stay true to one woman for 
very long. He had been married before 
— after a furious and hectic courtship like 
this — and the marriage had exploded in 
two months. The girl had been a promis- 
ing actress who had given up the stage 
to be his wife. Today she was doing sec- 
ond-rate roles, buried in obscurity. Neila 
suddenly remembered his, "Give up the 
stage, honey, and be my wife." Was she 
headed for the same fate as his first wife? 
As she and Iney threshed out this problem 
together, she saw him as one who would 
chafe at the bit of domesticity. His pace 
was one dizzy joyride; she wasn't geared 
to his stride. How long could they stay 
together? And after that — what? Just 
another ex-wife accused of trying to trade 
in on her famous ex-husband's name? 
Not on la Goodelle's life, thank you! 

Another one of Iney's prophecies was 
coming true, too. After the road edition 
of "Follies," Neila couldn't get a grip on 
another show. That eight-months' tour 
had been too long to stay away from the 
street that forgets names so quickly. 

It was about this time that Neila got so 
good and mad sitting in the outer offices 
and hearing the familiar, "Come back to- 
morrow," that she decided to get married 
and forget all about the career. 

She looked around for a lifeline and 
found it in the person of a famous lawyer 
in the Middle West. She had met him 
some three years ago while she was sing- 
ing in a hotel there, and he had fallen in 
love with her. He was twenty years older 
than she — well-known, rich, looked up to 
in the community — but he was as com- 
pletely infatuated as a sixteen-year-old 
boy. Promised her everything. "I'll settle 
an estate upon your parents and they'll 
never have to worry." If Iney were a 
daughter-exploiter, she would have seized 
this opportunity. But instead — "He's old- 
er than you and what you feel for him 
is admiration, not love. Then again he 
wants you to leave show business alto- 
gether. To settle down in a small town 
and be his wife. In a month you'll start 
thinking of Broadway and the fame and 
glory you might have had. That's it — 
you'll be a 'might have been'." 

Up to that time Neila, young and im- 
pressionable, had accepted Iney's advice 
complacently. But now, with her career 
in midair, doubts began to assail her. Was 
mother always right? Was a career so 
important ? Wouldn't it be better to have 
the luxury and security of an advantageous 
marriage? 

She learned for herself when the man 
came to New York to see her. It was at 
a party. She was dancing with one of the 
men when he strode toward her, his face 



RADIO STARS 



flushed with anger and too much Bourbon. 
"See here!" Everyone turned around to 
stare. "No wife of mine is ever going to 
look at another man. And no more of this 
show business, either ! You're going to 
live an entirely different life from now 
on." 

So! Neila could see herself cooped up, 
away from everything her young heart 
loved. Her career suddenly became very 
precious to her. 

She crept into the apartment and flew 
into her mother's bedroom. "Iney! Iney!" 
It was a joyful war whoop. "Iney, you 
were right I" 

She plugged down to the business of her 
work in dead earnest now. Men were out 
of the picture for the time being. And 
with Iney to advise, to criticize, to en- 
courage and to manage her, she obtained 
a one-time spot on Al Jolson's Shell Cha- 
teau program. 

"I was so nervous, my knees almost 
buckled under me ! Jolson had to put his 
arm around me to hold me up." 

But nerves or no nerves, it was that 
program which got her the present con- 
tract with Cutex. There's an interesting 
story about this show. Neila was original- 
ly supposed to carry the entertainment part 
of the program, while a society woman 
was to do the announcing. Thev audi- 
tioned this woman, and then let Neila do 
a little prattling herself. After listening 
to both, the sponsor decided to have Neila 
do the announcing, too. "You sound more 
refined," she was told. So, as things stand 
now, Neila will carry the complete pro- 
gram alone, singing, playing the piano and 
announcing. "Unless," she adds, "I slide 
under the piano from mike fright." 

Today Neila is a young woman in her 
early twenties, belonging to the show world 
where girls of her age usually have dis- 
carded one or two husbands, or have ac- 
quired a cynical attitude toward life. 
"Where does she get her old-fashioned 
common sense," asks Broadway of this 
girl who, in spite of her pert face and 
chorusey figure, has certainly not "gone 
Broadway." They don't know that when- 
ever Neila shows signs of ranting off into 
an " I'm-a-star" complex, Mrs. Goodelle 
merely says, "Don't forget you're still 
Methodist Helen Goodelle to me." It al- 
ways works. 

Is Mrs. Goodelle one of these possessive 
stage mamas who is determined to have 
her daughter crowd out love and marriage 
for the sake of the career ? Or is she a 
woman who is weaving a sensible pattern 
of life for daughter — one in which mar- 
riage will take its natural place after the 
first thrill of applause has worn off? 

I found the answer. 

We were all in the Goodelles' modern 
white-and-blue apartment in New York's 
chic Fifties— Neila, Iney and myself. 

"Oh, yes, I intend to get married. 
When ?" The snub nose wrinkled. "In 
about two years, I guess, I'll be ready for 
it." 

"You mean give up your career, after 
all, for marriage?" 

Neila grinned. "Not at all. But in two 
years I'll really know just how my future 
will work out. If I'm a success, then mar- 
riage will be all I need to give me com- 
plete happiness. If I fail — well," a shrug, 
"at least I've had my chance. I'll never 
have to say, 'I might have been'." 
The End 








"ATO. 


O" 





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this particular purpose. It can form 

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And that is all a million women had 

to know to accept this new comfort 

and new freedom. 

Are you a martyr to "regular" pain? 
Must you favor yourself, and save 
yourself, certain days of every month? 
Midol might change all this. Might 
have you your confident self, leading 



HERSELF 
how to live 
get through 
, . the eighth 
uses Midol. 



your regular life, free 
from "regular" pain. 
Even if you didn't receive 
complete relief from every 
bit of pain or discomfort, 
you would be certain of 
a measure of relief well 
worth while! 



Doesn't the number of 
those now using Midol 
mean something? It's the 
knowing women who have that little 
aluminum case tucked in their purse. 
Midol is taken any time, preferably 
before the time of the expected pain. 
This precaution often avoids the pain 
altogether. But Midol is effective even 
when the pain has caught you un- 
aware and has reached its height. It's 
effective for hours, so two tablets 
should see you through your worst day. 
Get these tablets in any drug store — 
they're usually right out on the toilet 
goods counter. Or you may try them 
free! A card addressed to Midol, 170 
Varick St., New York, will bring a 
plainly wrapped trial box. 

77 



RADIO STARS 





THIS 

TIMELY HEALTH HINT 

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published by the firm that has been scien- 
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Full of information the dog owner should 
have if he wishes to keep his dog healthy. 
Just send us your name. The book will be 
sent at once. FREE. Postpaid, It may easily 
save your dog's life. Write for it NOW. 

Our own veterinarian will gladly advise you 
about your dog's health. Write fully stating 
all symptoms and the age, breed and sex of 
your dog. There is no charge. 

For Free Book or Advice Address '. 
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1968 W. Broad St., Richmond, Va. 

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Name 



Street 

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Mh± 4jey A/onny Manny -tfttiVed 



(Continued from page 35) 



She just walked up to the secretary of 
George Junkins, director of station 
KMOX, and said in her haughtiest man- 
ner. "You'd better tell Mr. Junkins Miss 
Thompson is here, and I haven't much 
time to give him." 

Mr. Junkins, amazed, consented to see 
her. She was ushered in. "Oh, hello 
George Junkins," she said brightly. 

Flabbergasted, Mr. Junkins stared at 
her. "Heavens know who she is," he 
thought. "She must have slipped my mem- 
ory. She seems to know me, well enough." 

Then she explained what she wanted. 

"So you think you can sing," Mr. Jun- 
kins said weakly. 

"I know I can sing." 

"Go ahead." 

She sang Rocking Chair. "You sound 
a little like Libby Holman," he said. "All 
right, we'll take you on at twenty-five dol- 
lars a week." 

Any other girl would have been tickled. 
Not Kay. "That's not enough," she said. 
"Look how much Libby gets and you said 
I sound just like her." 

"Keep still or I'll make it twenty dol- 
lars," he countered. 

"Go ahead," said Miss Thompson, as 
sassy and fresh as they come. "I'D be 
making more than you will, some day." 

On the air went Kay three times a week. 
"What, they pay you for making those 
noises that drove us crazy?" her father 
said. "Something is wrong somewhere." 

In the middle of one of her first broad- 
casts, something happened. Now a micro- 
phone (particularly the old style one they 
used) is a precious, fragile, expensive 
thing. And at the slightest touch mikes 
have been know'n to break and fall apart. 
Artists are always warned never to handle 
them. They are sacred to the fingers of 
the engineers alone. 

But little Kay knew nothing of this. 
One night the mike was too high. She 
was in a hurry. She saw the screw that 
did the job. And bango, the mike had 
toppled over, and lay at her feet, in a 
hundred pieces. Kay kept on singing. 

The studio officials were wild. "That 
mike cost us three hundred dollars," they 
said. "How did you ever dare touch it? 
You'll have to pay for it." 

"Pay you three hundred dollars?" she 
hooted. "Don't be silly. You can't draw 
blood from a turnip." 

She never did pay, either, and she kept 
right on singing till she was fired from 
her first commercial. 

Then her father insisted she enter 
Washington University in St. Louis. He 
thought it might keep her out of mischief, 
enable him to keep an eye on his efferves- 
cent daughter, since she had to live at 
home. But he didn't know his darling 
little Kay. She cut classes right and left, 
on the principle that it was a mistake to 
allow learning to interfere with pleasure. 

One term her family insisted she take 
Greek. Her sister Blanche had passed it 
with flying colors. Kay took it, cutting 
classes three quarters of the time. 

When the day for the exam arrived, 



Kay was at a loss for once. The only 
words she recognized on the exam were 
the verb for to march, and her sorority 
letters. For ten minutes she sat and 
thought. Then she wrote on her paper: 
"Dear Mr. Durfy: (he was the instructor) 
"I am sorry I will not be able to an- 
swer these questions today. Mother has 
been ill and I haven't been able to con- 
centrate. This is no reflection upon your 
teaching." 

After handing in her paper she walked 
out, every one of the suffering studes gap- 
ing at the proficiency with which she had 
completed a three-hour exam in ten min- 
utes. 

Mr. Durfy insisted, under the circum- 
stances, that she take a reexam. They set 
the date for the end of the summer vaca- 
tion. By that time Blanche had coached 
her sufficiently for her to get by. "My 
days," Kay told me, "as a Greek student 
though, were over." 

The next year Kay decided to go to 
California, the land of sunshine, movie 
sheiks, and romance, where one could 
dance and swim and golf to one's heart's 
content. Unfortunately, dad refused to 
finance the trip. That didn't phase Kay. 

"I got a copy of Harper's Bazaar," she 
said, "and picked out all the ritzy western 
girl's camps as my prey. I sat down and 
wrote them all the same masterpiece, ask- 
ing for a job as counsellor." 

She said modestly that she was terribly 
efficient in swimming, diving, music, danc- 
ing, could be head of campfire, that she 
was a college graduate, and felt if they 
took her they'd be getting something 
worth while. And she landed a job at a 
camp on the Catalina Islands, at $175 for 
the season. 

At the end of the summer, she refused to 
go back to St. Louis. With that $175 
tucked away she would conquer the world 
— of radio, anyway. She was all set for 
big time. It was easy, or so she thought. 

At the very beginning, it seemed she 
was right. She went up to see Glenn Doi- 
berg, in charge of programs at station 
KFI. He promised her a job singing. 

A month later, when she came back in 
her very best bib and tucker, and the job 
was supposed to be ready, Dolberg said he 
couldn't remember her, didn't remember 
any such promise. 

It's the thing that's puzzled Kay ever 
since. Why did he do it ? I think I 
know. I think he was an exceedingly 
wise man. When he met this cocky, bom- 
bastic, personable young lady, he recog- 
nized the tine talent in her voice. But, 
very evidently, she needed discipline, or 
she would ruin her career. 

So he made his plans to do something 
about it. He taught her a lesson, once and 
for all. • He took lrer down a peg or two. 

Now it seemed her luck had turned for 
the worse. For three months she hunted 
a singing job, and couldn't get one. It 
got so the only time she was sure of a 
decent meal was when one of the local 
sheiks took her out. Since her dad and 
mother kept begging this headstrong 



78 



RADIO STARS 



daughter to come back to the fold, she 
couldn't very well write asking them for 
cash to stay in California. You know how 
it is with a girl, if you've ever been away 
from home, and broke. You hate to ask 
for help because you've proudly struck 
forth on your own. 

At a party she met the daughter of the 
president of the Union Gas Company. In 
spite of the fact that she was down in the 
dumps and worried, she didn't let anyone 
in on her troubles. She kidded around, 
and sang and played for the guests, as 
though she were on top of the world. 

Why did she act like a Big Shot? Here 
were people of importance in the social 
world, people in contact with men who 
hired girls to sing for them on the radio. 
Have you ever felt like getting into a cor- 
ner and hiding, and instead had to put on 
a big front? Then you know how Kay 
felt. 

She let it be known she was at liberty, 
and the world's best radio singer. She 
got the job singing for the Union Gas 
Company on the air, at ninety dollars a 
week. 

One day, just before a broadcast, came 
a wire from her mother : Father Ter- 
ribly III Come Home At Once. 

"I stayed for the whole broadcast," Kay 
told me. "I couldn't walk out on them." 
Throughout the entire program she cried, 
and she was sensational ! 

Back home she found the report of her 
dad's illness exaggerated. Her father, who 
had angina pectoris, was as well as could 
be expected, and walking around. It was 
just a ruse to get their wandering daughter 
back to home and mother. Kay arrived on 
Thursday. On Friday she did nothing. 
On Saturday she did nothing. Saturday 
night she almost went wild from restless- 
ness. 

The old boy friend of the deathride, 
Jimmie, hearing this sweet little minx was 
back in town, took her out stepping. They 
went dancing at the Coronado Hotel. Kay, 
ever on the lookout for opportunity, no- 
ticed that Al Lyons' band, which played 
at the hotel, had no vocalist. 

"Wonderful music, isn't it?" asked 
Jimmie. 

"Yes," she answered, but her mind said, 
"Gee, I wonder if I could sing for that 
band leader." 

"Do you want anything to drink?" he 
asked. 

"No, thanks, not till later," she said. 
And her mind was saying, "How in the 
world can I meet Al Lyons?" 

"Say, you're not very talkative tonight, 
baby," Jimmie said. 

Kay leaned forward suddenly. "Say, 
wangle me an introduction to that band 
leader, like a good boy." There it was, 
out in the open. Before long, Lyons was 
at their table, taking a drink. 

"I'm surprised, Mr. Lyons," Kay said, 
"that as swell a band as yours should have 
no vocalist." Lyons looked doubtful. 

"In Los Angeles," she continued, "it's 
all the rage now. And I know just the 
girl for you. She's good looking, can sing 
like nobody's business, and has oodles of 
personality besides." 

"Bring her around," Al countered. "I'd 
like to meet her. Make it Monday after- 
noon." Next Monday afternoon Kay got 
into the car and drove down to see Al. He 
looked up in astonishment as she ap- 
(Continued on page 81) 





illions use Medicated Cream 
to Promote Rapid Healing 

. , .to relieve irritation and reduce pores 



YOU can dress smartly— you can have 
lovely features— but if your skin is marred 
by Large Pores, Blackheads or Pimples, much 
of your charm is lost. 

Today, millions of women use a famous 
medicated cream as an aid to quick healing 
—to improve their complexion by eliminat- 
ing blackheads and reducing enlarged pores. 
That cream is Noxzema Skin Cream. 

Prescribed by Doctors 

Noxzema was first prescribed by doctors to 



Wonderful for 
Chapped Hands, too 




Relieve them overnight 
with this famous cream 

12,000,000 jars sold yearly 

Make this convincing overnight test. Apply 
Noxzema on one hand tonight. In the morning 
note how soothed it feels — how much soft- 
er, smoother, whiter that hand is! Noxzema 
. relieves hands overnight. 



relieve itching Eczema, and for Burns, Scalds, 
Chafing and other skin irritations. Today 
over 12,000,000 jars are used throughout the 
United States, in Canada and other countries! 

If your skin is Rough and Chapped— if you 
have Large Pores or Blackheads— if you have 
Pimples resulting from dust, face powder 
or other external causes— then by all means 
get a small inexpensive jar of Noxzema. Use 
it and see how wonderful it is. 

Noxzema is not a salve— but a dainty, 
snow-white, medicated vanishing cream. It's 
so soothing, clean and easy to use. 

HOW TO USE: Apply Noxzema every 
night after all make-up has been removed. 
Wash off in the morning with warm water, 
followed by cold water or ice. Apply a little 
Noxzema again before 
you powder as a pro- 
tective powder base. 
Use Noxzema until 
skin condition is en- 
tirely relieved. 




SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER 

Noxzema is sold at almost all drug and 
department stoies. If your dealer can't 
supply you, send only 13/ for a generous 
25/ ttial jar— enough to bring real comfort 
and a big improvement in your skin. Send 
name and address to Noxzema Chemical 
Company, Dept. 511, Baltimore, Md. 



79 



RADIO STARS 



Amazing New 2 -Minute 

OATMEAL FACIAL 

FOR ROUGH-DRYNESS 
BLACKHEADS, OILY SKIN 
COARSE PORES ! 


4 BLEND a little ■ 

X Lavena with 

water. flN*. 

*> APPLY to face. jflj 
£ Wash off. Takes M 
2 minutes. 

O NOW! Skin is 

O radiant, vital! Wk 

Velvety and 

fresh ! I 


. . ,, — 

■ 



• Of course you can't look your best with 
blackheads and rough, dry skin ! Why not try 
this simple 2-minute oatmeal facial? 

It's a miracle ! It deep-cleans. Exercises your 
lazy skin. Soothes, softens and protects it. 
And best of all, unlike soap, Lavena can't irri- 
tate dry, tender skins. It contains no grease to 
make pores cloggy and oily! 

This test will amaze you 

To prove Lavena's superiority, first cleanse 
your face with soap. Then with cold cream. 
Then try the 2-minute Lavena facial. You'll find 
your complexion looks far clearer, cleaner. 

Get a package of Lavena, the amazing oat- 
meal facial, today. In either 10c or 60c size. 

We guarantee to refund the 
price of Lavena if it does not 
perform exactly as we say. 



LAVENA 

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KEEP YOUR HANDS 
FREE OF "CHAP 



Use Hess Witch Hazel Cream— a 
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the skin. Keeps your skin soft as 
velvet. Sold In all 10c stores. 
THE E. E. HESS CO., Brook, Ind 




1RRESISTIBI 



X. .1 1°* T f *-f Vo» M »» *° 



(Continued from page 56) 



8:00 EST (1) — Major Bowes' Amateur Hour. 
(Standard Brands, Inc.) 

WEAF WTAR WBZ WBZA WTIC WTAG 
WTAM WBEN WCAE WIOD WFLA WWJ 
WLW CFCF WWNC WIS CRCT WFBR 
WRC WGY WPTF WJAR WCSH WRVA 
WJAX. 7:00 CST — KTHS WAPI WSB 
WMAQ WSM WTMJ KFYR WOAI WOW 
WMC WJDX KSD WHO WDAF KPRC 
WKY KSTP WEBC WDAT KVOO WFAA 
WSMB WAVE. 6:00 MST — KTAR KDTL 
KOA. 5:00 PST — KFI KGW KPO KOMO 
KHQ. 

8:30 EST (Ms) — Gulf Headlinerg with James 
Melton, tenor; Revelers Quartet; Hallie 
Stiles, soprano; Pickens Sisters and Frank 
Tours Orchestra. 

WABC WJSV WWVA WGR WBDJ WTOC 
WMBR WOKO WSMK WDNC WSJS 
WESG WICC WHP WADC WBIG WBT 
WKBN WBNS WCAO WCAU WHEC 
WJAS WKRC WMAS WNAC WORC 
WSPD WDAE WDBO WDRC WEAN 
WFBL WFEA WHK WLBZ WQAM 
CKLW. 7:30 CST — WCOA KLRA KRLD 
KTRH WALA WSBT KWKH WNOX 
WFBM KTSA WACO WBRC WDOD 
WDSTJ WGST WHAS WLAC WREC WSFA 
WOWO. 

9:00 EST (1) — Ford Sunday Evening: Hour. 
WABC and network. 

9:00 EST (VS>) — Manhattan Merry-Go-Round. 
Rachel Car la > , blues singer; Pierre Le 
Kreeun, tenor; Jerome Mann, imperson- 
ator; Andy Sannella's Orchestra; Men 
About Town trio. (Sterling: Products, Inc.) 
WEAF WTIC WJAR WTAM WHIO WTAG 
WCAE WBEN WCSH WFBR WRC WGY 
WWJ WSAI CFCF KYW. 8:00 CST — 
KFYR WMAQ KSD WHO WOW WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC WDAF. 7:00 MST — KOA 
KDYL. 6:00 PST— KHQ KPO KFI KGW 
KOMO. 

9:00 EST (M») — Silken Strings Program. 
Charles Previn and his orchestra. (Real 
Silk Hosiery.) 

WJZ WBAL WMAL WBZ WJR WFIL 
WBZA WSYR WHAM KDKA WGAR 
WLW WENR KSO KWK. 8:00 CST — 
WREN KOIL WMT. 
8:30 EST (%)— Walter Wincheli. (Jergen's 
Lotion.) 

WJZ WBZ WMAL WJR WLW WBZA 
WBAL WSYR WHAM KDKA WGAR 
WENR KSO KWK WREN KOIL WMT. 
9:30 EST (%) — American Album of Familiar 
Music. Frank Munn, tenor; Vivienne 
Segal, soprano; BertrHnd Hlrscn, violinist; 
Haeiischen Concert Orchestra. (Sterling 
Products, Inc.) 

WEAF WTAG WEEI WJAR WPTF WCSH 
WFBR WWNC WRC WGY WBEN WCAE 
WTAM WWJ WSAI WIOD WFLA WRVA 
KYW WHIO WJAX CFCF CRCT WIS 
8:30 CST— WSB WMAQ WHO KSD WSM 
WOW WMC WOAI WJDX WFAA WSMB 
KPRC WDAF WTMJ KSTP. 7:30 MST— 
KDYL KOA. 6:30 PST— KFI KGW KOMO 
KHQ KPO. 

t:45 EST (M0 — Neila Goodelle. (Northern 
Wnrren Corp.) 

WJZ and basic blue network. 

10:00 EST (Mt) — Wayne King. (Lady Esther.) 
WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WAAH 
WKBW WKRC WHK WBNS CKLW 
WDRC WCAU WJAS WFBL WSPD WJSV. 
9:00 CST — WFBM KMOX WBBM KM BP 
WHAS WDSU WCCO KRLD WIBW 
KFAB. 8:00 MST — KSL KLZ. 7:00 PST 
— KERN KM.I KOIN KHJ KFBK KGB 
KFRC KDB KOL KFPY KWG KVI. 

11:00 EST (MO — Sunset Dreams — Morin Sisters 
and the Ranch Boys. 

10:00 CST — WOAI KTHS WDAF WKY 
KPRC WHAT K TBS. 9:00 MST— KOA 
KDYL. 8:00 PST— KPO KK1 KGW KOMO 
KHQ KFSD KTAR. 
11:15 EST (%)— Walter Wincheli. The Jergens 
Program. 

9:15 MST — KOA KDYL KGIR KGHL KPO 

KFI KGW KOMO KHQ KFSD KTAR. 
11:30 EST (M0 — Jack Benny. (General Foods.) 

WJZ and network. 
12:00 EST (Ms) — The Silken Strings Program. 

Charles Previn and bis orchestra. 

10:00 MST— KOA KDYL. 9:00 PST— KPO 

KFI KGW KOMO KHQ. 

MONDAY 



(Oct. 



;th. 



Ilth. 2 1st a lid ''Hth) 



6:45 EST <M0 — Lowell Thomas gives the 
dav's news. (Sun Oil.) 

WJZ WLW CRCT WBAL WBZ KDKA 
WHAM WJR WSYR WBZA WJAX WFLA 
WMAL WGAR WRVA WIOD. 

7:00 EST (M) — Amos 'n' Andy. (Pepsodent.) 
WEAF and network. 
(See also 11:00 P.M. EST.) 

7:00 EST (Vi) — "Just Entertainment. " Vari- 
ety Program. (Wm. Wrlgley, Jr., Co.) 
WABC network. 

1il5 EST (M0 — Tony nnd tins — dramatic 
sketch with Mario Ohamlee and George 

Frame Brown. (General Foods Corp.) 

WJZ WBAL WMAL WBZ WBZA WSYR 



WHAM KDKA WCKY WFIL WPTF WIS 
WWNC WJAX WIOD WFLA WSOC 
WTAR WGAR. 6:15 CST — WENR. 

7:15 EST (M0 — "Uncle Ezra's Radio Station 
E-Z-R-A." (Dr. Miles Laboratories.) 
WEAF WJAR WTAG WEEI WBEN 
WCAE WRC WCSH WGY WTAM KYW 
WHIO WFBR WLW. 6:15 CST — WHO 
WOW WDAF WMAQ. 

7:30 EST (M0 — turn and Abner — comedy 
sketch ■ 

NBC Service Chicago Studios to WJZ 
WBZ WBZA WSYR WENR. 
7:45 EST (M0 — Dangerous Paradise with 
Elsie Hitz and Nick Dawson. (Wood- 
bury's.) 

WJZ WLW WBAL WMAL W T FIL WBZ 
WBZA WSYR WHAM KDKA. 6:45 CST— 
WENR KTBS KWK KSO KOIL WREN 
WSM WSB WSMB WBAP. 
7:45 EST (M0 — Boake Carter, commentator 
on the news. (Philco Radio and Television 
Corp.) 

WABC WCAO WNAC WDRC WEAN 
WFBL. WKRC WJSV WHK CKLW 
WCAU WJAS WBT WGR. 6:45 CST— 
KMBC WBBM WHAS KMOX KRLD 
KOMA WCCO. 

8:00 EST (MO — Hammerstein's Music Hall. 
(American Home Products.) 
WEAF and basic red network. 

8:00 EST (Ms) — Fibber McGee and Molly- 
comedy sketch with Marion and Jim Jor- 
dan; Lynn Martin, contralto; mixed sex- 
tette; Dlderico Marcelii's orchestra. 
NBC Service Chicago Studios to WZJ 
WGAR WFIL WBAL WMAL WBZ 
WBZA WHAM KDKA WCKY. 7:00 ( ST 
— WLS WMT KSO KOIL WREN. 6:00 
MST — KOA KDYL. 5:00 PST — KFI KGW 
KOMO KHQ KPO WSYR. 

8:00 EST (Mt) — Esso Marketers present Lom- 
bardo Road. (Standard Oil Co. of N. J.) 
WABC WOKO WCAO WNAC WGR 
WMBG WDBJ WHEC WICC WDRC 
WCAU WJAS WEAN WFBL WJSV WPG 
WBT WDNC WBIG WHP. 7:00 CST— 
WDOD WNOX KLRA WREC WHBF 
WLAC WDSU KWKH WIBX WWVA 
WSJS WORC WCHS WESG WCSC. 

8:30 EST (Ms) — Firestone Concert; Margaret 
Speaks, soprano; Wm, Daly's orchestra. 
(Firestone Tire Rubber Co.) 
WEAF WTIC WTAG WEEI WRVA 
WJAR WCSH WFBR WRC WHIO WGY 
WBEN WTAM WWJ WLW WCAE CRCT 
CFCF WPTF WWNC WIS WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WSOC WTAR. 7:30 CST— WMAQ 
WHO WPRC KSD WEBC WTMJ WIBA 
KFYR WSM WMC WSB WJDX WSMB 
WAVE WKY KTBS WOAI KYW WDAF 
WDAY KSTP WOW WIRE WFAA WAPI 
KTHS. 

8:30 EST (M) — Evening in Paris — Odette 
Myrtil, the Pickens Sisters. Mark Warnow 
and on best. (Bourjois Sales Corp.) 

WJZ and network. 
8:30 EST (MO — One Night Stand with Pick 
and Pat ; Joseph Bonime orchestra. (Dill's 
Best and Model Smoking Tobacco.) 

WABC WNAC WADC WOKO WCAO 
WGR WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD WJSV WLBZ 
WICC WBT WHP WMBG WHEC WMAS 
WORC. 7:30 CST — WBBM, KFAB WOWO. 
Repeat 11:30 EST on KRNT WFBM WHAS 
KMOX KERN KM.I KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB KOL KFPY KWG KVI 
KLZ KSL. 

9:00 EST (Mt) — A * P Gypsies Orchestra, di- 
rection Harry Horlick. Guest stars. 
WEAF WTIC WTAG WEEI KYW WHIO 
WRC WJAR WCAE WCSH WWJ WOT 
WBEN WTAM. 8:00 CST— KSD WOW 
WDAF WHO WMAQ WSAI WIRE. 

9:00 EST (D— Lux Radio Theater. 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WNAC 
WKBW WKRC WHK WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WFBL WSPD WJSV WQAM 
WDAE WICC WBT WBNS CKAC WDBJ 
WHEC CFRB WORC CKLW WDRC. 8:00 
CST— WBBM KRNT WFBM KMBC WHAS 
KFAB KMOX WGST WBRC KRLD KLRH 
KLRA WREC WISN WCCO WLAC WDSU 
KOMA KTSA WNAX 7:00 MST — KLZ 
KSL. 6:00 PST — KHJ KOIN KGB KFRC 
KOL KFPY KVI KERN KM J KFBK KDB 
KWG. 

9:00 EST (Mt) — Sinclair Greater Minstrels; 
old time minstrel show. 

WJZ WGAR WWNC WSYR WRVA WAPI 
KTHS WJR WMAL WTAR WLW WIS 
WJAX WIOD WFLA WBAL WBZ WBZA 
KDKA WSOC WPTF. 8:00 CST— WSB 
WLS KWK WREN KSO KVOO KSTP 
WEBC WDAY KPRC KTBS KOIL KFYR 
WTMJ WFAA WMC WSMB WJDX WOAI 
WKY WMT WIBA WSM. 7:00 MST— 
KOA KDYL. 
9:30 EST (Mi) — Princess Pal Player*. Dra- 
matic sketch. 

WJZ WBAL WSYR WJR WMAL WFIL 
WBZ WBZA WHAM KDKA WGAR 
WENR WCKY. 8:30 CST— KSO KWK 
WREN KOIL WMT 
9:30 EST (Mi) — Grace Moore (Vlck Chem. Co.) 
WEAF and basic red network. 
10:00 EST (Mt) — Wayne King's orchestra. 
(Lady Esther.) 

(Continued on page S2) 



RO 



RADIO STARS 



NEW FIGURES FOR OLD 
QUICK, SAY THOUSANDS 




GAINS OF 10 TO 25 POUNDS IN A FEW 
WEEKS REPORTED BY USERS 



(Continued from page 79) 
proached alone. "Where's your girl 
friend?" he demanded. 

"I'm the gal," she admitted. 

"For heaven's sake," he gulped. He 
eyed her up and down. Then, "Since 
you're here already, you might as well 
sing." She got the job. 

A few weeks later came a wire from 
California, offering her a job singing on 
the Bing Crosby program! She thought 
she was made. But at the end of her thir- 
teen- weeks' engagement, she found she 
hadn't made as big a splash in the pond 
as she thought; in fact, some people 
seemed to think it was just a tiny eddy. 
So she thought of coming to New York. 

Now you know and I know New York 
has many big programs, much bigger than 
the West Coast can offer. But would any 
have a place for Kay Thompson? 

She didn't know. But she looked into 
her past. Why, she had never got any- 
where by hesitating. She took her nerve 
in both hands and made the jump, persuad- 
ing both her sisters, who were students, 
to come along. 

"Fred Waring's program was one of 
the best," Kay told me. "And nothing but 
the best for Thompson was my slogan." 
She walked in on Fred just as he was 
leaving on a six-weeks' tour last No- 
vember. 

The only thing Fred needed was a 
chorus of sixteen girls, a glee club. The 
girls were to be pretty, refined, and to 
have untrained voices. Now Kay didn't 
know a soul in New York. But do you 
imagine that she let that stop her? "I'll 
get you them," she promised. "When 
you come back we'll be ready for you." 

Then the fun began. Where to dig out 
sixteen sweet, pretty, refined girls? Two 
of them she picked out of the Capitol 
Theatre chorus ; a trio came from the 
Roosevelt Hotel. She got hold of a girl 
at a song plugger's. She went to Macy's, 
began talking to one of the salesgirls, told 
her to sing right then and there and said, 
"You're hired." When she got all through 
she discovered that she had only fourteen 
girls with really fine voices. She came 
home that night and said to her sisters, 
"Kids, you've got a chance to get on the 
air with me." And she slipped them in. 

Some of the girls couldn't read music, 
some had never sung jazz. Some were a 
little dubious, now they had thrown their 
jobs away on the chance of pleasing War- 
ing. But Kay kept up their morale. 

They practiced from noon till one 
o'clock every night, every day, just on the 
chance Waring would take them. Kay 
prepared two arrangements, Wistful and 
Blue, and / Got Rhythm. And if you 
think preparing arrangements for a non- 
descript group of sixteen isn't work, try 
it sometime. Waring came back, heard 
them, and hired them on the spot. They 
went on the air December 29th, as Kay 
Thompson and Her Girls. 

And that was the beginning of Kay 
Thompson's exciting career in New York. 
From her work with Fred Waring's or- 
chestra, she went to the Lucky Strike Hit 
Parade, where she sings and handles all 
the choral work. 

What the future holds for Kay, I don't 
know. But if you ask her, she's confident. 
"It's something mighty close to the top," 
she told me. 

The End 



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81 



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WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WCAU WEAN WSPD WBNS WKBW 
WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC AVJAS WFBL 
WJSV. 9:00 CST — WBBM KMBC WHAS 
KMOX KFAB WCCO WIBW WDSU 
KRLD WFBM. 8:00 MST — KLZ KSL. 
7:00 PST — KERN KM J KHJ KOIN KGB 
KFRC KOL KFPT KVI KFBK KDB 
KWG. 

10:00 EST (Vi) — Contented Program. Lullaby 
Lady; male quartet; Morgan I.. Eastman 
orchestra; Jean Paul King, announcer. 
(Carnation Co.) 

WEAF WTAG WEEI WJAR WSAI WRVA 
WPTF WWNC WIS WJAX WIOD WFLA 
WTAR WCSH WCAE WFBR WRC WTIC 
WGY WBEN WTAM WW J KYW. 9:00 
CST — WMAQ, KSD WHO WOW WDAF 
WFAA. 8:00 MST— KOA KDTL. 7:00 
PST — KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ. 
10:30 EST (Vi) — The March of Time. Drama- 
tizations. 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WNAC 
WCAU WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WKBW WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC. 
9:30 CST — WBBM KRNT WGST KRLD 
WCCO WDSU WFBM KMBC WHAS 
KFAB KMOX WISV. 8:30 MST— KLZ 
KSL. 7:30 PST — KERN KM J KHJ KOIN 
KFBK KGB KFRC KDB KOL KFPT 
KWG KVI. 

11:15 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus — dramatic 
sketch with Mario Chamlee and George 
Frame Brown. (General Foods Corp.) 

WMT KSO WREN KOIL WIRE WTM.T 
WIBA KSTP. WEBC WDAY KFYR WSM 
WMC WSB WJDX WSMB KTHS KTBS 
WAVE KOA KDYL KGIR KGHL KPO 
KFI KGW KOMO KHQ KFSD KTAR 
KWK WAPI WFAA WJR. 

11:30 EST (Vi) — Voice of Firestone Concerts. 
KOA KTAR KDYL KGIR KGHL KFSD 
KFI KGW KPO KHO KOMO KGU. (See 
also 8:30 P.M. EST.) 

11:30 EST (Vi) — One Night Stands with Tick 
and Pat. (Dill's Best and Model Smoking 
Tobaccos.) 

KRNT WFBM WHAS KMOX KERN KM J 
KHJ KOIN KFBK KGB KFRC KDB KOL 
KFPY KWG KVI KLZ KSL KSCJ, WCCO. 

TUESDAYS 

(Oil, l-t, Sth. loth, .'.'nil and 2!ith) 

6:45 EST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. News. 

WJZ WBZ WBZA WJR WBAL KDKA 
WLW WSYR CRCT WMAL WHAM 
WGAR. 

7:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 

(For stations see Monday. See also 11:00 

P.M. EST.) 
7:15 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

See Monday same time for stations. 
7:30 EST (Vi) — Singin' Sam. (Barbasol.) 

WABC WCAO WNAC WDRC WEAN 

WJSV WADC WOKO WKBW CKLW 

WHK WJAS WFBL WSPD. 0:30 CST — 

WOWO. 

7:30 EST (Vi) — Lum and Abner. 

(See Monday for stations.) 
7:45 EST (Vi) — Boake Carter. News. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 
7:45 EST (Vi) — Kate Smith (Atlantic and 

Pacific.) 

WABC and network. 

7:45 EST (Vi) — You and Your Government, 
WEAF and network. 

8:00 EST (Vst) — Lavender and Old Lace, with 
Frank Munn, Tenor; Bernice Claire, So- 
prano, and Gustav Huenschen's orchestra. 
(Sterling Products. Inc. — Bayers Aspirin.) 
WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WEAN 
WFBL WSPD WJSV WKRC WHK CKIAV 
WDRC WNAC WCAU WJAS WGR. 7:00 
CST — KMBC WHAS KMOX WBBM KRNT 
KFAB WFBM. 

8:00 EST (Vi) — Leo Reisman's orchestra with 
Phil Duey and Johnny. (Philip Morris & 
Co.) 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WBEN WCSH 
WPTF WWNC WIS WJAX WIOD WFLA 
W S O C WTAR WCAE KYW WEEI 
WJAR WRC WTAM WTIC WGY. WWJ, 
7:00 CST— WHO WDAF WMAQ KSD 
WOW. 

(See also 11:30 P.M. EST.) 
8:00 EST (Vi) — Eno Crime Clues. Mystery 

drama. (Harold S. Ritchie & Co.) 

WJZ network. 
8:30 EST (Vi) — Packard Presents Lawrence 

Tibbett. 

WAHC WADC WFBL WSPD WJSV 
WMBR WQAM AVDBO WDAE WOKO 
WCAO WNAC WS.IS WHIG CKAC WMBG 
WDB.I AVTOC CKHH WCAU WJAS WE A N 
WBT WBNS WDNC WKHW WKRC WHK 
CKLW WDRC. 7:30 CST— WHHM KRNT 
WFBM KMBC WHAS KFAB WGST 
WDRC AVDOB KRLD WOC KTRH WNOX 
KLKA WREC W1SN WCCO WALA WSFA 
WLAC WDSU KOMA WCOA KTSA 
KWKH KSCJ WIBW K TIT L WACO KFH 
KGKO WNAX. 6:30 MST— KVOR KLZ 
KSL. 5:30 PST — KHJ KOIN KGB KFRC 
KOI, KFPY KVI KFBR KM J KWG KERN 
Klin KOH. 

8:30 KST (Vi) — Edgar A. Guest, in Welcome 
Valley with Hernadine Flynn. Don Briggs 
and Sidney Ellstrom; Joseph Gulllcchio's 
orchestra. (Household Finance Corp.) 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WBZA WF1L WJR 



WLW WMAL WGAR WBAL KDKA 
WSYR. 7:30 CST — WREN KOIL KSO 
KWK WMT WLS. 

8:30 EST (Vi) — Lady Esther Serenade and 
Wayne King's dance music. 
WEAF WCAE WBEN WRC WSAI KYW 
AVGY WCSH WTAM WTIC WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WWJ. 7:30 CST — WTMJ KSD 
WOW WHO WIBA WJDX WDAY WAVE 
KTBS KFYR WKY WDAF WSMB KPRC 
WMC KVOO KSTP WMAQ WOAI WSB 
WIRE WFAA. 

9:00 EST (Vi) — On the Air with Lud Gluskin. 
WABC and network. 

9:00 EST (Vi) — Ben Bernie and his Blue Rib- 
bon orchestra. (Pabst.) 

WEAF WTAG AVJAR WGY WSAI WBEN 

WTAM WCAE WWJ WTIC WEEI WCSH 

WFBR WRC KYW. 8:00 CST — WOW 

KSD WMAQ WHO. 

(See also 12:00 Midnight EST.) 
9:30 EST (Vi) — Helen Hayes (General Foods). 

WJZ and network. 
9:30 EST (1) — Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians 

and Col. Stoopnagle & Budd. (Ford Motor 

Co. Dealers.) 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WHP 
WFEA CKAC WDBJ WHEC WTOC 
WMAS WICC WBT WBNS WSMK WDNC 
WBIG WMBR WQAM WDBO WDAE 
CFRB WLBZ WIBX WCAU WJAS WEAN 
AVFBL WSPD AVJSV WORC WKBN 
WNAC WKBW WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WSJS. 8:30 CST — WBBM WGST 
WBRC WDOD KRLD WOC WOWO KTRH 
KLRA WREC WCCO WALA AVSFA 
WLAC AVDSU KOMA WCOA WMBD 
KTSA KWKH KSCT AVSBT AVIBW KTUL 
AA'ACO KFH KGKO WOWO KTRH WFBM 
KMBC KFAB WHAS KMOX WXBF 
AVKBH. 7:30 MST — KVOR KLZ KSL. 
6:30 PST — KERN KMJ KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB KOL KFPY KWG KVI 
WBT KNOX KOH. 
9:30 EST (Vi) — Eddie Duchin and his Fire 
Chief orchestra. (Texas Co.) 
WEAF AVTAG WJAR AVGY WEEI KYW 
AVHIO WJAX AA"IOD AA r FI.A WLW WTAR 
WTAM WRVA AVIS AVTIC AVCSH WBEN 
WAVJ AA'PTF AVSOC AVFBR AA'RC WCAE 
AVWNC. 8:30 CST — WIRE WEBC WAVE 
AVMAQ KSD AA'MC AVSM AVHO AA'OW 
WDAF AVSB WSMB AVKY AA'BAP KTBS 
WTMJ AVIBA KSTP WDAY KFYR AVJDX 
KVOO AA T OAI KPRC. 7:30 MST — KOA 
KDYL KGIR KGHL KTAR. 6:30 PST— 
KPO KFI KGAV KOMO KHQ. 

10:00 EST (Vi) — Sigmund Romberg, musical 
director; Deems Taylor, narrator and guest 
artists. (Swift & Co.) 
WEAF and basic network. 

10:30 EST (Vi)— The March of Time. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

11:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 
AA'EAF split network. 
KFSD WHIO AVIRE AVE BO. 

11:15 EST (Vi) — Singin' Sam. (Barbasol.) 

KLZ KSL KHJ KOIN KGB KFRC KOL 
KFPY KVI KFBK KMJ KWG KERN 
KDB. 

11:16 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

See Monday same time for stations. 
11:30 KST (Vi) — Leo Keisman's orch. with Phil 

Duey. (Philip Morris.) 

9:30 MST— KOA KTAR KGHL KGIR 
KDYL. 8:30 PST— KFSD KPO KFI KGW 
KOMO KHQ KGU. 10:30 CST— AVOAI 
WIRE AVI HA WEBC WDAY KFYR AVAA'E 
AVSM WMC AA'API AA'SB WJDX AVBAP 
KTHS KPRC AVKY'. 
(See also S:00 P.M. EST.) 
12:00 Midnight EST (Vi) — Buoyant Ben Bernie 
and his orch. (Pabst.) 

10:00 MST— KOA KPO. 9:00 PST— KFI 

KOMO KHQ KGAV KGU. 

WEDNESDAYS 
(Oct. 2nd. Hth. 16th. 23rd and 30th) 

8:46 KST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 

(For stations see Mondays.) 
7:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 

(For stations see Monday.) 
7:15 EST (Vi) — Tony nnd Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 
7:15 EST (Vi) — Uncle Ezra's Radio Station 

"E-Z-R-A." 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 
7:30 EST (Vi) — Lum and Abner. 

(See Monday for stations.) 
7:15 KST (%) — Boake Carter. (Phllco Radio 

Corporation.) 

(For stations see Monday.) 
7:45 KST (Vi) — Dangerous Paradise starring 
Elgle Hit* and Nick Dawson. (John H. 
Woodbury, Inc.) 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 
8:00 KST (Vi) — Johnnie and the Foursome. 
(Philip Morris.) 

AVABC WADC WOKO WCAO AVCAU 
AVJAS WEAN AVFBL WSPD WJSV WGR 
WHEC AVI, HZ WNAC WKRC WHK 
CKLAV WDRC 7:00 CST— WHHM K It NT 
AVFHM KMBC WHAS KMOX WCCO 
KFAB. . . 

8:00 KST (Vi) — Keiide7.\ons Musical — Jane 
Williams, Phil Duey, etc. (Life Saver*, 
Inc.) 

AV.IZ and basic blue network. 



(Continued on pat/e 84) 



RADIO STARS 




Pick and Pat 



{Continued from page 46) 



Pat . . . 



instantly transformed the blackface team 
into a blackface single and became "The 
Dixie Sunflower". 

But, being a good-hearted, fun-loving 
Irishman underneath all that burnt cork, 
he spent his money like a college boy on 
a spree. And the audiences, being normal 
human beings who wanted their money's 
worth, demanded two blackfacers instead 
of one. That's how it happened that the 
Dixie Sunflower found himself one day 
without any more bookings and no money 
in the bank. And that's how it happened 
also that this same little Sunflower started 
the long and fateful quest for a partner. 

The search brought him clear to New 
York. He had invested three of his last 
remaining nickles on a chicken pie in the 
Automat and was morosely nibbling it 
when a fellow sitting at his table clumsily 
spilled his cup of steaming coffee in Pat's 
lap. Pat got up, Irish temper riled, Irish 
fists poised d la Dempsey, he yelled : 
"Why, you bug-eyed ape!" The coffee- 
spiller yelled back : "Push your bare face 
in, you fan-footed fool". 

Pat's anger left and he scratched his 
head in amazement. Why, that was 
strictly a Beale Street colloquialism that 
no one but a blackface would know. Could 
it be possible? Could it possibly be pos- 
sible that out of all the six million people 
in New York, fate had contrived to steer 
him into that rare species of humanity — 
another minstrel man? They sat down 
and talked it over. They walked out part- 
ners. That was how Pat found Pick, 
Molasses found January, they both found 
a little fortune and radio found its bona- 
fide, genu-wine minstrel men. 

In spite of that varied background, Pat 
is a young man, still in his early thirties. 
He is a widower and is devoted to his five- 
year-old son. His wife, a former Vanities 
beauty, died out West on a Thursday just 
two months ago. Pat heard the news dur- 
ing a "Show Boat" rehearsal. The director 
offered to eliminate Molasses 'n' January 
from the program that night so that Pat 
could go out to her. But Pat, who had 
twenty years of the severest trouping be- 
hind him, stayed until the show was over 
before he flew West. For somehow, it 
just ain't like a minstrel man to quit his 
show in the middle, come what may. 
The End 



The Story of PICK 
is continued on page 85 



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84 



8:00 EST (Vi) — One Man's Family. (Standard 
Brands, Inc.) 

WEAF WTIC WTAG WEEI WWNC 
WPTF WIS WIOD WFLA WCSH WHIO 
WLW WJAR KYW WFBR WRC WGY 
WBEN WCAE WTAM WWJ WSAI. 7:00 
CST — WDAF WFM WSB KPRC WJAX 
WAPI WBAP KTHS WTMJ WIRE KSD 
WOW WHO WCKY WMAQ WIBA WEBC 
WKY WDAY KFYR WMC WJDX WSMB 
WAVE KVOO KTBS WOAI. 6:00 MST — 
KOA KDYL. 5:00 PST — KPO KGW 
KOMO KHQ KTAR KFI KSTP. 

8:30 EST (Ms) — "Broadway Varieties." Guy 
Robertson, guest baritone and master of 
ceremonies; Elizabeth Lennox, contralto; 
Victor Arden's orchestra and guest stars. 
Sponsored by American Home Products, 
Inc. (Bi-So. Dol.) 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WSPD 
WJSV WCAU WJAS WEAN WFBL 
WNAC WGR WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC. 
7:30 CST — WBBM WFBM KMBC WHAS 
KMOX KRNT KFAB. 

8:30 EST (Vi) — Lady Esther Serenade. Wayne 
King and his orchestra. 
(For list of stations see Tuesday.) 

8:30 EST (Vi) — House of Glass — dramatic 
sketch featuring Gertrude Berg, Joe Green- 
wa!d, Paul Stewart, Helen Dumas, Bertha 
Walden, Arlene Blackburn and Celia Bab- 
cock. (Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co.) 
WJZ WBAL WMAL WBZ WPTF WWNC 
WIS WJAX WIOD WFLA WTAR WSOC 
WJR KWK WLW WBZA WSYR WHAM 
KDKA WGAR WFIL. 7:30 CST — WLS 
WMT KSO WREN KOIL. 

9:00 EST (1) — Town Hall Tonight. Fred Al- 
len, Portland Hoffa. Jack Smart, character 
actor; Songsmith Quartet; Peter Van Stee- 
den's orchestra. (Bristol-Meyers Co.) 
WEAF WJAR WRC WTAM WEEI WLW 
WCAE WCSH WGY WWJ WTAG WFBR 
WBEN WTIC. 8:00 CST— WMAQ WOW 
KYW WDAF WHO KSD. 
(See also 12:00 midnight EST.) 

9:00 EST (%) — John Charles Thomas and 
His Neighbors; Frank Tours and his or- 
chestra. (William It. Warner Co.) 
WJZ network. 

9:30 EST (Vi) — Presenting Mark Warnow 
Variety program. 
WABC and network. 
10:00 EST (Vi) — Burns and Allen, comedians, 
Ferde Grofe's orchestra. (General Cigar 
Co.) 

WABC WADC WHEC WDBJ WOKO 
WKBW WCAO WJSV WNAC CKLW 
WORC WCAU WDRC WEAN WKBW 
WOKO WBIG WFBL WHK WJAS WKRC 
WSPD WBT. 9:00. CST — KRNT KMBC 
KFAB KSCJ WFBM KMOX WBBM 
WCCO KOMA KRLD KTHH KTSA. 8:00 
MST — KSL KLZ. 7:00 I'ST — KFPY 
KFRC KGB KHJ KOIN KERN KM J 
KFBK KDB KOI, KWG KVI. 
10:00 EST (Vi) — Log Cabin musical with Phil 
Cook and Conrud Thlbault. (General 
Foods. ) 

WEAF and basic red network. 
10:30 EST (Vi) — The March of Time. 

(For stations see Monday.) 
10:30 EST (Vi) — Coty Presents Ray Noble and 

his orchestra. 

WEAF WTIC WTAG WEEI WJAR WCSH 
WRC WFBR WGY WBEN WCAE WTAM 
WWJ WLW KYW. 9:30 CST — WHO 
WMAQ KSD AVOW WIRE WDAF. 

11:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 

For stations see Monday. See also 7:00 
P.M. EST.) 

11:15 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations ) 

11:30 EST (Vi) — Voice of Experience. (Wasey 
Products.) 

KLZ KSL KHJ KOIN KGB KFRC KOL 
KFPY KVI KFBK KM J KWG KERN 
KDB. 

12:00 Midnight EST (1) — Town Hall Tonight 
with Fred Allen and Portland llofl'a and 
cast . 

KOA KDYL KTO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ. 

THURSDAYS 
(Oct. 3rd, 10th. 17th. 24th anil 31st) 

6:45 EST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n' Andy. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:15 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations ) 

7:30 EST (Vi) — The Molle Show. 
WEAF and network. 

7:30 EST (Vi) — Lum and Abner. 
(See Monday for stations.) 

7:45 EST (Vi) — Boake Carter. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

8:00 EST (1) — Ktidy Vallce and his Connec- 
ticut Yankees. (Flelschmann's Yeast.) 
WKAF WCSH WRC WCAE WJAX KYW 
WWJ KTHS WWNC WIS WPTF WIOD 
WFLA WRVA CRCT WTIC WTAG WBEN 
WJAR WGY WTAM CFCF WLW WBB1 
WFBR. 7:00 CST— KVOO WFAA WMAQ 
KPRC WKY KSD WBAP WAPI WTMJ 
KSTP WDAF WJDX WSMB WSB WEBC 
WDAY WSM WOAI KFYR WHO WOW 
WMC. 6:00 MST— KDYL KOA KTAR. 
5:00 PST— KFI KPO KGW KOMO KHQ. 
K KSD. 



8:00 EST (Vi) — Harvester Cigar. (Cons. Cigar 
Corp.) 

WABC. 

8:30 EST (Vi) — Atwater Kent Hour. (Concert 
and operatic stars.) 

WABC. 

9:00 EST (1) — Lanny Ross Presents the Max- 
well House Show Boat. Frank Melntyre; 
Muriel Wilson, soprano; Helen Oelheim, 
contralto; Conrad Thibault, baritone; Mo- 
lasses 'n' January, comedy; Gus Haen- 
schen's Show Boat Band. 

WEAF WTAG WEEI WJAR WTIC 
WHIO WPTF WSOC WTAR WCSH 
WFBR WRC WGY WRVA WIOD WBEN 
WCAE WTAM WWJ WSAI WWNC WIS 
WJAX WFLA. 8:30 CST — WIRE WIBA 
WDAY WMAQ KSD WHO KYW KFYR 
WEBC WOW WDAF WTMJ WJDX WMC 
WSB WAPI WSMB WBAP KTBS WKY 
KPRC WOAI WSM WAVE KSTP. 7:30 
MST — KTAR KOA KDYL KGIR KGHL. 
6:30 PST — KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ 
KFSD. 

9:00 EST (Vi) — Death Valley Days. Dramatic 
sketches. (Pacific Coast Borax Co.) 
WJZ WBZ WBZA WJR WFIL WLW 
WSYR KDKA KBAL WHAM WGAR 
WMAL. 8:00 CST — WLS KOIL WREN 
KWK KSO WMT. 

10:00 EST (1) — Paul Whiteman's Music Hall; 
Helen Jepson, soprano; Ramona: the King's 
Men, and others. (Kraft.) 
WEAF WTAG WFBR WBEN KYW WWJ 
WPTF WJAX WEEI WCSH WTIC WFLA 
WIS CRCT WRC WCAE WLW WIOD 
WJAR WGY WTAM WRVA CFCF WWNC 
9:00 CST — WMAQ WAPI WMC WHO 
WOW WSMB WBAP WKY KTBS WOAI 
WIBA WEBC KSD KPRC WTMJ KSTP 
WDAF WSM WDAY KFYR KTHS WSB 
WAVE WJDX. 8:00 MST — KOA KTAR 
KDYL KOMO KPO KFI KGW KHQ. 

10:00 EST (Vi) — Alemite Half Hour. Horace 
Heidt's Brigadiers. (Stewart-Warner 
Corp.) 

WABC WOKO WCAO WNAC WDBO 
WCAU AVJAS WFBL WMBG WJSV 
WQAM WBT WBNS WGR WKRC WHK 
CKLW WDRC. 9:00 CST — WGST WBRC 
KRLD WOC KTRH KLRA WREC WCCO 
WLAC WDSU KTSA KTUL WNAX 
WFBM KMBC KFAB WHAS 8:0(1 I'ST — 
KERN KM J KHJ KOIN KFBK KGB 
KFRC KDB KOL KFPY KWG KVI WLZ 
KS I j 

10:30 EST (V 4 )— The March of Time. 

(For stations see Monday. ) 
11:00 EST <" 4 )— Amos 'n' Andy. 

(For stalions see Monday same time.) 
11:16 EST (Vi) — Tony and (ins. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

FRIDAYS 
(Oct. 4th, 11th, 18th and 25(h) 

6:45 EST (Vi) — Lowell Thomas. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EST (Vi) — Amos 'n 1 Andy. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:00 EST (Vi) — Just Entertainment. 

(For stations see Monday same time.) 

7:15 EST (Vi) — Tony and Gus. 

(See Monday same time for stations.) 

7:15 EST (Vi) — Cncle Ezra's Radio Station. 

7:30 EST (Vi)— Lum and Abner. 
(See Monday for station.) 

7:45 EST (Vi)— Boake Carter. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

7:45 EST (Vi) — Dangerous Paradise. Elsie 
Hits: and Nick Dawson. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

8:00 EST (Vi) — Socony Sketch-Book. Johnny 
Green and his orchestra; Virginia Verrill, 
singer, and Christopher Morlct . 
WABC WOKO WNAC WGR WDRC 
WEAN WICC WORC WLBZ WMAS 
WFBL WHEC WCAU. 

8:00 EST (1) — Cities Service Concert. Jessica 
Dragonette, soprano; quartette; Frank 
Itanta and Milton Rettenberg, piano duo; 
Rosario Bourdon's orchestra. 
WEAF WTIC WSAI WEEI KYW WIOD 
WHIO WCAE WWJ WCSH WRC WBEN 
WTAG CRCT WJAR WTAM WRVA 
(WGY off 8:30). 7:00 CST— KTHS WDAF 
WMAQ WKY KSTP (WTMJ on 8:30), 
WFAA WOAI KPRC KTBS KSD WHO 
WOW WEBC. 6:00 MST— KOA (KDYL 
on 8:15 to 9:00) KFBR (WBAP off 8:30) 
KVOO. 

8:00 EST (Vi) — Irene Rich. (Welch Grape 

Juice.) 

WJZ WBAL WBZ WBZA WGAR WJR 
WMAL WSYR WHAM KDKA 7:00 CST 
— WLS KSO WREN KOIL WSM WMC 
WSB WAVE WMT WIRE 6:00 MST— 
KDYL. 5:00 PST— KPO KFL KGW KOMO 
KHQ. 

8:30 EST (Vi) — Kellogg College Prom — Ruth 
Etting anil Hod Nichols and his orchestra; 
gliesl art is! . 
WJZ network. 

9:00 EST (Vi) — Wall/. Time. Vlvlenne Segal, 
soprano; Frank Miinn, tenor; Abe l.ymun'c 
orchestra* (Sterling Products.) 

WEAF WEEI WTAG WLW WRC WBEN 
WWJ WJAR WCSH WKHR WGY WTAM 

(Continued on page 86) 



RADIO STARS 




Pick and Pat 

{Continued from page 46) 
Pick . . . 



The war interrupted their act and Mrs. 
Pick went back to kicking up her heels 
in the chorus so that when Pick came 
back there would be some nickels in the 
bank. But the war had given Oklahoman 
Pick a glimpse of the outside world and 
a longing to escape the tight, gray rim of 
the Western deserts. When he returned, 
he and his wife emptied their bank account 
and made for New York. 

Then the fun began! Vaudeville just 
wasn't interested in a man-and-woman 
act. Too many of the darned things clut- 
tering up the New York stages. But an- 
other minstrel man like himself — well, 
said the managers, that might do the 
trick. So while Mrs. Pick stayed in the 
hotel room sitting on the trunk to make 
sure the management wouldn't hold it for 
rent, Pick went about looking for a male 
blackface teammate — just at the very mo- 
ment when another woebegone minstreler 
was hunting the Big Town for a partner. 

Fate — where are you? In a 48th Street 
Automat, no doubt, for that's where Pick 
spilled the eventful cup of coffee in Pat's 
lap. Thus introduced, they lumped nickels, 
ate and teamed up. Landing a vaudeville 
job a few days later they clicked from 
scratch and then cake-walked right into 
radio, fame and enough of a fortune for 
Pick to buy a big home in Flushing with 
a back yard which provides the juiciest 
bait for fishing tackle. 

Pick is ten years older than Pat and 
has two boys to Pat's one, but outside 
of those differences they're enough alike 
in personality, temperament and back- 
ground to have been twins. 

The End 




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Erno Rapee swings the baton and the 
Radio City Music Hall, world's largest 
theatre, is on the air, each Sunday. 



Three of the foremost personalities in the world of music and song discuss the 
future of entertainment. (Left to right) Victor Young, famous conductor and 
composer, maestro of Shell Chateau; Gene Buck, president of the American 
Society of Composers, and Al Jolson, Master of Ceremonies of Shell Chateau. 



85 



RADIO STARS 




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86 




(Continued from page 84) 



WCAE. 8:00 CST — WMAQ KSD WOW 
KTW WDAF. 

9:00 EST (1) — Campbell Soup Company pre- 
sents "Hollywood Hotel," with Dick Powell, 
Raymond Paige's orchestra, guest stars. 
WABC WADC WBIG WBT WTOC WMBR 
WHEC WIBX WCOA WHK WEAN WFBL 
WFEA AVBNS WCAO WCAU WDAE 
WDBJ WDRC WHP WICC WJAS WJSV 
WKBW WKRC WLBZ WMAS WMBG 
WNAC WOKO WORC WPG WQAM WSJS 
WSPD CFRB CKAC CKLW. 8:00 CST— 
KRNT WFBM WNOX WBBM KWKH 
WSFA WALA KFAB KFH KLRA 
KMBC KMOX KOMA KRLD KSCJ KTRH 
KTSA WACO WBRC WCCO WDOD WDSU 
WGST WHAS WIBW WLAC WMBD 
WNAX WREC KTTJL. 7:00 MST — KLZ 
KSL KVOR. 6:00 PST — KFPV KFRC 
KGB KERN KMJ KFBK KDB KWG KHJ 
KOH KOIN KOL KVI WNOX. 

9:00 EST (1) — Palmolive Beauty Box Theatre. 
Guest artist; John Barclay, baritone, and 
others; Al Goodman's orchestra. 
NBC Service to WEAF WTAO CFCF 
WRVA WPTF WWNC WIS WJAX WIOD 
WFLA CRCT KTW WTIC WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFBR WRC WGT WWJ WBEN 
WCAE WTAM WLW. 8:00 CST — KSTP 
WDAF WBAP KTBS WIRE KPRC WSB 
KVOO WMAQ KSD WHO WOW WTMJ 
WEBC WDAT KFTR WSM WMC WJDX 
WSMB WAVE WSOC KTAR WKY WOAI. 
7:00 MST — KOA KDTL KGIR KGHL. 
6:00 PST— KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ 
KFSD. 

10:00 EST (Ys) — Richard Himber and Stude- 
baker Champions. Stuart Allen, Vocalist. 

WABC WADC WOKO WCAO WCAU 
WJAS WFBL WJSV WBT WAAB WKBW 
WKRC WHK CKLW WDRC. 9:00 CST — 
WBBM WBNS KTW WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS KMOX WSPD WGST WBNS 
WGCO WSBT KFH. 
10:00 EST (Ms) — First Nighter. Drama with 
June Meredith, Don Ameche and Cliff Sou- 
bier, Erio Sagerquist's orchestra. (Cam- 
pana.) 

WEAF WEEI WGT WLW WTAM WTAG 
WRC WTIC WJAR WFBR WBEN WWJ 
WCSH WCAE. 9:00 CST— KSTP WMAQ 
KSD WHO WMC WOW WDAF WKY 
KPRC WEBC WSM WSB WSMB WFAA 
WOAI. 8:00 MST— KOA KDTL. 7:00 PST 
— KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ WTMJ. 

10:30 EST (%) — Mills Bros.; Hal Totten, sports 
talk; Art Knssel and His Kassels in the 
Air (Elgin Watch Co.) 
WEAF and network. 

10:30 EST (%)— The March of Time. 
(For stations see Monday.) 

11:15 EST (%)— Tony nntl (.n-. 



(See Monday same time for 
SATURDAYS 



=tations.) 



(Oct. 5th. 12th, 19th and Zdth) 

7:00 EST (V 4 ) — Briggs Sport Reviews of the 
Air with Thornton Fisher. (P. Lorillartl 

Co.) 

WEAF network. 

8:00 EST (1) — The Hit Parade — with Lennie 
Hayton and his orchestra; Kay Thompson, 
Gogo de Lys and Johnny Hauser, vocalists; 
and others. (American Tebacco Co. \ 
WEAF WTIC WEEI WJAR WWNC WI8 
WJAX WIOD WFLA WRVA WCSH WTAG 
KYW WHIO WFBR WRC WGT WBEN 
WCAE WLW WTAM. 7:00 CST— KVOO 
KTHS WIRE WMAQ KSD WHO WOW 
WDAF WIBA KSTP WEBC WDAT KFYR 
WPTF WMC WSB WAPI WJDX WSMB 
WAVE WTAR WSOC WKT KTBS KPRC 
WOAI. 6:00 MST — KTAR KOA KDTL 
KGIR KGHL. 5:00 PST — KPO KFI KGW 
KOMO KHQ KFSD KGU (WTMJ. WFAA 
S:30-9:00) (WSM WBAP 8:00-8:30). 

8:00 EST (Vfe) — Club Columbia. 
WABC and network. 

9:00 EST (Mt) — G Men. Authentic ca>es from 
official Department of Justice files drama- 
tized by Philips Lord. 

NBC Service to WEAF WTIC WRVA 
WPTF WTAR WSOC WWNC WIS WJAX 
WIOD WFLA WTAG WEEI WJAR WCSH 
KTW WFBR WRC WGT WBEN WCAE 
WTAM WWJ WHIO WLW. 8:00 CST— 
WIRE WMAQ KSD WOW WDAF WTMJ 
WIBA KSTP WEBC WDAT KFYR WAVE 
WSM WMC WSB WAPI WJDX WSMB 
WKT WBAP KTBS KPRC WOAI. 7:00 
MST — KTAR KOA KDTL KGIR KGHL. 
6:00 PST — KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ 
KFSD. 

9:30 EST (1) — The Shell Chateau starring Al 
Jolson with guest artists: Victor Young 
and his orchestra. (Shell Eastern Pe- 
troleum Products, Inc.) 

WEAF WTIC WTAG AVEEI WWJ KSD 
WRVA WPTF WWNC WIS WJAX 
WIOD WFLA WTAR WSOC WJAR WCSH 
KYW WHIO WFBR WRC WGY WBEN 
WCAE WTAM WSAI. 8:30 CST — WMAQ 
WDAF WIBA KSTP WEBC WDAT 
KFTR WHO WOW WTMJ. 7:30 MST — 
KDTL KOA KTAR KGIR KGHL. 6:8<1 
PST— KPO KFI KGW KOMO KHQ KFSD 
WLW. 

9:30 EST (1) — National Barn Dance. (Dr. 
Miles Laboratories.) 

W.IZ WBZ WBZA WSTR WFIL WBAL 
WMAL WHAM KDKA WGAR W JR 8:30 
CST — WLS WMT KSO WIRE KWK 
WREN KOIL. 



SCRRRIBLED 
STARS (OrlTEST 

Will be announced in the 

DECEITIBER ISSUE 

of 

RADIO STARS 

On Sale November 1st 



RADIO STARS 






Jernice Claire resumed her radio work 
jfrer a summer's absence in London, 
vhere she starred in a British musical 
film. She is heard in "Lavender and 
Did Lace," and also in "Melodiana." 

J7 &oiset the 
Studio! 

(Continued from page 40) 



nets — and the fact is one of radio's more 
depressing stories. Once it was Fray and 
Mario Braggiotti, finest of piano teams, 
but they have parted and Braggiotti is re- 
ported to be preparing his own unit for 
CBS listeners. Their partnership, it 
seems, was only pleasant in the tinkling, 
elaborate melodies it produced. 

SILVER LININGS 

Bright interest has been aroused in the 
smooth singing of Lois Ravel, but not long 
ago it appeared there would be no interest 
at all. A few months ago I noticed that 
Lois, favorite of the fashionable niteries, 
was lined up for a tremendous CBS build- 
up with Andre Kostelanetz. Shortly be- 



When he says Good bye 

DOES HE MEAN FOREVER? 



WILL the spell of your charm 
keep him thinking of you 
long after he says good-bye? It 
will ... if you know the secret 
power of Blue Waltz Perfume! 

Be one of the clever girls who 
have discovered how a touch of 
Blue Waltz Perfume on the hollow 
of the throat, behind the ears, 
along the part of your hair, gives 
a haunting fragrance that lingers 
in ones memory. A fragrance that 
will irresistibly beckon him back 
again and again. 

Blue Waltz face powder and lip- 
stick have the same seductive 
fragrance as Blue Waltz Perfume. 
Make triply sure of your magic 
by using all three tonight! For 
your protection all Blue Waltz 
cosmetics are laboratory tested 
and certified to be pure. Only 
\W each at your 5 and 10f* store 



Lu2 

FIFTH AVENUE 




ALONE AT LAST... 0 




WHO CARES FOR WEALTH OR HIGH POSITION 
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HEARTBURNS MADE YOU JUST A LOUSE- 
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'TUMS" SAYS FRIEND... E 




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why thousands carry 



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with the purchase of a 
10c roll of Turns or 
25cboxof NR (the all- 
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At your druggist's. 



the handy vest-pocket roll of TUMS with 
them always. TUMS contain a special antacid 
compound that cannot dissolve except in the 
presence of acid. When acid condition is cor- 
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TUMS contain no soda or any harsh alkali 
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TUMS 



FOR THE 
TUMMY 



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HANDY TO CARRY 



87 



RADIO STARS 




You simply can't expect to have sparkling 
eyes, a clear youthful complexion and plenty 
of pep, unless you insist on regular elim- 
ination. Never wait a second day. Take a 
beauty laxative. 

Olive Tablets gently and safely help nature 
carry off the waste and poisonous matter in 
one's system; keep you looking and feeling 
fine and fit. And they're non-habit-forming. 

Keep a box of these time-tried beauty 
laxatives handy for the times when nature 
skips a day. Three sizes, 15*-30e-60e. All 
druggists. 



DR. EDWARDS' 

Olive tablets 

the/&/^iaxat«ve 




KEEP WIRES 
OFF FLOOR 

(LAMPS AND RADIO) 



A neat job instantly. No dam 
age to woodwork. No tools 
needed. Set of eight colored 
clips to match vour cords. 10c. 
|At K-resge's 



STUDY NURSING 



AT HOME, 

SAID NANCY 7* 




After you're 35 It's hard to have to start job 
hunting. Especially If you have no training or 

business experience. I had neither. 

"You did a wonderful job of nursing John 
through his last illness." said Nanry who had 
stopped in to cheer me up. "Why don't you study 
nursing at home as I did?" 

Then she told me about Chicaihi School of 
Nursing and how easy it was to follow the In- 
teresting home-study lessons whenever you had a 
spare moment. She began to earn money after the 
first few lessons, and is always busy. 

Well. I sent for the C. S. N. booklet and found 
it full of interesting facts about the easy-to- 
understand lessons, monthly tuition payments and 
nurse's equipment furnished. 1 was particularly 
impressed by the testimonies of C. S. N. grad- 
uates. Not only are they successful in private 
practice but as doctors' assistants and as special 
nurses in hospitals and sanitariums. Some even 
have their own hospitals and rest homes! I de- 
cided to enroll at once and I've never been sorry! 
Ever Bince finishing the seventh lesson I've been 
busy — and my average salary Is $32 a week! 

Send today for your copy of "Splendid Oppor- 
tunities in Nursing." Learn how you can earn 
$115 to $35 a week as a trained practical nurse. 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dept. 2311 , 26 N. Ashland Blvd., Chicago, III. 

Please send free booklet and 32 sample lesson 
pages. 

.Yam* Age — 



dll/- 




The signal "on the air" finds a cast of fifty actors weaving an intricate pattern 
of voices and accents to compose the radio picture of American achievements 
known as "America's Hour." A part of the cast is shown above in a dynamic 
bit before the microphones. Depicting America at work in such fields as oil, 
medicine, aviation and agriculture, this program is heard over WABC. 



fore the premiere, Kostelanetz was called 
to Hollywood for Lily Pons' picture, and 
the show was called off. So was Lois. 
. . . But guess what the gal did ! Know- 
ing that future hreaks she might get would 
depend upon her mike technique, she de- 
termined to acquire some. She hired a 
complete radio studio and employed a top- 
notch engineer. Then she rehearsed while 
he touched up her radio personality. You 
hear the results. 

There's another gal — Dorothy Dreslin 
this time — whom you have been admiring. 
For a time it looked as though she were 
really washed up. That was live years ago 
w hen, socko ! she lost every vestige of a 
l>erfectly good coloratura soprano. Her 
voice just went haywire. She fretted about 
it for a bit, tried desperately, and with dis- 
astrous results, to run her scales, and 
finally gave up. . . . Last year she joined 
in with a group singing at a party. To 
her amazement her voice carried to a rela- 
tively high note — perfectly and clearly. 
She's with NBC now; and she tells me 
quite seriously that, although she got her 
voice back, it isn't quite the same one she 
lost. The timbre is there, but not the flexi- 
bility. At least another year must pass 
before she again can work the wonders she 
once so easily did in the upper register. 



TEMPERAMENT 

Now that Sigmund Romberg is back on 
the air, I can tell a story. It happened just 
a while back, when Romberg was vaca- 
tioning in Canada. One evening he at- 
tended a recital and liked the work of the 
harpist. Liked it so well, in fact, that he 
suddenly decided he would like to hear 
some of his own music played. He went 
through his pockets for a bit of paper on 
which to scribble his requests — and found 
none. So what did he do? . . . He sur«j 
prised the natives by ripping off his coH 
lar, writing on it, and calmly passing it 
down. 

However, the harpist was unimpressedJ 
Not only did he ignore the request. It 
later developed that he didn't even know 
any of Romberg's music. 

And of such are our fond and fleetinm 
delusions of fame! 

HOLLYWOOD 

The Theater of the Air, that hour playj 
you should listen to every Monday niijht,] 
is doing a lot to debunk the movie stars.1 
Never does one, in watching them re-l 
hearse, find the lurid temperamental disH 
plays with which tradition has credited 
them. Of course, all have their character-! 
istics. Wallace Beery sheds his coat, di^l 



88 



plays with his fireman suspenders, and 
manages to look pretty sloppy ; Leslie How- 
ard puffs coolly at a curve-stemmed pipe 
w hen he is not actually at the microphone ; 
most of the gals prefer to work in bedroom 
slippers. However, they go at it the same 
way you go at a job ; but, instead of say- 
ing, "Another day, another dollar," when 
they have finished, they usually say, "Three 
thousand dollars." 

Danny Danker is the man behind it all. 
He works out in Hollywood. First, he 
decides whom you are to hear ; then he 
follows that film star night and day until 
he signs him. He's been known to trail 
one to parties, to night clubs, to the moun- 
tains, and on to the lot. The movie kings 
and queens aren't exactly wild about mak- 
ing a special trip to New York, which 
they pay for themselves, and it takes a lot 
of persuasion. Danny has recently de- 
cided you shall hear Joan Crawford, Clark 
Gable and Greta Garbo. Crawford will 
probably be on in December, Gable in 
January. La Garbo is still at large. 

LONG TIME OFF 

Not long ago, just to be doing some- 
thing, T asked three radio stars where 
they expected to be in twenty years. 
Gracie Allen said, "It isn't I who will be 
in twenty years, it's daddy, and he's in 
San Quentin . . . and not only that, I'm 
not answering the question. My public is." 
. . . Benay Venuta and Virginia Verrill 
were a little more definite. Benay says 



RADIO STARS 

she will be doing Mary Boland roles on 
the legitimate stage; Virginia says she 
will be in California, married, and the 
mother of no fewer than six kids. 

WRONG NUMBER 

When Anne Seymour, "Grand Hotel" 
actress, was in the hospital recently, Jim 
(Fibber McGee) Jordan decided to send 
her a small radio that would cheer her up. 
With that in mind, he called the hospital. 

"Have you AC current in the hospital?" 
he asked. 

"No," came the blithe answer after a 
moment. "No one by that name at all." 

WHEN THE AUDIENCE IS AWAY 

You and I have stopped in at one of the 
studios to watch Popeye the Sailor's efforts 
to come into existence as a radio star. 
... A young man is standing before the 
microphone and reading from a script in 
which Popeye is stopping a runaway horse 
to aid a helpless child. As the scene be- 
comes more dramatic, we notice that the 
young man is talking in a tone not. nearly 
so deep as the amazing sailor's. The di- 
rector who is casting the show notices it, 
too. He shouts : "Can you make it a little 
more gruff here? Just to give us an 
idea?" . . . "Sure," agrees the actor. He 
speaks one line gruffly, with an effort. 
Then he says: "I'm going to be all right. 
It's just a little too deep to practice." . . . 
Later, we learn that the actor they really 
want for the part is another fellow, Billy 




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VOU can now make at home a bet- 
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buy, by following this simple recipe: 
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bay rum, a small box of Barbo Com- 
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When they're on the air, Tuesdays and Thursdays, entertainment is assured. 
Here are three popular favorites — Walter O'Keefe, Deane Janis and Louis 
Sorin, comedian, singer and character actor respectively — of the Camel Caravan. 
And what fun they're having, staging an impromptu scene in a sylvan setting. 




RADIO STARS 




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quickly bubbles up into a foamy froth 
which removes the dust-laden oil film 
that streaks your hair. You'll be delighted 
the way Blondex brings back the true 
golden radiance to faded blonde hair — 
makes natural blonde hair more beauti- 
ful than ever. Try it today. Sold in all 
good drug and department stores. 



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BRIC-A-BRAC 
ETC. 1 




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k OLD (01 MS, BIUS and STAMPS 



I POST YOURSELF! It pays! / „ 

I paid $400.00 to Mrs. Dowty ttj 
I of Texas, forone Half Dollar; T 
» J.D.Martinof Virginia $200.00 , 
for a single Copper Cent. Mr. ■ 
Manning of New York, $2,600.00 for ( 
oneSilverDollar. Mrs.G. F.Adams, Ohio, > 
received $740. OOforafewold coins. Iwill pay big prices 
for all kinds of old coins, medals, bills and stamps. 
I WILL PAY $100.00 FOR A DIME! 

1894 S. Mint: $50.00 for 191:1 liberty Hend Nickel (not HufTalo) r 
and hundreds of other BnwinK prices lor coins. Send 4c fori 
Large Illustrated Coin Folder and further particulars. It may 
mean much profit to you . Write today to jbj 

B. MAX MEHL, 456 Mehl Bldg., FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

(Largest Rare Coin Establishment in U. S.) 



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Above perfumes sell for$12.00an ounce. 
A single drop lasts a week. To cover 
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you select (limit: 5 trial bottles), 

PAUL RIEGER (Est. 1872) 
1 36 Davis Street San Francisco 

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perfume selling at $2.00 to $6.00 an ounce— (1) Hollywood, 
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90 




Ladies and gentlemen, we present Mr. and Mrs. Lanny Ross. Mrs. Ross is the 
former Olive White, who for three years has been Lanny's personal representa- 
tive and business manager. She will continue in that capacity, retaining her 
name, Olive White. The marriage took place July 29th at Millbrook, N. Y. 



Costello, who does Popeye for the cartoon 
movies. The voice has to be authentic, for 
Popeye will not clout roughnecks in the 
script, but will use his Herculean strength 
to do good. 

This time, we're admiring Cornelia Otis 
Skinner as she runs through her script. 
The Distinguished Service Award winner 
smiles occasionally with quick brightness at 
a man who talks to the sound effectician. 
He is her husband, Alden Blodgett. 
It has been reported — though we don't see 
it happen — that Blodgett is enthusiastic 
about sound gadgets, and has been prom- 
ised the chance to manipulate them during 
one of his wife's programs. The gag is 
that each week he is told he had better 
wait until the next time. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Many more amazing and amusing things 
happen during the broadcast of a special 
event program than get on the air. Here's 
an example: 

Recently, a party of broadcasters 
journeyed out to sea aboard the steam 
trawler Hckla to report the adventures of 
large scale fishing. Alan Kent, the suave, 
moustachioed young announcer, was along. 
He is a bright boy with a ready tongue, 
and during the first few hours aboard, kept 
up a steady flow of wisecracks. Finally 
the captain of the Hckla, smiling not at 
all, interrupted to tell him that no man with 
hair on his face was allowed to sleep on 
the boat. Kent was incredulous, at first. 
He scoffed at the idea and flatly refused 
to harm a hair of his beloved cookie 
duster. But as the day wore on and the 
captain remained adamant, Kent gave in. 
It was a crestfallen announcer who de- 



scribed the thrills of commercial fishing 
the next day. 

THE LAST WORD 

The night NTG and his Girls opened on 
the air, I went to the party given for him 
at his Paradise restaurant. Early in the 
morning, he asked the engineer who had 
handled his show how he liked it. 

"Fine," said the technician, "but watch 
your ad libbing." 

"For instance?" suggested Granny. 

"That place where you turned to the 
girl and said, 'I'm going to play on that 
big thing behind you.' " 

"I meant the zylophone." 

"Of course. But 'Skeets' Miller was 
behind me and he was listening. All he 
had to do was say the word, and bing! — 
the show would have been off the air." 

Who is this "Skeets" Miller? 

Well, he's a number of things. His full 
name is William Burke Miller. He's 
night program manager of NBC, onetime 
winner of the Pulitzer prize for newspaper 
reporting and a most excellent guy. 

I talked to him about this power to cut 
shows off the air, and though he didn't 
deny it, he did his darndest to deflate it. 
It seems that Janet MacRorie, who heads 
the NBC department of good taste, has 
every script that is to go on the air under 
scrutiny twenty-four hours before it is 
used. Miss MacRorie, I gather, is death 
on dirty innuendoes, and comes down on 
the vaguest of them with a whoop and a 
holler. Therefore, bad taste is eliminated 
in her office and Mr. Miller has little to 
worry about — except in rare cases of bois- 
terous ad libbing. 

The End 



RADIO STARS 



(Continued from page 9) 



VIENNE SEGAL. Chapter No. I: Mrs. Paula Aube, 
I Umt S. Xoiinamlie, lliillynuuil, Calif.; rietro Cln- 
I finl. 620 S. Alexandria, Los AiiKrlcs, Calif. : Mon- 
iii' l.ii'. L'lUO N. Arcvle St.. Hnllywoml. Calif.; Miss 
Inlioila Ki!oll, ."'(ill Riisomore St., Bollywood, Calif.; 
I Mrs. Henry Hudson. !!2."> Jiith St., Santa Monica, Calif.; 

Shown DoncKan, t>17 N. Bedford Drive, Keverly Hills. 
, Calif.; Miss Louise C. Francis, 1516 N. Fairfax. Holly- 
I ivooil. Calif.: Miss Gladys Lincoln, 5.S4I1 Sunset Itlvd.. 
I Hollywood. Calif.; Mr. Ernesto l'leilra, 1354 N. Harper 
St., Hollywood. Calif.; Mr. Donald Murray. lTUi'S; 
PC. lvar St., Hollywood. Calif.; Mrs. 1*1) i lip liaker, 1334 
IN. Harper Ave., Hollywood, Calif.; Kliy Ertz. Beverly 
Wilshire Hotel, Beverly Hills, Calif.; Miss Daisy 
Coleman. 444 N. La Jolla. Hollywood, Calif.; Mr. Oil- 
liert Brown. Sycamore St., Pasadena, Calif.; Miss 
Shirley Davis, 1S33 Alsara Ave., Hollywood. Calif.; 
Miss Dorothy Feron, 002 Idaho, Santa Monica, Calif.; 
Miss Emma Pederson. 730 X. Rodeo Drive. Beverly 
•Hills. Calif.; Mr. Rudolph Marx, I'.KW Wilshire Blvd.. 
Los Anceles, Calif.; Miss Helen O'Birne. 517 S. Ken- 

e. I>os Angeles, Calif. ; Frances Stanwood, 120 N. 

Swall Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. ; Mr. Rafael Storm. 
1609 PC. PCormandle St., Hollywood. Califc ; J. W. Has- 
berg. 509 Hillcrest Drive, Beverly Hills. Calif.: Mr. 
Eddie Clayton. 0731 Leland Way. Hollywood. Calif.; 
Mrs Milton Cohen, 433 Beverly Glen Blvd.. Hollywood, 
Calif.: Mr. Ernesto Vilches, 1826 N. Winona, Holly- 
wood, Calif. ; Miss Jane Whitney. 733 South Cochran 
Ave., Los Angeles, Calif.: Mr. Ed Eichler, 1027 N. 
(Vermont, Hollywood, Calif. ; Miss Anna Harvvood, 4705 
Fountain Ave.. Hollywood, Calif.; Mr. Phil Berg, 
1509 X. Vine St.. Hollywood. Calif.; Mr. Roland Bos- 
jwell. Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, Calif.; Miss 
[Louise Storm. 1609 N. Xormandie, Hollywood, Calif.; 
iMlss Elsie Cavanna, 5424 Franklin St., Hollywood, 
Calif.; Mr. Dudley de Larigue. 1949 Grace Ave.. Holly- 
wood, Calif.; Miss Gladys Lorenzon. 7964 Fountain 
Ave.. Hollywood. Calif.; Mrs. C. English. English 
Oaks, Pasadena. Calif.; Miss Virginia Howard. 1350 
IN. Cresent Hgts., Hollywood, Calif.: Miss Louise 
Probaseo. 533 S. Westmoreland. Hollywood, Calif.; Miss 
I Mary K. Martin. 1119 Poinsetta Drive, Hollywood, 
I Calif. ; Mrs. Russell Simpson, 1609 X. Xormandie, 
Hollywood, Calif.; Mr. Dan Kelly, 143S X. Cower St., 
I Hollywood, Calif.; Iwan Barger, 1364 Anclenes Drive, 
I Glendale, Calif.; Mrs. Cosmo Bellew. Ambassador 
Hotel. Los Angeles. Calif. : Miss Josephine Adair, 
I 14S5 Mariposa, Los Angeles, Calif.; Mrs. William Boyd, 
l 525 X. Arden Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif.; Jliss Gladys 
Belcher, 1323 X. Orange Drive. Hollywood. Calif. ; Mrs. 
Pernall Pratt, Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Beverly Hills, 
i Calif. : Miss Lily Freeman. Greystone Hotel, Xew York 
| City; Miss Elizabeth Holm, 5504 Spruce St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa.,- Miss Dorothy Greene. 125 E. S4ih St., 
J Xew York City; Miss Louise Storm. 1609 X. Xormandie, 
Hollywood, Calif. ; Mrs. Walter J. Hill, 1533 Shenan- 
doah Drive, Seattle, Wash. 
.UM AND ABNER. Chapter No. 2: Mr. C. .1. Reilly. 
1130 Main St., Racine, Wise.; Miss Vivian Johnson, 
1006 Park Ave., Racine, Wise. : Miss Fidelis Rawson. 
820 Main St., Racine. Wise; Miss Clara Finster, S33 
College Ave., Racine, Wise; Miss Genevieve B. Addi- 



son. SOU Lake Ave.. Apt. 4. Racine, Wise; Miss Irene 
A. Thorson, 2022 Washington Ave.. Racine. Wlac. ; 
Mrs. G. L. fecheel, 1122 E. 62ud St.. Chicago. Ill ; 
Mr. Marvin J. K. Llovd. 2321 Carmel Ave.. Racine. 
Wise; Miss Andrea G. Pultz, Box 40. Rome 2; Racine. 
Wise; Miss Helen Goedeke. 420 Romayne Ave. Racine, 
Wise; Mrs. Mary Lang. Box 40, Route 2, Racine, Wise 

LITTLE JACKIE HELLER, Chapter No. I: Miss Cath- 
erine Hill. 021 Gay St.. Phoenixville, Pa.; Jliss Norma 
Barlow, 023 Gav St., Phoenixville, Pa.; Miss Elvira 
Barkasv, loo Quid! St.. Phoenixville, Pa.; Jliss Eleanor 
KotyO, 207 Gav St., Phoenixville. Pa.; Jliss Idamay 
Scotl, 401 S. 5th St.. Reading, Pa.: Miss Rhoda Bar- 
low. 6:3 Gay St., Phoenixville, I'a. ; Jliss Charlotte 
Seen, 848 Hall St., Phoenixville, Pa.: Jliss Anna M. 
Hille, 021 ",iay St., Phoenixville, Pa.; Jlrs. N. JI. Bar- 
low. 623 (iay St.. Phoenixville, Pa.; Jliss Ethel Dani- 
thr.me, Vallev Forge Road, Phoenixville, Pa.; Jliss 
Helen Hill. 621 Gav St., Phoenixville, Pa. 

GALE PAGE, Chapter No. I: -Miss Vivian Bretz. 417 X. 
3rd St., Lehighton, Pa.; Jliss Lauretta Stare. 243 Car- 
bon St., Lehightcn, Pa.: Jliss Xaomi Stare, 243 Carbon 
St., Lehighton, Pa.; Jliss Vera Stare. 337, X. 3rd St., 
Lehighton. Pa.; Jliss Rovine Bretz, 417 X. 3rd St.. Le- 
hightcn. Pa.; Jliss Elois Longacre. 816 Mahoning St.. 
Lehighton, Pa. ; Jliss Dorothy Sharbough, 430 X. 3rd 
St., Lehighton, Pa.; Jliss Jlarjoric Sharbough, 436 
X. 3rd St., Lehighton. Pa.: Jliss Lillian JIullin. 292 
Pope Ave, Toronto, Ontario. Canada; Bob Toennies. 
Route 2. De Soto. JIo. ; Miss Mildred Chaille, 129 
Clinton St., Dayton. Ohio; Jliss Violet Stearnes, 3SS 
X. Kenilworth, Elmhurst. 111.; Jliss Anita Pitta, 609 
lath St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Jliss JIarian Jentz, 102 
Englewood. Buffalo. N. Y. 

LITTLE JACKIE HELLER, Chapter No. 2: Jliss Louise 
Peterson. 412y 2 14th St.. Jloline. 111.; Jliss Dorothy 
Slaes, 1715% 17th St., Jloline, 111.; Jliss Jlelba Eck- 
stram. 1102 12th St., Rock Island, 111.: Miss Beatrice 
Eckhardt, 1102 12th St., Rock Island, 111.; Jliss Doris 
Winter, 94S 20th Ave. Rock Island. 111.; Jliss Hettie 
JIae Tribble, 1221 7th Ave, Rock Island, 111.; Jliss 
Jiarv Scott. HON 1 /*. 4th Ave., Moline, 111.: Jliss 
Loraine McCartney, 1715 17th St., Jloline, 111.; Jliss 
Arvein Blackwell. 140S% 4th Ave. Jloline, 111.; Miss 
Jane Phillips, 1104 12th St., Rock Island, 111. 

TITO GUIZAR. Chapter No. I : Jliss Virginia Haas. 
14209 Ardmore. Detroit, Jlichigon; Jliss Ruth Wen- 
ters. 100S Ferdinand, Detroit. Jlich. ; Mr. Harry Haas. 
14012 Grand River, Detroit, Jlieh. ; Jliss Sybil Peter- 
son, 2707 Lathrop Ave., Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. Edith 
Peterson, 2707 Lathrop Ave., Detroit, Jlich.; Jliss 
Helen Raether, 311 S. Jlingo Ave., Albion, Jlich.; Jliss 
Vivian West, 13258 Ardmore, Detroit, Jlieh. ; Jliss 
JIabel Haas, 80S Park Ave., Detroit, Jlich.; Jliss 
Blanche Haas, 91 E. Kirby, Detroit, Jlich. ; Miss 
Marion King, 13226 Ardmore, Detroit, Mich. 

DICK POWELL, Chapter III: Jlr. James Styles. P. O. 
Box 62. Calvert, Texas; Jliss Mary Du JIaln. General 
Delivery, Calvert. Texas; Jlr. JIanuel Toube. Box 186, 
Calvert, Texas; Jliss Heien Lacklier, General Delivery, 
Calvert, Texas: Jliss Stella Styles. Box 62. Calvert, 
Texas; Britton Briggs, Box 135, Calvert, Texas; Delois 
Londenberg, 5315 Terry St., Dallas, Texas; Mr. Carl 




A bit of horse-play makes the whole world grin! Here is a novelty, showing' 
members of the Fred Waring organization in an unconventional performance. 
(Left to right) Budd Huliclc, Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Stella Friend, and 
(center) Fred Waring and Col. Stoopnagle. 




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91 



RADIO STARS 




I tried every high-priced talcum end 
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Select your favorite from these five 
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What did Amos say 
to Andy? 

SEE OUR 

CRAZY CAPTION CONTEST 

ON PAGES 30-31 



Yes, you've guessed it! It's Amos 'n' Andy! Here is Gosden, arguing as the 
lordly Kingfish, while Correll, in his favorite role of Andy, unholds his part in 
the argument. And now if we only had television. . . . 



'Tke JliAtenetl' Jleajue (f alette 



(Continued from page 91) 



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See, too, all the new valuable 
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Stylos. P. 0. Box 02. Calvert, Texas: Mr. Cecil Du 
Main. General Delivery, Calvert. Tex. ; Elgin Lawrence 

Eskridgc, General Delivery, Calvert, Texas. 

FRANK PARKER. Chapter IV: Miss Eleanor F. Ander- 
son. 12 Maurice Ave., Ossining. N. Y. : Miss Jaeitueline 
Mosso, 4b' Stuyvesant Ave., Newark. N. .1.; Miss Mar- 
caret Mbffat. lti Schley Ave.. 1 Iyatt sville. Mil.; Miss 
Bhoda M. Bain. 192" X. Soeuldlng Ave., Chicago. 111.; 
Miss (Mara Gysel. 210 Maple Ave.. Waukesha. Wise.: 
Miss Kleanor C. Mercy. 138 Shcpard Ave.. Baal Orange, 
X. J. : Miss Alyce F. Knnzcl, 1T"2 Park Place. Brooklyn, 
X. Y. ; Mrs. Clement Smith. 1SS1 Monroe Ave.. Bronx. 
N. Y. ; Mr. B. Bradley. 209 Warren St., Brooklyn. 
N. Y. : Mrs. Winkle F. Grllllth. Box 104, Centerineh. 
L. I.: Miss Madeleine Caron. 781 Third Ave.. New York 
City: Miss Marie GrinU, 1132 Y'oungstown Road, S.K., 
Warren. Ohio: Miss ltose Haii7.Uk, 1602 Dcnlson Ave., 
Cleveland. Ohio. 

VERA VAN, Chapter No. II: Miss Faith Ferris. Box 174. 
North Vassalhoro, Maine; Miss Naomi Itoels. 11H2 
Chicago St.. Green Bay. Wise; Miss Frances Kauf- 
mann. Box 41, Gastonia, X. C. ; Miss Margaret Connell, 
811 ProaPect ltd.. Des Moines, la.: Mrs. Vivian Ben- 
son, Box 67, Cuha, NT. Y ; Miss Thea Dowries. 19 K. 
4th St., Mt. Vernon. N. Y. ; Miss Irene I.. Brettmann, 
895 Park Ave., New York City: Miss Mlinutte Sher- 
mak, 328 E. 90th St.. New Y'ork City; Miss Lorraine 
Mason, 112 X. 6th St., Vineland, X. .1.: Miss Florence 
It. .in • 'it, 1683 I'nlv.rsltv Ave., New York City. 
CONRAD THIBAULT. Chapter IV: Miss Grace Clarke. 
25 Sixth St., X. Pelham. N. Y. ; Mr. John Babcock, 
106 So. 12th Ave.. Mt. Vernon, X. Y. ; Mr. Leslie Wlnt- 
ler, 6780 Seaflew Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. ; Mrs. JOlslo 
Williamson, 66 West Olive St.. Long Beach, I.. I.; 
Miss Grace Garrnmon, 1200 Arnow Ave., Bronx, X. Y". : 
Mr. Reggy Clarke. 25 Sixth St.. Pelham, New Y'ork; 
Mr. Daniel Lynch. 25 Sixth St.. X. Pelham, X. Y. ; 
Miss Kuth Montgomery, 6 Bank St., New York City; 
Mr. William Montgomery, 6 Bank St., New York City; 
Mr. Charles A. Brown, Hawthorne Gardens, Mammaro- 
neck. X. Y'. : Miss Loretta Garramon, 1260 Arnow Ave., 
Bronx, X. Y. 

NELSON EDDY. Chapter No. V: Miss Marianne Ham- 
mond, 23 Ashland Ave., Fast Orange, X. J. : Miss 
Lauretta Hammond. 23 Ashland Ave.. Fast OiHiigo, 
X. J.: Miss Alma Barr. 3130 Brighton 7th St.. Brook- 
lyn, X. Y'. ; Miss Lojlse Flthlan. 1 Bcntlev St.. Totten- 
villo. S. I , N. Y". ; Miss An .ela Marciano. 5311 4th 
Ave.. Brooklyn, X. Y. ; Miss Edna Gohllnghorst, 1043 
Wnndrow Road, Huguenot Park, S. I.; Miss Anne 
Marciano. 5311 4th Ave.. Brooklyn. X. Y". ; Mr. Robert 
llussell Flthlan. 1 Bentlye St.. Tottrnvllle, S. I.; Sir. 
Curtis Hammond, 23 Ashland Avenue. Kail Orange, 
N. J.j Miss Charlotte Splndler, 250 West End Ave., 
Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn, X. Y\ 

JESSICA DRAGONETTE, Chapter No. I: Miss Gladye 
McLoughlln. 135 S. Broadway St.. De Pere. Wise.; 
Miss Jane Meetcrson. 243 No 11th St., Newark. N. J.; 
Miss Orpha M. Dolph, 22315 Olmstcad, Dearhorn. 
Mich.; ,Miss Geraldlne Cleaver, Anita. Iowa: Misj 
Florence Mu/zcy, 250 School St., Watertown, Mass- 
Mr. Arthur ZaretUba, 128 S. 11th St.. Newark, N. J.; 
Miss Genevieve Maro. 2123 E. Somerset st„ Phila- 
delphia. Pa.; Miss Gladys. McLoughlln, 135 S. Broad- 



way. De Pere. Wise: Mr. Kenneth Little. 607 North- 
ampton. Easton. Pa.: Miss Evelyn M. Bainum. 327 
Meyran Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Miss Dorothy L. Glass, 
113 Alger Ave.. Detroit, Mich. 

LEAH RAY. Chapter No. 1: Miss Rose Lurched. 1621 
Juniata St., Phlla.. Pa.: Miss Kathryn Genshauer, 
3756 X. 9th St.. Phlla., Pa.: Miss Frances Chase. 3937 
X. 10th St.. Phlla., Pa.: Miss Frances Washburn. 47 
Bellevue Terrace. Colllngswixxl. X. J.: Miss lluth 
Bandoli, 115 Third St.. Eau Claire. Wise ; Miss Klolse 
llaselbuseh. Biggs. Calif.: Miss Katrine Keever. 808 
E. Main St.. Greenville. Ohio; Miss Edna Rogers, 3730 
N. 8th St.. Phlla.. Pa.; Miss Marina E. Dlolalcvl. 32 
Meade St.. Milford, Mass.: Miss Jean Klaiss. 3754 N. 
9th St.. Phlla.. Pa.; Miss Violet Zeller, Shoppion, Pa. 

AMOS AND ANDY, Chapter No. I: Mr Al Beruhe, 904 
Emory- St., Ashury Park, X. J.; Mr. Steve Art. las. 515 
4th Ave., Ashury Park, X. J.; Mr. J. F. Tinker, 513 
3rd Ave., A*bury Park. X. J.: Mrs. M. Andrews. 901 
Emory St., Ashury Park. X. J. ; Mrs. II. Tinker, 513 
Third Ave., Ashury Park. X. J.; Mr. M Andrews. 904 
Emory St., Ashury Park, X. J.; Miss Rose Chamudes. 
1203 Heck St., Ashury Park. X. J.: Miss Blanche 
Gann, 301 La Relne Ave., Ashury Park, X. J. : Miss 
Barbara I-azzo, 406 Third Ave.. Asbury Park, X. J.; 
Miss Helen Rogers. Allemvood. X. J. 

LANNY ROSS. Chapter No. VIII: Miss Helen A. Juracka. 
3293 West 23rd Place, Cleveland. Ohio: Mrs. Helen 
Bordas, 2030 Corning Ave, Cleveland, Ohio; Mrs. Mary 
K. Juracka, 3293 West 23nl Place. Cleveland. Ohio: 
Miss Anita Kepke. 3292 West 23rd Place. Cleveland, 
Ohio: Miss Vera Kuhasak, 3222 West 14th St.. Cleve-Jl 
land, Ohio; Miss Lydia E. Parobek. 3325 East 65th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio; Miss Lillian Sadlowskl. 722 Col lege I 
Ave., Cleveland, Ohio; Miss Ann Simeon. 4503 Lincoln | 
Ave., Parma, Ohio: Miss Estelle Stramowskl. 
Bancroft Ave., Cleveland, Ohio; Miss Mary Zajac, 
Corning Ave., Cleveland. Ohio. 

BLOCK AND SULLY. Chapter No. I: Mr. Rohert Miller, 
1411 Willow St.. U'hanon, Pa ; Mr. Rohert Hair. 407 
Union St., 1 . 1 .N1 1 11 Pa.: Mr. Warren Sealer. 1411 
Willow St.. U'hanon. Ta. : Mr. George F. Paine. 419 N. 
6th St., Lebanon, Pa.; Mrs. Tlllle Johnson. 1415 Wtl- , 
low St.. Lebanon, Pa.; Miss Thclma Nye. 343 W Cum- 
berland St., Lebanon, Pa. : Mr Robert Brotigh, 326 
Federal St.. I^banon. Pa. : Mr. Clarence Anspaeh, Route 
1. Palmyra. Pa.: Mr. Norman Barshlnger. 321 Federal ; 
St., 1 - ' , . Pa.; Mr. Stanley Degbler, 412 Gannon! 
St., Ix-hanoti. Pa. 

FRED WARING. Chapter No. I: Mr Milton Cable, 1085 
15th St.. San Bernardino. Calif : Mr Charley C Hud- 
son, 10S5 15th St.. San Bernardino. Calif.: Mr William 
J. Hudson. 1085 15th St., San Bernardino. Calif : Mr*,/ 
Ida M Hudson, 1085 15th St.. San Bernardino. Calif.J 
Mr. Charles F. Davis. 10S5 15th St.. Sim BeinardlnoJ 
Calif. : Mrs Peggy Davis, 1085 15th St.. San Ber- 
nardino, Calif.: Mrs. Margaret J, Hudson, Ins.". 15UJ. 
St., San Bernardino, Calif.; Mr. Eugene L DarlU 
1085 15th St., San Bernardino. Calll.: Mr Clmel 
Wlilte. 1085 15th St.. San Bernardino, Calif : Mr RaM 
taond Goble. 1685 1Mb St . San Bernaidlno, Calif,;] 
Mr. Onls White, 10S5 15th St.. San Bernardino. Cain 

(Continued on page 95) 



i.l lege 
iin-iiln 

MIS 

2028 



92 



RADIO STARS 




The four Lombardos and 
[Left to Right) Carmen, 


a friend enjoy a late summer outing as gay sea-dogs! 
Leibert, Guy and Victor. In the rear is Fred Utal. 


Jleap 


Uefiote Ifou 

(Continued from page 27) 


Jlook 



himself championing an unpopular cause, 
he would have dropped it. He would have 
looked where he was going, and he would 
have seen that he was heading straight 
for trouble. He would have seen bitter 
months of ostracism, of hatred facing him. 
And he would have turned right about. 

Instead, he defied one hundred and fifty 
raging strikers, and with one other man 
he continued to work in the lumber com- 
pany, because he thought he was right. 
And while he worked in the yard there, 
the strikers came and threw rocks at him. 

"Scab!" was the mildest word they 
called him. "Traitor 1" rang in his ears. 
People who had been his friends turned 
and walked away when they saw him. 
The superintendent took him down to the 
mill each day in a special car. It was 
not safe for him to walk on the streets 
alone. Strikers were lying in wait for 
him; men who had been his buddies be- 
fore, but who would have taken his life if 
they'd had a chance now. Or sent him 
maimed to the hospital. 

Even when the strike ended, the men 
continued to hate Tiny, to blame him be- 
cause they hadn't won what they asked 
for. No one at the mill would talk to him 
or associate with him. He walked among 
these men, his former friends, lonely and 
a stranger. 

His whole community was down on him. 

It was impossible to keep on working at 
that place, with the hatred a living, pal- 
pable thing he could feel in the very air 
he breathed. So he went to work for a 
sheet-metal life-boat manufacturing com- 
pany. And a year later he once more 
leaped before he looked. And faced dis- 
aster once again. Only this time he was on 
the other side of the fence. 

Honestly it seems almost as if he went 
gunning for trouble. He discovered that 
the company he was working for was chis- 



eling on the salaries they paid the men. 
They weren't paying them what the gov- 
ernment required. But Tiny was earn- 
ing a good salary, so if he'd been wise he 
would have kept quiet and let the plant- 
owner chisel all he pleased. 

But it wasn't in Tiny to do that. To 
the owner of the plant he went and said : 
"If you don't pay back every nickel you've 
chiseled the men out of, we'll strike." 

"You're crazy !" said the owner of the 
plant, "you're a trouble maker— get out of 
here." 

So Tiny led the men out in a strike. 
The place closed down. 

Then Tiny went down to the Boiler 
Makers' Union and told them how the 
manufacturer was chiseling, and asked 
them not to put any of this man's boats 
on the big ocean steamships. He went to 
the United States Shipping Board in Se- 
attle, and told them what this manufac- 
turer was doing. They cracked down on 
him. In three days the men won their 
strike. And the owner of the plant took 
every one of the strikers back except Tiny 
and one other man who'd helped him or- 
ganize the men. Tiny was left out in 
the cold. "If I ever catch you so much 
as hanging round this place again," the 
owner threatened him, "I'll have you 
arrested." 

And Tiny, desperate, bitter, disillusioned, 
left the United States and went up to 
Alaska. At an agency in Seattle they 
told him that they could use a webman 
and a trap builder in a cannery in 
Alaska. 

"That's fine," said Tiny, "I'll go." 

No matter that he didn't know what a 
webman did, how a trap builder worked. 
There would be time enough to worry 
about that later on. 

On the way up to Alaska Tiny met other 
workmen, some of them sturdy Norwe- 





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gians. He asked them about the work he 
had signed to do. and they explained what 
it was like. So when he got to Alaska 
he was ready for these new, strange tasks. 

He arrived in the spring, before the 
snows had melted, and dug his way 
through twelve feet of snow to find the 
bunkhouse where he was to sleep. A 
room eight feet square with one window. 

All this time the conviction had been 
growing in Tiny that he ought to find 
some work into which he could throw him- 
self heart and soul. Since he had been a 
boy of seven he had sung, and his mother 
and father honestly believed that he could 
become a famous singer if he chose. 

All right. He'd become a singer. Never 
mind that he didn't have the money to 
pay. for singing ^ lessons. He'd earn it 
somehow. So one blazing hot day, when 
the heat was like a blanket over New 
York, he arrived in the Big City with 
twenty-five dollars in his jeans. 

He must find a place to live. Where 
does one live when one has only twenty- 
five dollars, and no job in sight? 

Up and down the streets he tramped 
looking for a room. Finally he found 
one, in a good neighborhood. But the 
room itself was as tiny, as niggardly, as 
horribly cramped as a prison cell. It was 
really a closet that had been made over 
into a room. There was just space enough 



in it for a folding bed, against the walk 
Well, what did Tiny ca.e? He'd findj| 
job. Of course he'd find oiie. Hadn't he 
always been able to find something to doB 
But what was this? This pain in his 
throat that was choking him, strangling 
him? That was making his head whin 
The heat of the city was reaching dH 
and touching him with poisonous tentacles 
Till it seemed as if his body were ablaftfl 
with the heat, as if it, too, were burning', 
up. 

He couldn't lie still on that cot. Noil 
while the pain came and clawed at his i 
throat this way. And he wanted to beg 
singer ! Heaven help him. how would ] 
be able to sing with that throat? 

He staggered out of bed and \vent.^| 
see a doctor. 

"My boy," said the doctor, "you've got 
diphtheretic throat. For heaven's sake, go. 
back to bed. Why, man, you're running 
around with a temperature of one hun- 
dred and four degrees.'' 

Back to bed Tiny went. Back to thai 
humid, sultry room. 

Carefully he counted his store of money. 
Six dollars for rent. Three dollars for the 
doctor. His prescription had taken a dol- 
lar and a half of his precious money. 
He'd have to get a job now! 

In a few days he went to see the per- 
( Continued on page 96) 




We knew you would want to see this new and charming picture of Ireene Wicker, 
the ever increasing popular Singing Lady, with her husband, Walter Wicker. 
These two have worked together successfully for years. They have two children. 



RADIO STARS 





Is hard to tell whether Ray Noble wants to strike up his band or a match! 
v ith cigarette clamped in his fingers, the famous maestro rehearses with 
i Bowlly, his vocal soloist. Al's singing and Ray's orchestra are tops! 

~Tke Jliltenell Jleaque (f alette 

(Continued from page 92) 



I N RAD THIBAULT, Chapter No. II: Marguerite West, 
!304 Silver St., Jacksonville, Fla.; Fred Angerholzer, 
[28 E. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla. ; Waxie Angerholzer, 
[28 E. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla. ; C. K. Batehelder, 

i 6130 St. Johns Ave., Jacksonville, Fla.; Mr. Beslem, 
jSeslem Studio. 5 West Duval St., Jacksonville, Fla. ; 
Mm. J. Bianco, 520 West 23rd St., Jacksonville, Fla. ; 
Mrs W. E. Bishop. 4005 Perry St., Jacksonville, Fla. : 
iVilliam Bonham, R.F.D. 2, Box 304, Jacksonville, 
Fla.: Evelyn Boote, Radio Station WJAX, Jacksonville. 
Fla. ; Mrs. Annie Circosta, 332fi Boulevard, Jacksonville, 
Fla.; Alice Coronas, 3402 Mayflower St.. Jacksonville, 
Fla.; Bill Deekler, 662 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, 
Fla.; Mrs. Fannie Dunning, 3547 Main St., Jackson- 
ville, Fla.; Gifford Grange, Radio Station WJAX, 
Jacksonville. Fla. ; Jack Martin, Radio Station WJAX, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Burl Moose. Jr., R.F.D. 2, Box 304, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Grace Moose, R.F.D. 2, Box 304, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Janet Moose. R.F.D. 2, Box 304. 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Joe Orlando, 11 E. Monroe St., 
Jacksonville. Fla.; Mrs. W. S. Salters. Route 2. Box 
307, Jacksonville, Fla.; Mrs. (Dr.) Rex Smith, 940 
Pearl St.. Jacksonville, Fla.; Mary Lou Taylor. 1629 
Laura St., Jacksonville. Fla.; Lannie West, 2304 Silver 
St.. Jacksonville, Fla. ; Robert Williams, R.F.D. 2. 
Box 304, Jacksonville, Fla. ; Dr. A. K. Wilson. St. 
James Building. Jacksonville, Fla. ; Miss Anna Zahn, 
128 East Bay St.. Jacksonville, Fla. 
)N RAD THIBAULT, Chapter No. Ill: Frieda Dittrich, 
233 Garfield Ave., Jersey City, N. .7. ; Kathleen A. Mer- 
rill, 28 Autumn, Bangor, Me.; Annie M. Scott, 4119 
Nebraska Ave., N. W„ Washington, D. C. ; Mae Elli- 
son, 105-18 Northern Blvd., Corona, N. Y. ; Lucille 
Yussim, 140 William St., New York, N. Y. : Pauline 
Augustine, 24 8'. Ann St., Baltimore. Md. • Miss Alice 
Kepfer. 414 Hickory St., Bethlehem. Pa. ; Elsie Taber, 
61 ClitT St.. Rosebank, Staten Island. N. Y. ; Eleona 
C. Mercy, 138 Shepard Ave., E. Orange. N. J.: Edna 
Goldberg. 2363 Valentine Ave., Bronx, N. Y. ; Bertha 

: Simpson, 12 Autumn St., Bangor, Me. 
ON RAD THIBAULT, Marconi: Miss Virginia Post, 
16 Woodlawn Ave., Parlin, N. J.; Dorella I'faefnir. 
426 Spruce St., Reading, Pa.; Beatrice LeTrello, 613 
Murtland Ave , Pittsburgh, Pa.; Alyce Carter, Box 2, 
Jefferson Co.. East Springfield, 0.; Mrs. Philip Koehler, 

■3 N. Grand Ave., Baldwin, L. I.; Emily Paaolucci, 146 
Minor St., New Haven, Conn. 

ING CROSBY, Chapter No. Ill: George White, 49 
St. Nicholas Ave., New York. N. Y. ; Sue M. Albizati, 
662 Boulevard. Bayonne. N. J.; Alberto A. Poch, 
Ceuallos 1159, Buenos Aires, Argentina; John J. Ref- 
ner, R.F.D. No. 4, Hillsdale. Mich.; Helen Ruth 
Keller, 2039 Stillwell St.. Lafayette. Ind. ; Louise 
Naclerio. 3216 Paulding Ave., Bronx. N. Y. ; Lora 
Kuehl. 314 Main St., Columbus, Wis.; Esther Kuehl, 
314 Main St., Columbus, Wis.; Florence M. Hoyt, Box 
414, Springdale, Conn.; Jimmie Smith. 210 Macouesten 
Pky., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. ; Attilio Marino, 125 Lexing- 
ton Ave., New York, N. Y. ; Don Marino, 125 Lexington 
Ave., New York. N. Y. 
IING CROSBY, Marconi: Miss Joan Rehnberg. c/0 
Camp Kohahna, R.F.D. 3, Maple City. Mich. ; Miss 
Augusta Brooks. R. D. 4, Honesdale, Pa. ; Miss Lois 
Carpenter. 323 E. 11th St., Davenport, la.; Omie Slater, 
713 N. Pitcher St. . -Kalamazoo, Mich.; Lupita Espinoza, 
P. O. Box 206, Duarte, Calif. ; Lorraine A. Giersch. 
2710 S. Hutchinson St., Philadelphia, Pa.: Mr. Ken- 
neth E. Butts, 629 Goodyear Ave., Buffalo. N. Y. ; Mr. 
Clarence G. Butts. 629 Goodyear Ave., Buffalo, N. Y.; 
Mr. George E. Butts. 629 Goodyear Ave., Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Mr. Lemoxne Cox. 1256 78th Ave., Oakland, 
Calif.: Lyle C. Bradley, 42-16 82nd St., Elmhurst, 
L. I., N. Y. ; William Pattno, River St., AuSabla 
Forks. N. Y. 

• LEN GRAY and his CASA LOMA BAND. Chapter No. 

I: Harry G. Hodson. 718 Cinnaminson Ave., Palmyra. 
N. J.; Lawrence Witte, 426 Thomas Ave., Riverton, 
N. J.; Joseph' F. Horhor, 631 Morgan Ave., Palmyra. 
N. J.: Edward L. McGinley, Jr., 21 Church Road. 
Merchantville, N.' Y. : Paul Chandler, 724 Pennsyl- 
vania Ave.. Palmyra. N. J.; John Faunce, 801 Cinna- 
inlnsoa Ave., Palmyra. N: J. ; Joseph Nanni. 516 Cinna- 



minson Ave., Palmyra. N. J.; Norman DeLaney, 512 
Thomas Ave., Riverton. N. J.: George W. Beddow, 
506 \V. Broad St., Palmyra, N. J.; Don Powell, 101 
Memorial Ave., Palmyra, N. J. 

VERA VAN, Chapter No. I (additional new members): 
Myrtle Quigley, 29 William St.. Amityville, N. Y. ; 
Paul Leonard, 21 W. Main, Tremont, Pa. ; Helen Ruth 
Keller, 2039 Stillwell St., Lafayette, Ind.; Miss Ruth 
Lund, 7 Satucket Way, Worcester, Mass.; Dorothy 
Hulse, 3322 Wilson Ave., New York, N. Y. ; Meta 
Waltman, 269 Meade Ave., Hanover, Pa. 

LANNY ROSS & MURIEL WILSON, Chapter No. I 
Jo Jaskiewicz, 606 E. 14th St., New York, N. Y. 
Cecilia Stegman. 951 E. 179th St., Bronx, N. Y. 
Helen Komiaga, 428 E. 16th St.. New York. N. Y 
Jenny Bacza, 645 E. 12th St.. New York, N. Y. ; Wanda 
Stachowicz, 212 Avenue B. New York, N. Y. ; Stella 
Rene, 607 E. 11th St., New York. N. Y. ; Helen 
Kasper. 130 E. 3rd St., New York, N. Y. ; Winifred 
Bleier. 2395 Morris Ave., Bronx, N. Y. ; Helen Jaskie- 
wicz, 606 E. 14th St.. New York, N. Y. ; May Kuzow, 
428 E. 16th St., New York, N. Y. ; Blanche Stegman, 
9d1 E. 179th St., Bronx. N. Y. ; Helen Glinska. 94 E. 
7th St., New York, N. Y. ; Genevieve Komiaga, 428 
E. 16th St., New York, N. Y. ; Helen Goralczyk. 98 E 
8th St.. New York, N. Y. 

LANNY ROSS, Chapter No. VII: Mrs. Sarah Ann Nel- 
son, S29 Forest Ave., Highland Park, 111.; R. E. Swartz. 
19 S. LaSalle, Chicago, 111.; R. L. Nelson, 829 Forest 
Ave., Highland Park, 111.; Mrs. Sarah A. Nelson. 829 
Forest Ave., Highland Park. 111.; Mrs. N. Hoag, 566 
Do Tamble Ave., Highland Park, 111.; Mrs. A V 
McPhee, 832 Forest Ave., Highland Park. HI.; Mrs. 
Max Wallace. 101 Hillcrest Rd.. Highland Park. 111.; 
™ rs - P- ^ ustin . Do Tamble Ave., Highland Park. 
111. : Maria B. Harrmann, 835 Forest Ave., Highland 
Park, 111. ; Viggo Larsen, 5959 Kenmore Ave., Chicago, 
111 ; Norman Hover, 566 De Tample Ave.. Highland 
Park. 111. 

LANNY ROSS, Marconi: Miss Helen Benson, 1006 State 
street Utica. N. Y. ; Miss Dorothy Boetticher, 27013 
East Oviatt Rd., Bay Village, O. ; Miss Rose Mugno, 
46 Carpenter Ave.. Lynbrook, N. Y. ; Jacqueline 
Schwarz, 44o Melrose St., Chicago, 111.; Miss K 
Oliver. 3693 Eveline St., Philadelphia, Pa.; Helen 
Sodafsky, 296 Bellevue St.. Hartford, Conn. : Elizabeth 
tvlooster, 4236 Athlene Ave., St. Louis, Mo.; Miss 
Marian McClow, 909 Roanoke Ave., Hillside N J ■ 
Betty Avers 940 Ella Court, Akron, O.; Eleanor Hoi- 
felder. lOal W. 22nd St., Lorain, O. : Elizabeth E. 
Brown, 490 Port Washington Blvd., Port Washington, 
N. Y.; Helen Spergel, 942 Theodore St., Detroit, Mich ; 
Anna Turanica. 647 Woodward St.. Allentown Pa • 
. \^ V - <£; , Dav A es ' 107 Anderbon Rd., Milton, 
Mass.; Miss Shirley Green, 2180 Holland Ave., Bronx 
fe;»t ; T> Kutl V>¥t Walters. 1007 Prospect Ave., Melrose 
Park, p a . : Catherine E. Prescott. R.F.D. No. 1, No. 
Wilbraham Mass.; Marian Buckley, Kathwill. Tarry- 
town N. Y : Irving G. Varmush, 1389 St. John's Pi., 
Brooklyn. N. Y. ; Helen M. Udiljak, Red Hook. N. Y • 

n £m i Tena ?i s A°^. Smlth Strcet - Seekonk, Mass. 
R. Gittelman. 1115 East 165th St., New York, N. Y 

Rnr tt ^ 0 „ SI ? rr ' d -. a ?' W ? l .' S3eU A,e - S'- Catharines 
s? '<£?, n /! da: v£ l1 ?. 9 P»t«cia Oslnger, 1845 North 51st 
St Seattle Wash.: Ruth Foerst. 1414 Walnut St., 
Columbia, Mo.; Do Lora M. Stickney, Emerson. Aloen 
w n : I J, a . nces , M - Wilson. R. R. 1. Box 99. Nashua, 
w £ ' tA Iis3 Ar A en9 Gielen. Peldale Apts., Pelham, 
£ • • \, Elean ,2 r Mea Sher, 5465 Euclid Ave.. Philadel- 
T&J 8 * %ft» ?\ r r b - ad \r Clark V R a"*o Clarorton, Fall 
Brook Calif. ; Miss Mane Jacobelli, 1132 N. Tacoma 
Ave.. Indianapolis, Ind.; Miss Edna Proctor. 701 Gil- 
S er TSkJ^ e "« lle ' T 5?-V H urel OIson ' 2 Denmark St., 
& ^ ass 4, Ruth , A ' ram - 12 5 Highland Ave. 

Ft. Thomas. Ky. ; Marjorie Boettcher, 38 North Clare- 
mont St.. San Mateo. Calif.; Carol Boettcher 38 N 
Claremont. Can Mateo Calif. ! Mrs. cforge A Chapm! 
138 Bridgeport Ave., Devon, Conn.; Mrs. J. A Harril 
Jr.. 850 Pryor St. S. W., Atlanta, G a. • Miss Jean 
Freeland, 3698 E. 163rd St., Cleveland. 6. ; Mra. u! 

(Continued on page 97) 




«T THOUGHT I'd go mad with the suffering I 
had to bear in secret!" 
That's the situation of the person who suffers 
from Piles! 

Almost always in pain yet dreading to seek 
relief, because the affliction is such a delicate one. 
Yet no ailment is more needful of treatment than 
Piles. For Piles can not only ruin your health and 
looks, but they can develop into something very 
serious. 

Real relief for the distress due to Piles is to be had 
in Pazo Ointment! Pazo almost instantly stops the 
pain and itching and checks any bleeding. 

Pazo is effective because it is threefold in effect. 
First, soothing, which tends to relieve soreness and 
inflammation. Second, lubricating, which eases drawn 
parts and makes passage easy. Third, astringent, 
which tends to reduce swollen parts. 

REAL COMFORT I 

Try Pazo and see how efficacious it is! Pazo comes 
in Collapsible Tube with Detachable Pile Pipe which 
permits application high up in the rectum where it 
reaches and thoroughly covers affected parts. Pazo 
also now comes in suppository form. Pazo Supposi- 
tories are Pazo Ointment, simply in suppository 
form. Those who prefer suppositories will find Pazo 
the most satisfactory as well as most economical. 

AH drug stores sell Pazo-in-Tubes and Pazo Sun- 
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affords you. 

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Accountant 

Erecutiv© Accountants ud C. P. A.*i earn $3,000 to $15,000 a year. 
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Women, girls, men with gray , faded, streaked hair. Shampoo 
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Name.'. 

City State 

95 



RADIO STARS 




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BROWNATONE is only 50o — at all drug and toilet 
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due to MOTHERHOOD 

Having a baby puts a terrible strain on 
a woman's back muscles . . . frequently 
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Draws the blood to the painful spot . . . shoulder, 
back, hips, arms, legs. Pain stops quickly. Allcock's 
is the original porous plaster . . . take nothing else. 
Lasts long, comes off easy. Also excellent for chest 
colds. 254 at druggists or write 
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ALLCOCK'S 



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Photo of myself after 
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Address.. 
City 




The "Grand Old Opry" program received Radio Stars Magazine's award 
for distinguished service to radio this month. Here is Mr*. J. Percy Priest, 
holding the medal, with the "Solemn Old Judge" on the other side of 
the microphone. The Judge is holding under his arm "Hushpuckena," 
the famous steamship whistle. Behind Mr. Priest is Manager Harry 
Stone. The other man is Uncle Dave Mason, seventy-year-old star of 
this increasingly popular program. 



(Continued from page 94) 



sonncl director of the B. Altman Company. 
And what a story he told him ! Tiny said 
that he owned a department store out 
West, and had come to New York to find 
out about business methods in the East. 
He wanted a job where he could work in- 
cognito, but at the same time observe 
everything that was going on. They gave 
him a job as floor manager of the boys' 
clothing department. 

Daytimes he worked as floor manager. 
In the evenings he took voice lessons. And 
this went on for nine months. 

Everything was going smoothly now. He 
was earning a nice salary. He'd saved 
some money. And then he fell madly in 
love, and threw everything overboard for 
a Castilian blonde, a beautiful Spanish 
dancer. When she left New York, he 
chucked his job and followed her. To At- 
lantic City, to Philadelphia. Wherever she 
went on tour, Tiny went, too. 

Five years older than he. she smiled 
wisely at his mad infatuation. At which 
it only grew madder. 

A dozen times a day he begged her to 
marry him. But she shook her head. 

She was used to men who could wine 
and dine her, so Tiny wined and dined 
her. Tiny bought her caviar and cham- 
pagne. He took her to night clubs, and 
sumptuously entertained her and her 
friends. When other men were in the 



party, they saw that Tiny was beni 
making a conquest, so they left him hot 
ing the check. Finally he threw a hugi 
party lor her at a leading hotel. H< 
wound up owing the hotel eleven dollar: 
more than he had in the world. He had r 
return ticket for New York, so he sneaktt 
out in the morning, checking his grip out- 
side. 

But the girl never said "yes." She nevaj 
even said "perhaps.'' And later she mar- 
ried another man. 

Back in New York Tiny found himsdfl 
completely broke. And with no job. Fm 
two days he had nothing to eat. He wd| 
around with an empty, sinking sensatioi 
in his stomach. It even got to the poin 
where he looked hungrily at bakery win] 
dows, wondering if he could get up nervi 1 
enough to steal a loaf of bread. 

And then finally he got a job driving 
an ice truck. He had to get up at t^j 
o'clock every morning, but he was througl 
at eleven, so he didn't care. Now he ha« 
plenty of time for his singing lessons. I 

Eventually he got his chance on M 
stage. Singing in an operetta, "PrincJ 
Flavia," and in other operettas for tfl 
Shubferts. While he was on the stage, M 
met Alois Havrilla. When Havrilla joinw 
the NBC staff, he advised Tiny Ruffrp 
to join, too. Tiny got a job as stall an 
(Continued on faijc 9S) 



96 



RADIO STARS 



one momnn s 




Kola was the sensation of the season 
at Monte Carlo, with her dancing 
partner, Toni, whom she loved so 
much that she was marrying an- 
other man to" save him! 

One evening Toni came into Kola's 
dressing room after their dance. He 
was pale and worried, and told her 
he needed fifty thousand francs to 
pay a gambling debt. Taking Kola 
roughly by the shoulders he de- 
manded that she borrow the money 
from Garet, the rich American who 
was in love with her, telling her it 
was the only way to save them 
from disgrace. Kola was in despair 
... if she could only think of some 
other way out. . . . She sank down 
for a moment, holding her pounding 
head in her hands ... "I will not 
ask Garet for money. I cannot," 
she whispered over and over again. 
What tragedy threatened these two? 

What strange destiny awaited this 
young American girl, caught in a 
web of intrigue and desperate love? 



JQead "lovers 

ARE RICH!" A Com- 
plete Short Novel by 
Vina Lawrence 

SUIEETHEHRI 
STORIES 

November issue now on sale — 10c 



~Tke JZiltenet* 

(Continued from page 95) 



Sullivan. 55 Central St.. Gardner. Mass.; Karra Schu- 
bert, c/o Dr. Geo. H. Schubert, 2315 So. ISth St., St. 
Petersburg. Fla.: Mrs. Elizabeth Smith. R. 4. B"x 
439, Overland, Mo.; .Miss Alice Mitchell, 1S16 N. 
Springfield Ave.. Chicago, 111.; Helen I. Qroh, 541 
Cumberland St.. Lebanon, Pa. ; Miss Carole Schleycr, 
182 Gay St.. Philadelphia, Pa.: Benlah M. Johnson, 
257 W. 5th St.. Jacksonville, Fla.; Ruth Kellar. 35 
Halstead St.. Newark, N. J.; Miss Helen Arthur, 28 
Ixwan St., Laurence, Mass.; Ann Brown, 1306 Forest 
Rd.. Sparrow's Point, Md. ; Miss Elmo Booth. Harri- 
son County. Calnsville. Mo.; Albena Dominiytis, ti48 
Broadway, McKcc's Rocks, Pa.; Jcannctte Delia Monica, 
1S2 15th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Norma G. Fox, White 
Pond Road. Concord. Mass. ; Alberta Daniels, Pearl 
Hill Rd., Fltehburg, Mass.: Anna Bernich, 431 E. 144th 
St.. The Bronx, N. Y. ; Ruth E. Johnson. 71-15 3rd 
Ave., Brooklyn. N. Y. ; Miss Cathryn Castle, 246 S. 
Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif.; Miss Ruth Thompson. 
Grand Crossing, Fla. : Bessie Smith, c/o Mr. Samuel 
Smith. Durt'ee Hill, Waterford, Conn.: Delia E. Bur- 
baker. Box 26, Etters, Pa. : Miss Edith Doolcy. 43 W. 
Mt. Airy Ave. Philadelphia. Pa.; Belle Miller. 708 
Front St., Evanston, Wyo. ; Mrs. H. Zobbi, 503 Mills 
St., Benton. Wash. ; Mary Jane Muscatel, 33 Clinton 
Ave.. Lambertville. N. J.; Ida Mae Stangle, 266 North 
Union St., Lambertville, N. J.; Vyvyann Bisenberg, 
2100 Anthony Ave.. New York City, N. Y. ; Mildred 
I. Wachter, Oakville, Pa. ; Helen J. Groh, 541 Cum- 
berland St., Lebanon. Pa.; Josephine Anderson, West- 
brook, Minn.: Marguerite O'Brien. 679 Canterbury St., 
Roslindale. Mass. 

MURIEL WILSON. Marconi: C. Connor, 406 Elm, 
Buffalo. N. Y. 

NELSON EDDY, Chapter No. II: Miss Bub Clough. 56 
W. 105th St.. New York. N. Y. ; Mrs. Winifred 
Tierney, 94 Hamilton Place New York, N. Y. ; John 
Tiemey, 94 Hamilton Place. New York, N. Y. : Miss 
Corinne Clough. 56 W. 105th St.,. New York, N. Y. ; 
Miss P. Clough. 56 W. 105th St., New York. N. Y. ; 
Miss Janet Coggshell, c/o Livingstone, 56> W. 105th 
St., New York, N. Y. : Mrs. A. Livingstone. 56 W. 105th 
St.. New York, N. Y. ; Mr.'. Fred J. White. 56 W. 
105th St.. New York. N. Y. : Miss Patricia Mayer, 
201 W. 109th St., New York, N. Y. ; Mr. Karl Clough. 
56 W. 105th St., New York. N. Y. 

NELSON EDDY, Chapter No. Ill: Miss Bub Clough, 
56 W. 105th St., New York, N. Y. ; William R. Traum, 
Chadwick. 111.: Eve Smith. Route 2. Eugene, Ore.; 
Grace Fowler, MoodUS, Conn. J E. E." Dowling, il Bel- 
mont Rd., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. ; Capt. William Barton. 
Whitby. Yorkshire, England: Miss Ruth Thorner.- 1031 
N. Edgemont St., Los Angeles, Calif.; Miss Beatrice 
Garr, 56 Park St., Taunton, Mass.; Miss M.' Ranison, 
Cross Roads, Jamaica, L. I./N. Y. ; Miss Annie Throp, 
Sawyer's Bay, Dunedin, New Zealand; Miss Fleurette 
Murad 552 E. 29th St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

NELSON EDDY. Chapter No. IV: Miss Victoria Mason. 
913 W. 29th St.. Wilmington, Del.; Miss Jean Young, 
1357 Howard St.. Harrisburg, Pa.: Miss Maxine Ash- 
craft, c/o Sirs. D. R. Paterson, Randle, Wash.: Con- 
stance Bridere, 417 Washington St.. Brookline. Mass.; 
Josephine W. Lowry,- 2200 Harrison St., Wilmington, 
Del. : Isabel Clough, 56 W. 105tb St., New York City, 
N. Y. ; Lillian Graber. 242 Floyd St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
Natalie B. Taylor, 2610 University Ave.. Bronx. N. Y. ; 
Miss Marian Elam, 1006 Olive St., Santa Barbara, 
Calif.: Cecil Smith, Pines-on-Severn, - Arnold, Md. ; 
Anne Cantv. 54 Harvard Ave.. Brookline. Mass. 

NELSON EDDY, Marconi: Helen Dodd. Mitchell Field, 
Hempstead, N. Y. ; Irene Ziplow. 24 Suffleld St., Hart- 
ford, Conn. ; Miss Rosalind Chadwin, 1473 Popham 
Ave., New York. N. Y. ; Geraldine Calligan, 83 Put- 
nam St.. E, Weymouth. Mass.: Doris Herring. 5103 
Capitol Ave.. Omaha, Neb.; Kathryn VanKirk, 632 S. 
2Sth St?, Omaha, Neb.; Jerry Costa. 9 Sewell St.. 
Wallaston. Mass.; Laura W. Sale, 1145 Luliwater Rd., 
N.E., Atlanta, Ga. ; Dorothea Dawson, 29 Madison St., 
Brooklyn. N. Y. : Muriel Sthiles.- 104 W. Foothill 
Blvd.. La Verne, Calif.; Miss Margaret Pivarnik, 137 
Wardwell St., Stamford, Conn.: Marion F. Harmon, 
42 Waverly St., Portland, Me.: Jean De Wolfe. 316 
Baltimore Rd.. Winnipeg, Canada. 

IRENE BEASLEY, Chapter No. I: Alma D. Lang, 20 
Andrew St., Maiden, Mass.; Mrs. Gladys Fogelsonger. 
1011- Taylor St., Bay City. Mich.: Mrs. C. Watkins. 
116 BelvalesS't.. Maiden. Mass.; Mrs. Doris Lima. 64 
Dartmuth St., Somerville. Mass.: Miss Gladys Merath, 
3454 N. 2nd St.. Milwaukee Wis.; Mrs. Viola Cole, 
1011' Taylor St., Bay City, Mich. : Miss - Anna' Clark. 
12 ' Andrew, St;, Maiden. 1 Mass.; Mrs. Adeline Harson, 
8- Twilight Path. E. Weymouth,. Mass.; Mrs' Esther 
Maguire, 27' Andrew St.. Maiden.- Mass.; Miss Marion 
Burleigh. 65 Ashland Ave., Medford. Mass.; Miss Mary 
Brett, 144 Cambridge St., Gait. Ontario. Canada. 

IRENE BEASLEY, Marconi: Helen Penley, Candler, 
N: C. 

LUM & ABNER, Chapter No. I: George T. Colman, 615 
Cleveland i Ave.. Racine.- Wis. ; Betty J. Maroda. 2523 
Geneva Sftv Racine, Wis. ; Mr. Kenro Williams. Hotel 
Racine, 527 S. Main St. . Racine. Wis. ; Miss Rose M. 
Johnson,' Apt.' 201, 1924' S. Main St.. Racine. . Wis. ; 
Mr. Charles Exug, 1729 Erie St.-. Racine. Wis. : Viola 
Goedeke. 420 Romayne Ave., Racine,. Wis.; I»uise M. 
Jorgenson. 1415 W. 6th St.; Racine, Wis.; Mr. C. E. 
Yates. 1505 Thurston Ave., Racine. Wis.; Miss Mabel 
M. Fox. Northwestern Ave.. Rarine, Wis.: Marjnrie 
Williams, 915 Albert St.. Racine. Wis.; Mr. A. H. 
Barnes. 1424 Main St.. Racine, Wis. 

STUART HAMBLEN, Chapter No. I: Mrs. Ruth Proc- 
tor. R.F.D. 552. Richmond. Calif.; Esta Garrison, 1340 
Rose St, Berkeley, Calif; Mr. Lou Sterling, 12024 
Addison St., N. Hollywood, Calif.: Paul Elick. Box 
364. Dos Palos. Calif. : Mildred E. Brown, 2535 Union 
St.. San Francisco. Calif.: Doug. Montell. KLX, Oak- 
land, Calif.; Marie Creushan, 112S W. Sanderson St.. 
Wilmington, Calif.; Leona Fall. 119 So. Valencia, 
Burbank, Calif.; Earl M. Root. 1340 Rose St.. Berke- 
ley. Calif.: Mrs. Esta Garrison 1340 Rose St.. Berkeley, 
Calif.: Blanche Burg. Box 263, Richmond, Calif. 

RUDY VALLEE. Chapter No. Ill (additional new mem- 
bers): (President: Beatrice Gordon. Lefferts Station, 
Brooklyn.) Evelyn Tedrahn, Box 101. Cloverdale, 111.; 
E. J. Duistermars, General Delivery, Orange City, 
la.: Agnes Gearhart. 1746 Arlington Ave., Toledo. Q ; 
Berta Mae Busch, 2408 West Mayfleld St. Philedalphia. 
Pa.; Sallie Barrett, R.F.D. No. 2, Putnam. Conn. 

RUDY VALLEE, Marconi: Delia Peters. Palm Springs, 
Calif.: Anne Dempsey, 1412 State St.. Bridgeport. 
Conn. 

(Continued on page 99) 



IN-A-B C 




Art a Aeaij/unc 




EASY 
OPENER 



Griffin Manufacturing Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"A\0 IN 12 WEEKS 



FY 
f f^\M P "^BY SHOP WORK-NOT BY BOOKS 
[ ^^I'll Finance Your Training! 
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~ etc., by 12 weeks practical shop work in Coyne 
Shops. Free Employment Service. Many earn while 
learning. Write for BIG FREE RADIO and TELEVISION) 
BOOK, and my "Pay-Tuition-Affter- Graduation" Plan. 
H. C. LEWIS, President, COYNE RADIO SCHOOL 
600 S. Paulina St.. Dept. 85-6E. Chicago, Illinois 

BUNIONS 

J Torture Needless 

fPain stops almost instantly. The swell- 
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WORK FOR THE 





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Mail Coupon / 

"l oday — , Haunt 

SURE / 

/ Address 

97 



RADIO STARS 



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FIRESIDE INDUSTRIES 
Dept. 147 S, Adrian, Mich. 




Lum and Abner, proprietors of "The Jot 'em Down Store" of mythical Pine 
Ridge, have returned to the air with their nationally popular radio serial. 
Lum (Chester Lauk) is the gentleman with the moustache at the left, and Abner 
[Norris Goff) right. Lum is Justice of the Peace, Abner is Town Marshal. 



(Continued from page 96) 



nouncer, then as chief announcer, and 
finally after two years he was made studio 
director. 

Now it really looked as if Lady Luck 
had kissed Tiny on both cheeks. Until 
Tiny once more leaped before he looked. 
He was offered a job as sales manager of 
the Judson Radio Corporation, at that time 
a rival of NBC. 

When Tiny told his boss at NBC that 
he was leaving, the man was angry. 

"If you go with that outfit," he said, 
"you're washed up here." 

Tiny had a chance to make twice as 
much with the new company. Or to lose 
everything, since it was a smaller com- 
pany, with less money than NBC. In two 
years' time the Judson Radio Corporation 
ceased to exist. Tiny found himself out 
on his ear. 

But he bad made some good contacts 
with advertising agencies. When the Jud- 
son Company folded up, he got a job as 
head of radio production with Erwin Wasey. 
And later a chance with Benton & Bowles. 
While handling the General Foods ac- 



count Tiny Ruffner became interested in 
a showboat program known as "The Cot- 
ton Queen," in Cincinnati. When Chet 
Bowles later got his idea of a national 
showboat program, Tiny and Atherton W. 
Hobler told him how beautifully the idea 
had worked on a local station. Tiny 
worked out a formula for Showboat and 
did the casting. The idea for the Palm- 
olive show was mostly his. And now he 
stands aces high in the radio world. Be- 
cause he always leaped before be looked. 

He's happily married to a singer who 
gave up her career for him, Florence 
Kowalewska. But his wife never knows 
what Tiny will do next. I doubt if Tiny 
himself knows. But she does know that 
whatever he does, he will go at it with 
blazing disregard for consequences. Like 
a man, not a jellyfish. 

Undoubtedly he'll still do some mad, up- 
roarious things. And somehow, I feel, 
he'll come out on top, while the jellyfish 
stay just where they belong, under several 
feet of water. 

The End 



98 



RADIO STARS 



"The /ZidteneU * 
Jleajue alette 

(Continued from page 97) 



FRANK PARKER, Marconi: Mally Rips,-, General De- 
livery, Alexandria, Va. ; Audrey Deutseh, 281 3 Crnjixey 
Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Grace Rogers, 631 Sea St.. 
(luinry, Mass.; Jules Hoyre, 212 Northern Ave.. 2\"o. 3, 
Cincinnati, O. ; Miss Helen Cook. 530 Grove Ave.. 
Cuyahoca Falls, O. : Miss Marie Miller, 3919 W. 160th 
St.. Cleveland, O. : Alice Muskalski, 62 Newton St., 
Somervillo, Mass. ; Miss Jerry MoUaniel, 1000 8th Ave., 
Fort Worth. Texas; Mi - . H. Itaacke, 227 South Colum- 
bus Ave., Jit. Vernon, N. Y. ; Jean Holke, o39 Division 
St.. Barrinston. III.; Esther Waldman, 4041 Polk St., 
Chicago, 111.: Jayne Phillipps, 3343 Warner Ave.. Chi- 
rago. 111.: Rita Barrett, 607 Hich St., Middletowri. 
Conn.; Mary Gillen, 60 Clark St.. Hillside, N. J.I 
Miss Maileleine Duciiarme, 4S6 Bernon St., Woonsocket, 
II. I.: Jacqueline Speece, 41-24 77th St., Jackson 
Heights, N. Y. ; Miss Beverly Merritt, 2622 Honian 
Ave., Waco. Texas: Louise O'Meara, Box 303, La- 
Marnue, Texas; Beatrice Le Trello, 613 Murtland Ave.. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Miss Emily Barry, 734 Monroe St., 
Strotulsburg, Pa. 

SMILIN' ED McCONNELL, Marconi: Hugh William- 
son. 49 Majestic Ave., West Asheville. N. C. 

ETHEL SHUTTA, Marconi: Erna jSchulze. 13404 West 
Ave., Cleveland, O. ; Esther Petersen, SOI 30th Ave., 
So.. Seattle. Wash. 

MARY SMALL, Marconi: Marions L. Armstrong, 719 
N. Williams Ave., Hastings, Neb. 

FRED WARING, Marconi: Robert Elder, SI Gibbs St., 
New Haven, Conn. 

NEIL BUCKLEY, Marconi: Miss Joan Cooper, 3S But- 
man St., Beverly, Mass.: Alfhild Blomdal. 45 Sher- 
brooke Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

DON AMECHE, Marconi: Florence Barbanera, 624 E. 
220th St.. New York, N. Y. 

ERNO RAPEE, Marconi: Frank George, 1300 E. 1st St., 
Austin, Texas. 

JESSICA DRAGONETTE. Marconi: W. Hester, Herman 
Kiefer Hospital. Detroit. Mich. 

AMOS 'N' ANDY, Marconi: Miss Ruth Reed, 70 Wil- 
siiore Drive, Phoenix, Arizona. 

AL JOLSON, Marconi: Geraldine Sullivan, 93 Winter 
St., Saugus, Mass. 

HAL KEMP, Marconi: Mr. Ray R. Fitch, 49 Svramore 
St., Belmont. Mass.; Onie Slater, 713 N. Pitcher St., 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

ROBERT ROYCE, Marconi: Mrs. Clara Jensen, 444 East 
Michigan St.. Marquette, Mich. 

MEREDITH WILSON, Marconi: Nelson Gutteridge, 
Demdney. B. C. Canada (may be Deuidney). 

DICK POWELL, Marconi: Miss Mathison, 155-101156 
Drive. New York, N. Y. ; W. A. Srhielke, 6S35 Emer- 
ald Ave., Chicago, 111. ; Miss Betty Strong, Brighton 
station, Box A, Rochester, N. Y. ; Mildred Brown. 
Route 6. Box 71, Roanoke Va. 

1ERRY COOPER, Marconi: Miss Helen Stanley, Law 
St., Darlington, S. C. 

WALTER O'KEEFE, Marconi : Miss Dorothy Sperry, 502 
So. 12th St., Lincoln, Neb. 

JAN PEERCE, Marconi: Beatrice Le Trello, 613 Murt- 
land Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WAYNE KING, Marconi: Thelma Chadburn, R. F. D. 1, 
Lisbon Falls, Me. 

BEN BERNIE, Marconi: Kenn Doan, 9 Grenadier Gar- 
dens, Toronto, Canada. 

FRANK MUNN, Marconi: Galen D. Whiting, 30 Hemen- 
uay St., Boston, Mass. 

EDDIE DUCHIN. Marconi: Jack Young, Modern Ave., 
Carnegie, Pa.: May Brose. R.F.D. 2. Ehineheck, N. Y. ; 
Betty Rae Bull, 11 Ridgeside Road, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

"UNCLE" JIM HARKINS, Marconi: Helen Benson, 
I'nion St.. Thomaston, Conn. 

DONALD NO VIS, Marconi: Lucille M. Sayles, 2309 Nina 
St.. Pasadena, Calif. 

BARRY McKINLEY, Marconi: June Kriipp, 2S11 Taylor 
St.. N. E. . Minneapolis. Minn. 

NINO MARTINI, Marconi: Georgia Biggar, 12S6 E 17th 
Ave., Vancouver, Canada: Dorothy Lipscombe, 364 17th 
Ave., East. Vancouver, Canada. 

FRANCIA WHITE, Marconi: Don F. Nelson, 2906 Ham- 
ilton, Omaha. Neb. 

02 l ? IE , NE .!- S P N - HARRIET MILLIARD, Marconi: Claude 

Beard. Marble Hill. Ga. 
IREENE WICKER, Marconi: Mrs. Evelyn Nyman, R FD 

Box 98, Gardner. Mass. 
LI I TL . E JACK LITTLE. Marconi: George Ludwig, 1S40 

E. Monmouth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
AL KAVELIN, Marconi: Charlotte Bierbower 1215 W 

5th St., Hastings, Neb. 
JACK BENNY, Marconi: Samuel Colangeld, 414 Roberats 

St.. Rome. N. Y. 
FRED ALLEN, Marconi: Howard S. Ross. 12 Short St . 

Brooklme, Mass.: Miss Kathryn Sheedy, Canterbury, 

<>■: Emerson Davies, Columbiana. O 
BRADLEY KINCAID, Marconi: Lloyd .Taquay, 311 Page 

Ave., Union. N. Y. 
GUY LOMBARDO, Marconi: Masao Masuo, Chapel St. 

Lahaina, Maui. Hawaii. 

West' ° R j|T°\ V Marconi: Mary Throon. Box 439, R. R. 4, 
A *! NE T TE . HANSHAW. Marconi: Miss Jane Hogben. 41 
tAPU RCu T iS v T M y ' Y. ; Alvin Falrh. Meadville. Mo. 
JACK BENNY, Marconi: Miss Grace Gillespie, 1315 N. 

Church St., Salem, Ore.; Sydelle Wasserman, 707 Park 

Aye., Union City, N. J.; Julius Paolucci, 146 Minor 

bt.. New Haven, Conn. 



MAY I respectfully request that in 
filling out the application blanks 
you make use of a pencil and print 
plainly. It will be your assurance 
that your membership card will be 
filled out correctly. Applications 
written with pen are apt to be 
blurred. 




Mi 



The publishers of RADIO STARS guarantee that you will 
be satisfied with your purchase of every packaged product 
advertised in this magazine. If for any reason you are 
dissatisfied, RADIO stars will replace the product or, if 
you prefer, refund your purchase price. In either case all you 
have to do is to send us the unused portion, accompanied 
by a letter outlining your complaint. This guarantee also 
applies if the product, in your opinion does not justify 
the claims made in its advertising in radio stars 




Careful examination before publication and rigid censorship, 
plus our guarantee, enable you to buy with complete confidence 
the products you see advertised in this issue of RADIO STARS. 



IndBH of Hduertisers 



A/ovemltat 1935 



PAGE 

Allcock's Plasters 96 

Barbo Compound 89 

Blondex 90 

Blue Waltz Cosmetics 87 

Borden Company, The 85 

Brownatone 96 

Camay Soap 13 

Camel Cigarettes Insert 

Chamberlain's Lotion 91 

Cheramy 70 

Chesterfield Cigarettes. 4th Cover 

Chieftain Colorshine 89 

Chicago School of Nursing 88 

Chore Girl 84 

Clopay Shades 75 

Coyne Electrical School 97 

Crosley Radios 86 

Denison, T. S 82 

D. D. D. Corporation 96 

Dr. Pierre Chemical Company 72 

Dr. Scholl's Zino Pads 89 

Enterprise Dripolator 84 

Ex Lax 11 

Faoen Cosmetics 76 

Farr's For Gray Hair 98 

Feenamint 4 

Fels Naptha Soap 9 

Fireside Industries 98 

Fleischmann's Yeast 55 

Fletcher's Castoria 65 

Franco-American Spaghetti 59 

Franklin Institute 98 

Free Breath Products Co 91 

Gayanne Puffs 92 

Gerber's Strained Vegetables 64 

Griffin Shoe Dye 82 

Griffin Shoe Polish 97 

Grove's Bromo Quinine 68 

Hess Hand Lotion 80 

Hollywood Rapid Dry Curlers 93 

Hubinger Elastic Starch 84 

Hush Company 98 

Indera Mills 80 

Institute of Applied Science 95 

International Typewriter Exchange 94 

Ironized Yeast 81 

Irresistible Cosmetics 3rd Cover 

Justrite Push Clips 88 

Kalamazoo Stoves 82 

Kellogg Company, The 57 

Kleerplex 91 

Kleinert Rubber Shields 63 

Kool Cigarettes 56 

Kurlash Company 74 



PAGE 

Lady Esther Cosmetics 69 

Lander Talcum Powders 92 

Lanzette. Annette 98 

Larkin Company 92 

La Salle Extension University 82 

La Salle Extension University 95 

Lavena Cosmetics 80 

Leonard Company, A. 0 94 

Lever Brothers Corporation 

Lux Toilet Soap 3 

Rinso 71 

Lewis Hotel Training Schools 95 

Little Blue Books 84 

Lux Toilet Soap .3 

McCormick's Iron Glue 90 

Magic Chord Company 86 

Mahler Company, D.J 94 , 

Maybelline Company, The 62 

Mehl. B. Max 90 ■ 

Mercolized Wax 94 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures 5 

Midol 77 

Midwest Radio Corporation 7 

National Academy of Music 94 

National Jewelry Co 94 

Nestle Colorinse 93 

Northwestern Yeast Company 67 

Noxzema 79 

Olive Tablets 88 

Palmer, Pauline 95 

Pazo Ointment 95 

Pedodyne Company 97 

Perfect Voice Institute 94 

Pond's Creams 53 

Pond's Powders 61 

Procter & Gamble Co., Camay 13 

Remington Rand Corporation 86 

Rinso 71 I 

Rit Products Corp 58 

Savage Cosmetics 3rd Cover I 

Sergeant's Dog Medicine 78 

Smith-Corona Typewriters 78 

Standard Art Studios 91 

Stebbing System 96 

Tangee Cosmetics 66 

Tempt Lipstick 86 

Thymolac Toothpaste 86 

Turns 87 

Valligny. Pierre 95 

Way Company. The 96 

Winx 73 

Zonite Corporation, The 60 



Although we make every effort to insure the accuracy of this index, we take no responsibility 
for an occasional omission or inadvertent error. 

99 



Hast Hiikuie Hews JUei 



Snatched from the camera 
as the book goes to press! 



Below, an exclusive shot of Messrs. [left to right) 
Orville Knapp, Jan Garber, Eddie Duchin and 
Jimmy Grier, plotting new music at Sardi's. Right, 
two popular favorites of the Swift program, Mor- 
ton Bowes, tenor; and Helen Marshall, soprano. 
Next below, three noted film players who presented 
over the radio scenes from their picture, "China 
Seas", Rosalind Russell, Clark Gable, Jean Harlow. 
Lower right, Paul Whiteman, Mrs. Paul, and Bing 
Crosby have a grand time reminiscing at Saratoga. 
It was Paul, you know, who gave Bing his start. 
Lower left, George Burns, Gracie Allen, and their 
adopted daughter, Sandra. They thought of getting 
a playmate for Sandra, but "just couldn't find any- 
thing to match her," Gracie justifiably states. 





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"PINK TO 

A MAN'S first swift dingy 
look sometimes 
says . . . "You're a charming woman." 

And a woman's eyes may answer . . . 
"You're a likeable person." 

And then she smiles. Lucky for both 
of them if it's a lovely, quick flash of 
white teeth, in healthy gums. 

For a glimpse of dingy teeth and ten- 
der gums can blast a budding romance in 
a split second! 

WHY IS "PINK TOOTH BRUSH" 
SO COMMON? 

It's very simple. The soft foods that we 
all eat nowadays — almost exclusively — 



OTH BRUSH" makes her avoid a 
teeth and tender gums destroy her 

cannot possibly give teeth and gums 
enough work to do to keep them healthy. 
They grow lazy. Deprived of the natural 
stimulation of hard, coarse foods, they 
become sensitive, tender. And then, pres- 
ently, "pink tooth brush" warns you 
that your gums are unhealthy — suscep- 
tible to infection. 

Modern dental practice suggests Ipana 
plus massage for several good reasons. If 
you will put a little extra Ipana on 
brush or fingertip and massage your 
gums every time you brush your teeth, 
you will understand. Rub it in thor- 




II close-ups — 

charm oughly. Massage it vig- 

orously . Do it regularly. 
And your mouth will feel cleaner. There 
will be a new and livelier tingle in your 
gums — new circulation, new firmness, 
new health. 

Make Ipana plus massage a regular 
part of your routine. It is the dentist's 
ablest assistant in the home care of the 
teeth and gums. For with healthy gums, 
you've ceased to invite "pink tooth 
brush." You are not likely to get gingi- 
vitis, pyorrhea and Vincent's disease. 
And you'll bring the clear and brilliant 
beauty of a lovely smile into any and 
every close-up. 



0 f your te ein 



ETHEL M. POMEROY, Associate Editor LESTER C. GRADY, Editor ABRIL LAMARQUE. Art Editor 

IHTE5T STORIES OF RADIO PERSOHnUTIES 



IT'S A DIZZY WORLD Dizzy Dean comes to the air 


Tom Meany 


14 


THEY ALSO SERVE Little known partners of well known stars 


Dorothy Brooks 


16 


WHY HELEN HAYES QUIT HOLLYWOOD And turned down ses.ooo.oo. . 


Mildred Mastin 


24 


MY LIFE IS AT STAKE The search for truth is dangerous, believe it or not.' . 


Robert L. Ripley 


26 


WHY HAS GRACE MOORE TRIUMPHED? A new tight on a br.ght star 


Katherine Albert 


28 


AFRAID OF LOVE! A searching analysis of glamorous Nino Martini. 


Elizabeth Benneche Petersen 


30 


FRIDAY— AT QUARTER TO FOUR A crisis in Helen OelheimS career 


Ethel M. Pomeroy 


32 


RADIO ALWAYS GETS ITS MAN! Celebrities versus contracts 


George Kent 


34 


WHEN SHALL THEY MEET AGAIN? Romeo and Juliet of the air 


Ruth Geri 


40 


SECRETS OF THE LUX RADIO THEATRE Intriguing revelations 


Dora Albert 


42 


IF 1 WERE RADIO'S MIGHTY MOGUL a few apt br.ckbats 


Fred Allen 


47 


THE PARADOXICAL MR. HIMBER Who loves practical jokes 


Helen Hover 


48 



SPECIAL FEATURES and DEPHRTmEllTS 

The Up and Up on the Lowdown 6 News Pictures 44 

Keep Young and Beautiful 10 Gossip at a Glance 49 

Board of Review 12 Radio Stars' Cooking School 50 

For Distinguished Service to Radio 19 Frank Parker 52 

In the Radio Spotlight 20 Programs Day by Day 54 

Portrait Gallery 36 Radio Stars Junior 56 

Radiolaughs 100. 



Cover by EARL CHRISTY 



Radio Stars published monthly anil copyrighted, 1985, by Dell Publishing Co.. Inr. Office of 
publication at Washington anil South Avenues. Dunellen. N". J. Executive and editorial offices, 
119 Madison Avenue. New York. X. V. Chicago advertising oltlee. 3fin North Michigan Ave. George 
Delacorte. Jr.. Pres.: II. Meyer, Vice- Pres. ; J. Fred Henry. V tee- Pres. ; M. Delacorte. Sec'y. 
Vol 7, No. 8, December, IMo, printed In 1'. 8. A. Single copy price 10 cents. Subscription price 
in the 1'nlted States, $1.(I""TT year Entered as second -class matter August 5, 1M2.- at the Post 
Oltlee ai Dunellen, N. .!.. under the act of March 3. 1S79. The publisher accepts nu responsibility 
for the return of unsolicited material. 



RADIO STARS 



SIXTEEN MEN 



From the blood-drenched decks of a man o' war 
to the ecstasy of a sun-baked paradise isle . . . from 
the tyrannical grasp of a brutal captain to the 
arms of native beauties who brought them love 
and forgetfulness . . . came sixteen men from the 
"Bounty". Now their romantic story lives on the 
screens of the world ... in one of the greatest 
entertainments since the birth of motion pictures! 



^TtIng f a ct , s } 

cess of f° 10 . lBoUO w"»nf. 

s-^^sss scen 




CHARLES CLARK 

LAUGHTON GABLE 

In Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer' s greatest production 

MUTINYontue BOUNTY 



with 



paries n ^ a UUs 



FRANCHOT TONE 

Herbert Mundin • Eddie Quillan • Dudley Digges . Donald Crisp 



A FRANK LLOYD Production 



Albert Lewin, Associate Producer 

5 



RADIO STARS 



THE UP MID UP 

OH THE LOUJDOUJn 




Picked up and set down by our inquiring reporter 



ROUTINE 

For two reasons, attending Lennie Hayton's "Hit 
Parade" is like seeing" the same movie over and over. 
The first reason, of course, is that Lennie repeats so 
many songs from week to week; the second is his 
routine with his hat. It never varies. 

You know about Hayton's hat — a bedraggled felt 
he cherishes for the luck it brings — but do you know 
what he does with it? Watch. 

We're sitting in the balcony of the world's largest 
studio. On the stage the orchestra has assembled and 
Kay Thompson's chorus, gaw-jus gals all, is filing out 
from behind the wings. On Lennie's stand is a tall 
stool — the kind bookkeepers use. To the right of 
it is a halltree. No less. 

Len comes in. He is faultlessly groomed for the 
evening — below the ears. Above them, he isn't. His 
hair is tousled and on the back of his head sits that 
hat. 

As the orchestra makes its last discordant flourish 
before the opening Hayton takes the stool from the 
stand and sets it carefully to the left. Then he 
takes his hat off and sets it on the stool. A mo- 
ment later, he fakes the hat up, puts it on, and 
walks to his piano ; there, he takes his hat off and 
hangs it on the halltree while he arranges his music 
on the rack. When he is finished, he takes his — 



but — but why repeat? — it goes on and on and on. 

And speaking of going on and on, Hayton is 
afraid some of the songs he is playing will never 
stop being favorites. He had a lot of trouble with 
"Gypsy Tea Room." Had to make it sound a little 
different every time he played it and he played it 
darn near twenty times. It now appears that "Ac- 
cent on Youth" and "Page Miss Glory" are going 
to be as bad. If you'll figure it out, it means the 
^aine song on every broadcast for more than four 
months. 

BEHIND THE VOICE 

Curtis Aniall. "Buck Rogers" looks the part. He 
is husky and looks like the broad-shouldered full- 
back who used to crash the line for your Alma 
Mammy. In addition to that, his face is perpetually 
tanned and he has a determined glint in his eyes — 
as though he meant to rip the dickens out of Mars. 
Perhaps he will do that very thing — when he gets 
into the 26th Century ! 

BE-YOOTIFUL LADY 

You and I have dropped in to watch Irene Rich 
rehearse. The sound man says, as we sit down : 
"Have you heard the 'Caspar .1/ dquct oast' rehearsal? 
Nczv eomie strip of the air, (Continued on page 8) 



Below, proud papa Walter O'Keefe 
introduces his baby to Deane Janis, 
singer on his Camel Caravan program. 



And here is Town Hall's Fred Allen, 
in a scene from his movie, "Thanks 
a Million," starring Dick Powell. 



Kadi 



LO 



HELEN HAYES, now starred in "The 
New Penny," is known as a great 
emotional actress, but she began her 
career as a mimic and a comedienne. Her 
first performance on any stage was a 
comic impersonation of Annabelle Whit- 
ford, a famous beauty of the 1900's . . . 

Jack Benny, who resumed his NBC 
laughcasts on September 29th, has decided 
to give up trying to be the best dressed 
man in Hollywood. He had bought him- 
self a new "wash rag" scarf and con- 
sidered himself pretty fancy. He couldn't 
find it one day and discovered that Mary 
Livingstone had given it to the cook to 
dry the dishes . . . 

Vivian delta Cliiesa's favorite recreation 
is painting, mainly landscapes . . . Sum- 
moned home by wire to take a role in 
"Myrt and Marge," ten-year-old Lucy Gil- 
man flew to Chicago from New York so 
she'd have an extra day in the east with 
her tivclvc-year-old actress sister, Tony 
. . . lid McConncll has moved to Chicago, 
and docs liis Sunday broadcasts from the 
WBBM studios there . . . Ken Griffin, 
"Darrcll Moore" in "Myrt and Marge," 
was admitted to Harvard at the age of 
fifteen . . . Jack Major made his profes- 
sional debut in his college town as "The 
Singing Owl" — symbol of his alma mater 
. . . Patricia Dunlap's first job, at the age 
of nine, was as sales-and-crrand girl in her 
granddad's grocery store . . .Art Thorsen, 
bass player and singer zvith Horace 
Hcidt's Brigadiers, who spends liis spare 
time building ship models, has finally set 
knife to wood for a model of the "Bounty," 
after spending nearly a year's time and 
$150 in research on the historic ship . . . 

Benay Venuta, star of radio, was thrilled 
the other night when Walter Winchell 
took J. Edgar Hoover, head "G" man, 
backstage to commend her on her per- 
formance . . . Hal Kemp uses the name 
James H. Kemp to sign business contracts 
. . . Lucy Monroe, lyric soprano star of 
"Lavender and Old Lace," is set to do 
"Marguerite" in Max Reiner's "Faust." 
She has played thirty "Marguerites" in 
grand opera . . . Mark Warnow hums as 
he directs his band but his voice has never 
been picked up by the mike . . . "The Three 
Little Words" have just returned from 
personal appearances in Detroit and Bos- 
ton . . . Grade Allen is looking forward 
to her "Mother Juice Rhymes" she intends 
putting on the air . . . Larry Harding is 
at work on another song he hopes to be 
able to announce on the air soon . . . 

Jack Johnstone, who authors and directs 
the "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century" 
scripts, recently decided to fine each mem- 
ber of his cast twenty-five cents for ap- 
pearing late for rehearsal. Result? It 
worked quite well and in six months he 
had collected only seventy-five cents. But 
the rub came when one day Jack was late. 
He had to pay each member twenty-five 
cents and there were seven in the cast! . . . 

Singin Sam has found an ideal way to 
indulge in his yen for fishing. The stream 
tliat runs past his Indiana farm is follozvcd 
through much of its course by a road. 
Sam simply drives to a likely spot, tries 
his luck, and if it is bad he keeps driving 
down stream until he finds an angler's 
paradise. If this fails, the road finally 
runs into a Hoosicr village where fresh 
fish are always on sale . . . So Sam alwavs 
returns home with a full creel. 



RADIO STARS 

Frederics 



COOLER PERMANENT WAVE 




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Patronize an Authorized Frederics shop! Look for the Frederics 
Franchise Certificate which guarantees the use of a Frederics ma 
chinel Examine all the wrappers used on your hair — make sure no 
harmful imitations are used. 




E. FREDERICS, Inc., Dept. MM1, 235-247 East 45th St., New York, N. Y. 

Kindly send me free booklet showing latest Hollywood Hair Styles and list of 
Authorized Frederics Franchise Salons in my vicinity. 

Name Address .' 

City State 



7 



RADIO STARS 



and it's a wow." Then he goes over to his turntables and 
starts an airplane motor to roaring by putting on a 
record. 

After a moment, the rehearsal gets under way. First, 
the players are to ad lib a crowd sound 
for the airport scene. You and I ad lib, 
too. We do it by saying, behind our 
hand: "Oh, 1 had' a lovely time and I'll 
have some coffee," and laughing 
brightly. 

The players run through their script 
quickly. Irene leans against a grand 
piano, puts on horn-rimmed specs, and 
starts to correct her lines. And we notice 
something. We had always known that 
Irene is the personality girl. Her eyes 
sparkle when she talks and her voice is 
vibrant and alive. But we had never 
noticed that she even smiles while 
frowning over her work. And she does. 



THE IIP MID 

up on THE 

LOUIDOUin 

{Continued from page 6) 



STRANGEST STORIES 

How odd the stories that get into circulation ! Some are 
funny, some sad, and none can be logically explained. 
The uncommonly malicious tales told about Phil Lord 
were classics in the field, of course. They painted him a 
drunkard and a fraud. It was funny the way the scan- 



dal mongers hopped back on his band wagon as soon as 
he had been exonerated. . . There are others whispered 
(and shouted) that are just as unfounded and can hurt 
just as much. One, for instance, is that Dick Powell 
engineered the removal of Ted Fiorito 
from his "Hollywood Hotel." Even 
Ted will tell you they are the best of 
pals. Another is that Paul Whiteman 
started his scholarships as a gag and 
actually doesn't contribute a cent toward 
the musical education of the winners. 
He pays plenty and the kids are plenty 
grateful. The stories that knocked Val- 
lee made his success that much sweeter ; 
and was there any purpose to the tale 
that Victor Young had married Lee 
Wiley? He hadn't, of course. . . While 
I'm on the subject, I had better spike 
another rumor that is devastating in its 
lurid implications. It's whispered that 
Jack Benny can really play "Love in 
Bloom." Well, it's an out-and-out lie, 
and Tack wants vou to know it. 



THESE GRAY WALLS 

You and I have dropped in to watch Warden Lawes 
rehearse his "20,000 Years in Sing Sing." The Warden! 




Above, radio's Warren Hull, now in the 
films, with Margaret Lindsay. Below, Lily 
Pons, with Jerry, trained seal in her nlm. 



Sandra Jean Burns (above) with Daddy 
George and Mama Gracie. Below, Jack 
Benny and "Broadway Melody of 1 936" girls. 



Wide World 






is standing at the microphone, read- 
ing from his script, which has him in 
his office at Sing Sing talking to a 
new prisoner, played by Jack Arthur. 

"Your actions will govern your 
treatment here," the Warden says. 

"I know, sir," Jack answers. 

At that point, the production-man, 
who is in the control-room, interrupts 
by means of a loudspeaker that brings 
his voice to the studio. 

"Don't he so damn cheerful, Jack," 
he booms. "You sound as though 
you've just had a promotion." 

"Or, the Warden had asked him 
in for a drink," another actor adds. 

So, when Jack says his lines over, 
his voice is a dull monotone, which 
is as it should be. 

A moment later. Warden Lawes 
turns and nods gravely to us. And 
we notice he is wearing a striped 
suit, a striped shirt, and a striped tie 
— the only person in Sing Sing who 
dresses in stripes ! 

NEW VOICES 

If you buy perfume, you know 
V amour means "love" in French. 
Maybe you know it without buying 
perfume. Anyway, with Dorothy 
L' Amour, song specialist, whose voice 
you're hearing over NBC, that's the 
whole idea, because when she sings 
her songs, she feels the presence of 
an ideal lover. No special one. Just 
an ideal. 

In case you've wondered what a 
gal has to do to feel an ideal presence 
three times a week, here's her daily 
program. She gets up at 10:30 in 
the morning and breakfasts on 
orange juice, bacon and black tea. 
Then she rehearses for three hours, 
without any fooling. After that, 
she goes to the Paramount studios, 
where she rehearses for another hour 
and a half with a dramatic coach who 
is teaching her, for the movies, to say 
things as though she means them. 
She has no lunch because she has to 
run right over to still another studio 
and rehearse for a theater presenta- 
tion act. After that she goes home 
to dress for work, which is singing 
in one of the smart late spots. 

This program is spiced, inciden- 
tally, by the fact that she is very 
temperamental. If something goes 
wrong, or even when something 
doesn't, she'll stamp her feet and 
pout and grow very angry. She cools 
off quickly, though, when allowed to 
go to a movie. 

Patti Chapin, CBS star, is another 
of the new voices. And she's so darn 
sweet everybody calls her "Patti- 
cake." Not so long ago she was a 
dentist's receptionist in Atlantic City, 
and it's probably for those two rea- 
sons that she doesn't like crowds of 
noisy people. 

For a (Continued on page 91) 



ONCE this lady fairly loathed the 
idea of taking a laxative. Post- 
poned it as long as she could. Hated 
the taste; hated the effect; hated the 
aftermath. Then she found out about 
Ex-Lax. 

It tastes just like smooth, velvety, 
delicious chocolate. Mild and gentle in 
action . . . approximating Nature. She 
found it thorough, too, without over- 
action. 

There was no need for her to keep 
on increasing the dose to get results. 
On every count she found Ex-Lax the 
ideal laxative. It is the best in America 
. . . according to America's opinion of 
it. Because more people take Ex-Lax 
than any other laxative. 46 million 



boxes were bought last year alone. 10c 

and 25c boxes; at every drug store. 

GUARD AGAINST COLDS! . . . Remember 
these common-sense rules for fighting colds 
— get enough sleep, eat sensibly, dress 
warmly, keep out of drafts, keep your feet 
dry, and keep regular— with Ex-Lax, the 
delicious chocolated laxative. 



MAIL THIS COUPON — TODAY! 
EX-LAX, Inc., P. O. Box 170 
Times-Plaza Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MM125 Please send free sample of Ex. Lax. 

Name__ 

Address _ 



(// ynu live- in Canada, write Ex-Lax, Ltd., 
736 Xotrc Dame St. W., Montreal) 

When Nature forgets — 
remember 

EX- LAX 

THE ORIGINAL CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 



Tune i n on Strange as it Seems" , new Ex-Lax Radio Program • See local news paper for station and timet 



9 



RADIO STARS 





Vivienne Segal sings Sundays on 
"The American Album of Familiar 
Music" program with Frank Munn. 



This papular star 
is a model far 
fashiaa, figure 
aoid friendliness. 





ELECTED the best-dressed woman 
in radio by the May fair Mannequin 
Academy, Vivienne Segal is our 
choice for a holiday fashion and 
charm expert. It happens that the 
Mayfair Mannequin Academy is the 
smartest in New York City. Gilded 
debutantes and professional artists' 
models mingle there to get their 
training for a "model" career. It 
was by this selective group that 
Vivienne Segal was voted the best- 
dressed woman in radio, with Gladys 
Swarthout second. 

Vivienne is a perfect model to fol- 
low, whether it be in matters of fig- 
ure, fashion, or friendliness. She 
meets people more than half-way. 
That's why she has so many friends. 
And that is an important asset to de- 
velop from a beauty standpoint. 
Mannequins may go in for statuesque 
poses, but it's the warm personality 
that wins the radio audience — and 

10 



the attention of the beauty editor. 

When I interviewed Vivienne, she 
was dressed for her broadcast. She 
was all in white, but with sparkling 
clips at the shoulders and belt, and 
sparkling bracelets on her beautifully 
moulded arms. Someone else might 
have spoiled that straight, slim sim- 
plicity of the beautiful evening gown, 
almost tailored in its well-cut lines, 
by adding a frou-frou cape or flow- 
ers. Not Vivienne. She adores 
clothes. She would rather shop than 
do anything else in the world. But 
she would give up shopping forever 
if she had to invest in fripperies. 

Simplicity is a cardinal rule in 
dress to which Vivienne adheres. To 
quote Vivienne, "Sins of omission 
are better than sins of commission 
when it comes to dressing." Pin 
that on your mirror when it comes 
time to dress for your most impor- 
tant holiday party. It's good advice! 



Another axiom of Vivienne's is: 
"If you dress in haste, you'll repent 
at leisure." Some of us have re- 
pented in the dressing-room, where 
we have retired to save a little of our 
pride from wallflower prominence 
on the dance floor. Some of us 
have tried to sit on our hands when 
we became conscious of our mani- 
curing negligence, after it was too 
late to do anything about it. Some 
of us even have lost a job on that 
account, or the blossoming of a ro- 
mance. Haste lays waste many a 
beautiful evening for the woman 
who must be well-groomed if she is 
to be well poised. 

Most girls have spasms of doing 
things for their faces or their fig- 
ures or their hands or their coiffures, 
Maybe on a Sunday they'll go in for 
a really strenuous session with their 
mirror and their beauty aids. Mon- 
day they'll feel so festive that they 



RADIO STARS 




Warm milk, as a nightcap, is one 
of Vivienne's favorite means of 
relaxation after the stress of a 
broadcast, when she feels too 
tense to think of bed and sleep. 



won't bother with any beauty rou- 
tine. By Thursday they'll be back 
in the same old rut again. 

Vivienne believes that the only in- 
surance policy that you can take out 
in "well-groomedness" is one that 
invokes system. Sunday for the 
pedicure, Sunday and Wednesday 
for the manicure, Saturday for the 
hair, and so on. And the figure 
must be watched every day — every 
meal, every time you're slipping into 
that slinky new satin or velvet that 
reveals the hipline so conspicuously. 
Vivienne has regular massages. She 
dotes on them as a means of relaxa- 
tion as well as a means of keeping 
"mannequin's hips." Regular mas- 
sages might not be possible for all of 
us, but regular exercising, and regu- 
lar attention to diet most certainly 
are possible. 

Warm milk as a nightcap is an- 
other of Vivienne's favorite means 
of relaxation, especially right after 
the stress of a broadcast when she is 
all keyed up and feeling more like 
dancing than going to bed for her 
beauty sleep. You see her at her 
cocktail bar sipping milk, a good 
hint for all would-be beauties 
around the holidays. 

Vivienne (Continued on pcujc 77) 



. . says Ihis California bride 



Tall— with honey-colored hair, 
gray eyes and a smooth, beauti- 
ful skin — Camay never had a fairer 
or more sincere advocate. 

What she doesn't quite under- 
stand is why all women — every- 
where — aren't just as devoted to 
Camay! And there is something in 
her viewpoint. Because if you, and 
you, and you would begin today 
with Camay — note how swiftly it 
lathers and how luxuriantly — how 



CAMAY 



pleasant is its delicate fragrance — 
how soft and smooth it keeps your 
skin — what definite improvements 
follow its use— Camay would be vour 
beauty soap, solely and exclusivelv! 

Buy at least three cakes of Camay 
today. You'll find that its price is 
surprisingly low. 

Let Camay bring your loveliness to light. 




T <F0 



' tor 



C 7%e Sytzfi of Sccuctcfti£ fc/emten. 



n 



RADIO STARS 



BORRD OF REVIEW 



Lester C. Grady 

Radio Stars Magnz ne. Chairman 

Alton Cook 
N. Y. World-Telegram. N. Y. C. 
S. A. Coleman 
Wichita Beacon. Wichita. Kan. 

Norman Siegel 
Cleveland Press. Cleveland, 0. 
Andrew W. Smith 
News &. Age-Herald, Birmingham, 
Ala. 



Lecta Rider 

Houston Chronicle, Houston, Texas 
Si Steinhauser 
Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Leo Miller 
Bridgeport Herald. Bridgeport, Conn 

Charlotte Greer 
Newark Evening News, Newark, N. J. 
Richard G. Moffett 
Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, 
Fla. 



James Sullivan 

Louisville Times, Louisville, Ky. 
R. B. Westergaard 
Register & Tribune. Des Moines, la. 

C. L. Kern 
Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Larry Wolters 
Chicago Tribune, Chicago, III. 
James E. Chinn 
Evening and Sunday Star, Washing- 
ton. D. C. 



H. Dean Fitzer 

Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. 
Vivian M. Gardner 
Wisconsin News, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Joe Haeffner 
Buffalo Evening News. Buffalo, N. Y. 

Andrew W. Foppe 
Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, 0. 
Oscar H. Fernbach 
San Francisco Examiner, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



**** 



LUCKY STRIKE HIT PARADE WITH 
FRED ASTAIRE, LENNIE HAYTON, KAY 
THOMPSON AND CHARLES CARLILE 
(NBC). 

Current winner of Radio Stars Dis- 
tinguished Service Award. 

HOLLYWOOD HOTEL WITH DICK 
POWELL, GUEST SCREEN STARS AND 
RAY PAIGE'S ORCHESTRA (CBS). 

Recent winner of Radio Stars Dis- 
tinguished Service Award. 

EDDIE CANTOR WITH PARKYAKAR- 
KAS, JIMMY WALLINGTON AND GUEST 
ORCHESTRAS (CBS). 

Laughs and tunes galore. 

COLUMBIA SYMPHONIC HOUR — VIC- 
TOR BAY, CONDUCTOR (CBS). 

Glorifying the classics. 

AMERICAN ALBUM OF FAMILIAR MU- 
SIC WITH FRANK MUNN, VIVIENNE 
SEGAL AND GUS HAENSCHEN'S OR- 
CHESTRA (NBC). 

A favorite of long standing. 

FLEISCHMANN VARIETY HOUR WITH 
RUDY VALLEE AND GUESTS (NBC). 

Consistently above the average. 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY (NBC). 

Life as you know it. 

CITIES SERVICE CONCERT WITH JES- 
SICA DRAGONETTE (NBC). 

Would that there were more like Jessica.' 

MAJOR BOWES' AMATEUR HOUR 
(NBC). 

everybody's listening! 

VOICE OF FIRESTONE WITH WILLIAM 
DALY'S ORCHESTRA, MARGARET 
SPEAKS AND MIXED CHORUS (NBC). 

One of the finest on the air. 

JELLO PROGRAM STARRING JACK 
BENNY, MICHAEL BARTLETT AND 
JOHNNY GREEN'S ORCHESTRA (NBC). 

Making the world a merrier place to live 



WALTZ TIME — FRANK MUNN, TENOR; 
VIVIENNE SEGAL, SOPRANO; AND ABE 
LYMAN'S ORCHESTRA (NBC). 

Better than ever. 

FORD SUNDAY EVENING SYMPHONY — 
VICTOR KOLAR, CONDUCTOR (CBS). 

Class with a capital C. 



RATINGS 

At present, there are so many 
excellent programs on the air 
the judges found it quite impos- 
sible to single out the best five. 
Practically every important pro- 
gram has been considered, but, 
unfortunately, space does not per- 
mit a complete listing. The 
ratings are as follows : 

**** Excellent 
*** Good 
** Foir 

The ratings of the Board of 
Review are a consensus of opinion 
of radio editors throughout the 
country and do not necessarily 
agree with the editorial opinion of 
Radio Stars Magazine. 

There has been an amazing 
general improvement in radio pro- 
grams. Today there is scarcely a 
program on the air which is 
without merit. 



LESLIE HOWARD DRAMATIC SKETCHES 
(CBS). 

Of course, you haven't missed one 

GRACE MOORE (NBC). 

Beautiful to hear, beautiful to see. 

WALLACE BEERY AND THE SHELL 
PROGRAM (NBC). 

Just as entertaining as he is on the screen. 

GENERAL MOTORS CONCERTS (NBC). 

Transforming us all into confirmed music 
lovers. 

RCA MAGIC KEY (NBC). 

Always an all-star cast of guests. 

WORLD PEACEWAYS (CBS). 

War on wart 

HELEN HAYES (NBC). 

Superb artistry, as you like it. 



CHESTERFIELD PROGRAM (CBS). 

Lily Pons and Xino Martini on alternate 

nights. 

TOWN HALL TONIGHT (NBC). 

Fred Allen in person. 

FORD PROGRAM WITH FRED WARING'S 
PENNSYLVANIANS AND STOOPNAGLE 
& BUDD (CBS). 

Extraordinary melody and humor. 

LAWRENCE TIBBETT, BARITONE, WITH 
DON VOORHEES AND HIS ORCHESTRA 
(CBS). 

Powerfully good. 

CAMEL CARAVAN WITH WALTER 
O'KEEFE, DEANE JANIS AND GLEN 
GRAY AND THE CASA LOMA ORCHES- 
TRA (CBS). 

You'd walk a mile for this program. 

PHIL BAKER WITH BEETLE, BOTTLE 
AND HAL KEMP'S ORCHESTRA (CBS). 

A grand job. 

LUX RADIO THEATRE (CBS). 

Seldom less than superior. 

KATE SMITH'S COFFEE TIME WITH 
JACK MILLER'S ORCHESTRA (CBS). 

Don't miss it. 

MAXWELL HOUSE SHOW BOAT (NBC). 

It's been changed for the better. 

PALMOLIVE BEAUTY BOX THEATRE 
(NBCl. 

Dynamic John Barclay and guests. 



*** 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA (NBC). 

limphasis on the classics. 

BOND BREAD WITH FRANK CRUMIT 
AND JULIA SANDERSON (CBS). 

Favorites from away back. 

MAJOR BOWES' CAPITOL FAMILY 
(NBC). 

Almost as good as his amateurs. 

NATIONAL AMATEUR NIGHT WITH 
RAY PERKINS (CBS). 

Not quite as amusing as the Major's. 

PENTHOUSE SERENADE— DON MARIO 
(NBC). 

Don is always enjoyable. 

LADY ESTHER PROGRAM WITH 
WAYNE KING AND ORCHESTRA (CBS) 
(NBC). 

Distinctive. 




RADIO STARS 



FREDDIE RICH'S PENTHOUSE PARTY 
(CBS). 

Well worth the dialing. 

MANHATTAN MERRY-CO-ROUND WITH 
RACHEL CARLAY AND AND «■ SANNELLA'S 
ORCHESTRA (NBC). 

Lively. 

BOAKE CARTER (CBS). 

Whatever he says sounds important. 

ONE NIGHT STANDS WITH PICK AND 
PAT (CBS). 

All for fun and fun for all. 

JERRY COOPER, BARITONE (CBS). 

One of the better voices. 

SILKEN STRINGS WITH CHARLES PRE- 
VIN'3 ORCHESTRA (NBC). 

Lovely. 

THE BAKERS BROADCAST WITH ROBERT 
L. RIPLEY; OZZIE NELSON AND HIS OR- 
CHESTRA WITH HARRIET HILLIARD 
(NBC). 

Has everything it takes. 

NEILA GOODELLE (NBC). 

Originality. 

TASTYYEAST OPPORTUNITY MATINEE 
(NBC). 

The amateurs again. 

ROSES AND DRUMS (NBC). 

Long a leader. 

SALT LAKE CITY TABERNACLE CHOIR 
AND ORGAN (CBS). 

When you're in the mood. 

SISTERS OF THE SKILLET (CBS). 

Otherwise known as Ld East and Ralph 
Dumke. 

MELODIAN A (CBS). 

Abe Lyman, Bcrnice Claire and Oliver Smith. 

JERGENS PROGRAM WITH WALTER 
WINCHELL (NBC,. 

Gossip galore! 

LOG CABIN (NBC). 

Yes, indeed. 

LIFE SAVERS' RENDEZVOUS (NBC). 

The night club idea. 

KALTENBORN EDITS THE NEWS (CBS). 

Never dull. 

RICHARD HIMBER'S STUDEBAKER CHAM- 
PIONS (CBS). 

Style aplenty. 

TOM POWERS (NBC). 

True characterizations. 

WARDEN LAWES (NBC). 

Drama behind the bars. 

THORNTON FISHER SPORTS REVUE 
(NBC). 

Whether you're a sports fan or not, you'll like 
it. 

ATLANTIC FAMILY (CBS). 

Frank Parker is starred. 

BROADWAY VARIETIES (CBS). 

Vaudeville. 

LAZY DAN (CBS). 

Easy on the disposition. 

GEORGE BURNS AND GRACIE ALLEN 
(CBS). 

Grade's still a card. 

SOCONY SKETCHBOOK (CBS). 

Smart entertainment. 

A AND P GYPSIES (NBC). 

Harry Horlick and his orchestra. 

SINCLAIR GREATER MINSTRELS (NBC). 

With all the old time zest. 

PHILIP MORRIS PROGRAM (NBC). 

Leo Rcisman's music never disappoints. 

VIC AND SADE (NBC). 

Well established. 

CAMPANA'S FIRST NIGHTER WITH JUNE 
MEREDITH AND DON AMECHE (NBC). 

Try it tonight, if you haven't already. 

GABRIEL HEATTER (NBC). 

A first-rate news interpreter. 

HAMMERSTEIN'S MUSIC HALL (NBC). 

A new idea, 

EVENING IN PARIS (NBC). 

The Pickens Sisters for one thing! 

ALEXANDER WOOLLCOTT (CBS). 

Words and how to use them. 

(Continued on page 80) 





NEMO 



***** 



"Your corsets — since you wear 
them next to your skin — need fre- 
quent washings," declares Nemo. 
"Not only to preserve their looks 
and fit, but because perspiration 
when allowed to remain in fine 
corsets actually rots away the 
strength of the fabric!" 

A DANGER. Your corsets are 
made of "live" fabric — need gen- 
tle treatment. Don't make the 
mistake of washing them with hot 
water or a strong soap! Any soap 
less pure than Ivory is apt to 
make the elastic flabby. Use chif- 
fon-thin Ivory Flakes, made of 
pure Ivory Soap — "safe even for 
a baby's skin." 

A PRECAUTION. "If you give 
your corsets Ivory Flakes care you 
can keep them looking as they did 
in the fitting room," promises 
Nemo. "Ivory Flakes are an ab- 
solutely pure soap — they preserve 
the elasticity and fit, prolong the 
life of fine corsets!" 



DO's and DON'Ts in Corset-washing 

DO use lukewarm water and pure Ivory Flakes. 

DON'T use a less-pure soap — it weakens fabrics. 
DO squeeze suds through, using a soft brush on soiled 
spots — Rinse in lukewarm water. 

DON'T rub, wring or twist — it may distort the 

garment. 

DO roll in towel and knead to remove excess moisture. 

DON'T allow to remain rolled up. 
DO dry garment away from heat — Press fabric parts 
on wrong side with a moderately warm iron. 

DON'T use hot iron — Don't iron elastic. 



IVORY 

FLAKES 

for SaL 



IVORY FLAKES 



RADIO STARS 




c/ 

By Tom me any 



Below (left), Dizzy enjoys a favorite pas- 
time. And here is the entire Dean 
family (left to right), Mrs. Dizzy, Dad, 
Mrs. Paul, (standing) Dizzy, Elmer, Paul. 





WHEN you consider the tremendous amount 
df words flung over the air-waves every year 
on behalf of sporting events, it seems odd that 
sport has yet to contrihute its first radio per- 
sonality. There are sports hroadcastcrs, to 
be sure, some of them good, some of them 
bad, hut there is no one figure from sport itself who 
definitely has established himself in the field of radio. 
There's a strong possibility that Dizzy Dean, the flamboy- 
ant Cardinal pitching star, may yet be the man. 

Guest stars from baseball, football, boxing and tennis 

14 



have appeared on various commercial broadcasts, hut no 
sport celebrity ever has been able to carry his own pro- 
gram over any appreciable period. The nearest approach 
was Babe Ruth, who was on the air thrice weekly for 
thirteen weeks in the spring of 1934 for a breakfast food. 

The Babe, like practically every other notable sporting 
figure who has tried the air-waves, suffered because be 
is not a good reader. As an extemporaneous speaker, the 
Babe was line, hut he dropped into a near-drone when 
reading his lines. And his scrip! , in my opinion, was 
the best anv athlete has had to work with on the air so 



RADIO STARS 



Pitching Pride 
of the National 
League — Dizzy 
Dean himself! 




Baseball's Colorful Hero, 
Dizzy Dean, Promises to 
be as Popular on the dir. 



Below, Announcer Ford Bond rehearses the 
Dean brothers for a footlight engagement. 
(Lower right) Fans, meet Paul "Daffy" and 
Jerome "Dizzy," in the Cardinals' dugout. 




far. It was written by Bill Slocum, veteran New York 
City baseball writer and Ruth's close friend for the last 
fifteen or twenty years. 

Possibly the nearest thing to a regular sports program 
by an athlete, is the weekly feature of Dizzy Dean, who 
last year was voted, by sports editors throughout the 
country, the outstanding athlete in these United States. 
Diz goes on the air weekly for an East St. Louis, Il- 
linois, furniture dealer when the Cardinals are at home. 

It would be fitting if Dean were to be the first sports 
figure to establish a regular place in radio. Diz is a 



natural broadcaster — with or without a microphone. He 
loves to sound off, as ball players phrase it, has the nat- 
ural instincts of a showman and positive genius for saving 
something that starts people talking. His background is 
the most interesting since the late Jack Dunn lifted Babe 
Ruth from a Baltimore orphanage to become baseball's 
brightest star. 

With his brother Paul, Diz constitutes the best source 
of copy in the sports world. Diz, spokesman for the 
pair, gets headlines without benefit of performance. And, 
the beauty of it is, he has the (Continued on page 61) 



RADIO STARS 



THEV 
ALSO 
SERVE 




By Dorothy Brooks 



Three notables of the radio scene — Dixie Lee (top 
picture), who won a place of her own before she 
chose to be Mrs. Bing Crosby. (Center) Gertrude 
Berg, who reversed the process, with the help of 
her husband. And (below) lovely Annette Hanshaw, 
whose husband devotes himself to her career. 



WHEN a young woman sacrifices a promising 
and profitable career, as a lawyer, an actress, 
or proprietress of a tea shoppe, and trades the 
ups and downs of making her own way in the 
world for the security of a home, a husband, 
and all that goes with them, her sisters beam 
approval. She is, of course, fulfilling a woman's natural 
destiny. But let a husband abandon his career to work, 
no matter how unselfishly, to further the career of his 
wife, and society is apt to view the self-sacrificing man 
through prejudiced eyes. 

Nowhere is that viewpoint more evident than in the 
field of radio. Dixie Lee was applauded when she left 
a promising screen career to mother three babies for 
Bing Crosby, and incidentally to mother Bing himself, 
while he rose to fame he had only dreamed of before he 
met her. The two Bennett sisters, acclaimed as screen 
stars of the first magnitude, secretly envy their lesser pub- 
licized sister, Barbara, because of her happy marriage to 
Morton Downey, even though she abandoned a place she 
already had won on Page One for romance and domes- 
ticity. Margaret Livingstone bade fair to become the 
screen's Number One home wrecker when she resigned to 
become the Number One heart interest in the life of Paul 
White-man. 

Those women, and the others who have done likewise, 
bask contentedly in their husbands' reflected glory. The 
world drapes figurative laurel wreaths over their brows 
for the "sacrifice" they have made of their own careers. 

But what of the husbands who are content to remain 
unsung in the background, shadowed by the glamour of 
famous radio wives? Husbands who actually work harder 
to further their wives' careers than the most slave-driven 
8.30-to-5.30 commuter — what is their reward? Certainly 
16 





RADIO STARS 

Hn appreciation of the silent partners ta the shining 
success of many of radio's most popular fauorites. 



not the acclaim given to wives when the position is re- 
versed. Indeed, they often are referred to sneeringly hy 
men who work only half as hard, and achieve far less than 
half as much. 

Countless radio fans could tell you what Annette Han- 
shaw eats for breakfast, but they never heard of " Wally" 
Rose. Even a casual tuner-inner may have heard that 
Ruth Etting makes her own clothes, but will look blank if 
you mention Colonel Snyder. Who does not know every 
little detail in the rise to fame of Grace Moore? Yet 
how many could tell you who is Valentin Parera's favorite 
singer? These radio husbands, and others similiarly sit- 
uated form a silent legion of unselfish men who, giving all, 
ask nothing. 

During the war, mothers who sat behind the lines at 
home were given a star in recognition of, their sacrifice, 
devotion, and silent courage. Pin a star, then, on the 
lapel of Herman "Wally" Rose, self-effacing and highly 
efficient husband of Annette Hanshaw. You might nomi- 
nate Wally Hero Husband Number One. He was a highly- 
paid and unusually successful executive of the Columbia 
Recording Studios until the fateful summer day when the 
motor of his automobile went dead near Mt. Kisco, New- 
York. Wally hied himself to a nearby hotel for a bite of 
lunch while repairs were being made. There he overheard 
the proprietor's daughter singing a haunting melody, and 
from that day to this, Wally Rose never has had another 
thought for his own personal success. The hotel pro- 
prietor's daughter, whose voice captivated the recording 
executive, was Annette Hanshaw, eighteen, then, with 
flaxen hair curling about her doll-like face. 

Rose's mission in life then and there became the ad- 
vancement of Annette Hanshaw to the place in the sun 
which he felt she deserved. His fulfillment of that mis- 
sion is attested by the success Annette subsequently en- 



joyed, first as a recording artist and later as a radio 
chanteuse. Rose gave up his job and devoted every mo- 
ment of his time to the girl twenty years his junior. 
Shrewdly he managed her affairs ; painstakingly he taught 
her the art of "putting over" a song. His devotion to his 
girl-wife has been an epic of unselfishness and consider- 
ation. Any married woman will appreciate his courage 
as exemplified in his deliberate encouragement of the illu- 
sion fostered among Annette's public that she is unmar- 
ried. Because Annette's popularity has been built largely 
upon her appeal to the young, Rose has bent every effort 
to suppress all reference to the fact that she is married. 

Annette is fragile and easily upset temperamentally. So, 
while she lies abed until afternoon, Rose is up early 
bustling about the city selecting her songs, doing the thou- 
sand and one chores attendant upon radio success. One 
incident will illustrate his considerate care for his talented 
young wife. I was present one day when he painstakingly 
took apart a radio publication which contained a photo- 
graph Annette did not like, a picture of herself which had 
been released for publication by mistake and without her 
approval or that of Rose. With infinite patience he un- 
bound the magazine, removed the offending page, and 
then put the paper back together again so that Annette, 
perusing it. would not be upset by the picture. During 
the entire month the magazine was on sale, he was un- 
remitting in his successful efforts to prevent her from 
seeing the photograph. 

Few romances of the entertainment world are so suc- 
cessful as the Abie's Irish Rose marriage of Ruth Etting 
and her husband-manager Colonel Snyder. The envious 
point to the Colonel's luck is being married to one of the 
richest of radio stars. They overlook the fact that when 
he married Ruth, she was singing in an obscure Chicago 
cafe. Sacrificing a promising {Continued on page 85) 




RADIO STARS 





The introduction — he 
gives you the once 
over — do your eyes 
invite friendship? 



The first date- 
he follows your 
eyes, searching 
for understand- 
in g, for more 
than friendship. 



SIX STAGES 
I OF LOVE 



j 



Then the fateful 
moment, when 
gazing into each 
others eyes, the 
realization of love 
comes. 



EYES 
INVITE 
ROMANCE 




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The proposal — the 
"yes" in your eyes says 
more than lips ever can. 



At the altar — eyes meet 
in sacred understanding. 



On the honeymoon and 
ever after he adores your 
eyes — from the very 
introduction you've kept 
your lashes long and 
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Mascara. 



WINX 



18 



RADIO STARS 



FOR DISTMGUISHED 
SERUICE TO RRDIO 





The nimble-footed Fred Astaire, 
equally entertaining with his voice, 
has become one of radio's favor- 
ite personalities since appearing 
on the program. 



TO the persistently popu- 
lar "Lucky Strike Hit Pa- 
. rade," starring Fred As- 
taire with Lennie Hayton's 
orchestra, RADIO STARS 
MAGAZINE presents its 
monthly award for Distin- 
guished Service to Radio. 
Never has a livelier, more 
tuneful, more invigorating 
program brightened the airwaves. The "Lucky 
Strike Hit Parade" has the nation tapping its feet 
and humming away the blues! 

Selecting the week's fifteen most popular tunes 
Has given the program an envied individuality and 
established it as something decidedly more enter- 
taining and interesting than simply an hour of 
dance music. Although many of the songs con- 




The youthful Lennie Hayton, whose 
rhythmic orchestra you hear on 
the "Lucky Strike Hit Parade," 
started his mastery of the piano 
at the age of six. 



tinue as hits week after week, 
Lennie Hayton's masterful 
and varied arrangements 
keep the numbers sparklingly 
new. Lennie's arrangements 
don't confuse and befuddle, 
but bring out and enrich the 
melody of the song. 

The addition of Fred As- 
taire, whose charming sophis- 
tication is not lost on the air; the remarkably fine 
voices of Kay Thompson, Charles Carlile and the 
Rhythm Boys; the program's flawless presentation 
and timeliness and the music of Lennie Hayton and 
his orchestra make the- "Lucky Strike Hit Parade" 
outstanding entertainment. RADIO STARS MAG- 
AZINE is delighted to honor it with its Distin- 
guished Service to Radio Award! 



RADIO 




Wide World 



Above areAke Boswell sisters — it loob like five, 
but it's only Constance, Martha and Vet. The 
other two are what is called "atmosphere". 
And below are two who are heard in the "Club 
Continental" — Gertrude Niesen and Phil Regan. 



Johnny Green (above), the youthful conductor 
of "In the Modem Manner", is pictured here 
at home in the modern manner with Mrs. Green. 
Radio songsters James Melton and Jane froman 
(below) now are featured in a motion picture. 



People Vou Know and Loue 
Hew Photographs of Voor 
Fauorites of the Hiriuaues. 



r 




Two tainted music-makers (above!, Loit Ravel, 
contralto, and U'rth Stevens, orchestra direc- 
tor, work on a new song. Below, "Any day is 
unlucky when you meet Grade Allen, says 
Black Cat, while husband George Burns groans. 




11! Tilt 




and 




pas* 10 





Tiny Helen Hayes and her hu$b< 
Charles MacArthur, at breakf 



I 




Hay Lrc Jackson Photo 



Here Is One 



AT the height of her screer 
career, Helen Hayes ha.' 
turned her back on the golc 
and tinsel of Hollywood and 
said : "I'm through." 
There was none of the usual con 
tract trouble, no flare of temperament 
no studio quarrel. With best wishes t( 
all, she vacated her Hollywood home, dis- 
mantled her bungalow-dressing-room, am 
boarded an east-lxiund train amid choruse 
of: "Why, WHY. Whyt' 
Her answer, briefly, was: "I've signed 
radio contract for twenty-six weeks on th< 
air. W'hile it has been pointed out that 
could handle the broadcasting from th< 
coast, working in pictures simultaneously 
I don't want to do that. 1 feel that 
could not do justice to the radio progran 
if I tried to make movies at the same time. 
Hollywood gasped. The radio world cheered 
Hollywood gasped because, in making he 
choice at this time. Miss Hayes turned dowi 
one of the most flattering offers ever made t' 
a movie star: an offer of $85,000.00 to pla 
the lead in the screen version of the Pulitze 
Prize winner, "The Old Maid." 
The radio world cheered because it was the firs 
time a movie star had deserted films to turn t 
broadcasting. Always before it had l)een th 
other way around — the screen snatching 'taler 
away from the air with dazzling, extravagant offer: 



UUHV HELEH HHVES 



24 





Clark and Mrs. Gable, Helen and 
Charles MacArthur in Hollywood. 



Three friends, Dolores Del Rio, 
Helen Hayes and Virginia Bruce. 



Star Hollywood's Glittering Offers Could dot Hold 



To those who know her story, there was nothing 
strange about Helen Hayes' choice. To her friends, it 
seemed inevitable that she should retire from the screen. 

In the first place, she has always hated the idea of 
being a movie star. That career is alien to her nature. 

A person of simple tastes, she resented the fact that 
she was expected to look and act like a glamour-lady of 
the screen. In Hollywood, surrounded by glittering con- 
stellations of beautifully gowned women, she said sadly : 
"I'm certainly the worst-dressed woman in America !" 

Once she overheard a girl exclaim to 
her escort : "But it can't be Helen . 
Hayes ! No movie star would wear a b u mi 
shabby coat like that!" Helen was so 
upset she went out immediately and 111 0 5 

bought a beautiful sable wrap, comment- 
ing apologetically : "After all, a sable 
coat will do to cover up any kind of a dress, won't it?" 

But Hollywood is a city of fine feathers, where women 
recline for hours on end in perfumed beauty salons ; 
where a day is not considered wasted if it has been spent 
choosing a dress or a hat. It was a new world to Helen 
Hayes, and she never quite understood it. Her world 
since childhood had been one of serious, hard work. On 
the stage since she was nine years old, she had studied 
and slaved and fought her way up from children's roles 
to ingenue parts, and over the high hurdle to starring. 

Sleeper jumps, nightly performances, rehearsals till 
dawn, summer stock, meals on the fly, tedious costume 
fittings, and always study, study, study. If she had a 
moment's leisure, there were books she should read, plays 
to be seen, dear friends with whom she cherished an 



afternoon. Time always has been precious to her. She 
never could quite fit into the Hollywood merry-go-round, 
where it was considered smart to pour time and energy 
into the business of making a good appearance. 

Then, there is her family. She always resented the way 
the screen interfered with her home and family life. She 
went to Hollwood first, not to go into movies, but to join 
her husband, Charles MacArthur, who was there under 
contract, writing scenarios. When it was announced in 
the New York papers that Helen Hayes — one of the stage's 
great ones, who never had even sub- 
mitted to a screen test — was leaving for 
I 0 r B d Hollywood, reporters rushed to catch her 
at the station. They saw her boarding 
till C-^" the train, her baby in her arms. And to 
their question : "Why are you going to 
Hollywood?" she answered simply: "I 
want to be with Charlie." 

Once on the Coast, she was talked into playing in "The 
Sin of Madelon Claudet." Charlie had just finished 
writing the script for the film. Helen played the part 
and won the Academy Award with her performance. 
And after that the movie net tightened. Many of her 
admirers, for a long time, feared that she gradually would 
be weaned away from Broadway and "an art that was 
moi-e subtle than any she had a chance to exhibit on the 
screen. 

But there never was a time when leaving for the coa-t 
wasn't a heartbreak for her. At their home in Nyack, 
New York, with Charlie and their child, Mary, with her 
flower gardens to tend and friends close f by, she was 
happy. But she never was ( Continued on page 79) 



QUIT HOLLYWOOD 



25 




By ROBERT 
I . R I P I E V 



Did you know that sausages grew onj 
trees? Here is Robert L "Believe It 
or Not" Ripley, picking one from a 
tree near Nairobi, Kenya Colony, Central 
Africa. It is a fruit, really. Dried, 
we use them in America for sponges. 
Natives use them for food, drink and! 
clothing. In the Royal Temple Garden, 1 
Bangkok, Siam, is this fearsome statue. 



LIFE IS BT 



Belieue it or not! fleuertheless I wouldn't change 




QUEEREST thing I know is the idea you 
folks have that this job of mine is easy! 
Nothing to do, you think, but roam about the 
world, draw pictures, talk over the radio and 
make pots of money ! 
Let me tell you here and now that there are 
times when it is the toughest job in the world, times when 
my life is at stake. For example, how would you like to 
travel for days across China without a bit of food, -with 
fleas nipping you from toe to collar-bone, with mosquitoes 
chawing great chunks out of your neck and ears — and all 
the time the heat frying you, the smells of your compart- 
ment driving you berserk? Would you, once safely 
arrived in civilization, go on with the job? Maybe you 
would — and then again, you might quit right there. 

I have traveled in one hundred and eighty countries, on 
steamships, trains, planes, boats, camel-back, horse-back, 
mule-back — in rickshas, ox-carts and dog-wagons. Thrill- 
ing? Certainly it is— but only when I'm safe at home! 
It's thrilling chatting about my adventures over coffee 
taken on a clean, American porch with some friends. And 

26 



how pleasant to dream about far-off places in a snug 
studio before a crackling log fire! 

But in the jungle there is no comfort and little security. 
In the jungle there are no waiters — and the food can be 
anything from stewed grasshoppers to roasted snake. 
Sometimes, to save myself from hunger, I have eaten 
whatever strange food was set before me. To quench my 
thirst I have swallowed water from polluted streams. 
And why I have not got typhoid I do not know. Dysen- 
tery I have had several times. They call this the plague 
of the tropics, this illness which drains your energy 
Lying day after day listlessly in bed. I have felt that an) 
job, however wretched, was better than this one of min« 
with all its glamour. 

Yes, I am only a reporter and only a small percentage 
of the oddities I talk about are the result of my owr 
bright ideas. I have a staff of sixteen who plow theit' 
way through books and magazines in thirteen languages] 
medical books, old manuscripts, brittle old records. The; 
smoke out many weird facts. And when they are nol 
busy discovering the fantastic, they are checking tb* i 



In Kairovan, North Afnca, one of 
the holiest cities of the Mohamme- 
dan world, these anchors are trea- 
sured, believed to be the selfsame 
ones with which Noah fastened his 
Ark to Mt. Ararat. And in Bali, in 
the Dutch East Indies, the natives 
give more time to play than to work. 
Here are two holiday grotesques. 



STAKE! 



jabs with anybody! 




SLOW UP* 



veracity of suggestions received in the mail. 

People ask me how soon I shall come to the 
end of my oddities. The answer is — never. 
That part of my job is easy. I could lock my- 
self up for ten years, never stir, and still be 
able to make you gasp at your loud-speaker 
three hundred and sixty-five days a year. And 
longer, too. Yes, and without repeating myself 
once ! 

Back in 1918, when I drew my first Believe 
It or Not cartoon for the New York Globe, I 
almost went crazy trying to find ideas for the 
next one. But as I struggled, it grew easier. 
The second was the hardest — the twentieth was 
relatively easy. It gets easier all the time and 
I have been at it seventeen years — and I think 
I could continue for one hundred and seventeen. 

Something there is about human beings that 
drives them to doing curious things. Here, for 
example, is a fond father who wants to build a 
doll's house for his {Continued on page 64) 



Ripley finds 
other oddities 
in East Africa. 
The Royal East 
African Auto 
Association 
posts this sign, 
warning drivers 
to hoot — lest, 
rounding a turn, 
ey come upon 
sleeping lion! 



th 



a sleeping 





Olittt sbe , Above her J tbe }eg 

" e PS£rv ^ *!l and opera igfSS* 
SeWOtn 1 screen wer e h*^ 

It* Accorded tc > je > A t0 be n 

Grace > «rasn l * P vtremei> 

ner Set ^° n1 
28 stops ner 



^ *Sif». it ?^? it had o< 



her. ^ e 

aS s^ en \S eves. that 
raS g'^ en an ?v V> ^ divine*' ftoV 

0 ff oi Grace s K> it must 

U nd ' \ Grace «u 
floppy- 



v to the ^ \^ vvrth 

• 9 to hev >o ^ ^ge W*?^ ^\oore > 

oratUy^S r 0 \umhia at a se e, * hat Grace 

S^^t ff t d eve^^ gW in ^^ e 
>5e\son ^ J be \eU, e* at ty vn ot tbe 

„crY\t atter rT yveo. paU trtw w c be ^ va f r . 
to so W « ul £ e teg«^ r WtM-«e e ? one toU *° ian 



29 





NINO MARTINI has never said: "I love 
you," to any woman ! 

That is because these words have meaning for 
him, a meaning beyond the glib assurance a 
chance moon or a star-hung night can give to 
men's tongues. 
It goes deeper than that. This most romantic tenor of 
all is afraid to love. 

When a man or woman is caught up in a neurosis, 
psychologists trace back through the years to the begin- 
nings of that man or woman. Somewhere in their child- 
hood lies the thing that is the basis for their fear and 
holds them back from living completely and fully. 

Martini is a little surprised, himself, that no woman has 
ever touched him so deeply that life without her would 
be intolerable. A psychologist would probably say the 
answer is the tomb he visited as a child. 

Romeo and Juliet lie in that tomb, quiet in their sleep 
of all time. 

Nino Martini knew about love before most boys do. 
For in that city of Verona where he was born, were born, 
too, the lovers held most dearly to the world's heart. 
There where he had his being, Romeo and Juliet had their 
being, and lived their little while and died because they 
loved each other so much that neither could bear living 
without the other. 

That tomb was in his consciousness from the first time 



By Elizabeth Benneche Petersen 



impressions began to creep in upon his baby brain. For 
the land surrounding it was owned by his grandfather and 
his father was custodian of the young lovers' last resting 
place. They took that tomb casually for the most part, 
the Martinis, and Nino remembers how his mother used 
to go into it to wash and prepare vegetables for the family 
dinner, for it was cool in there and sheltered from the 
heat of an Italian summer. 

It was different with the boy. When he first began to 
sing he sought seclusion in his shyness and he had discov- 
ered, too, that the acoustics in this chamber fashioned of 
century-old stone were perfect as a practice hall. So it 
was to Romeo and Juliet that he first poured out his 
heart in song. 

It must have sunk deep in this sensitive boy's imagina- 
tion, singing of love to those young lovers dead. When 
he speaks their names it is as if he were speaking, not of 
two people who have become a legend, but of a boy and a 
girl whom he knows." A boy and a girl for whom he has 
warmth in his voice and sympathy in his eyes. 

He feels close to them. To him they are alive and 
vibrant and real, his friends, who have shared the tragedy 
of their love with him. They have shown him how love 
can hurt and because of the hurt they found, they have 
made him afraid to love. 

There is no doubt that Martini has given much thought 
to love. 



Probing the Reason Why the Glamorous llino martini 



30 




Nino Martini, famous star of grand 
of radio, concert, and more recently of 
motion pictures, in some interesting poses. 
Left, a studio portrait, showing a serious 
side. Next, with "Mother Schumann-Heink," 
herself a star of concert and opera and 
radio. Above, with Anita Louise, in a scene 
from a Fox film, "Here's to Romance." 



'Once, long ago, there was a girl in Italy," he said 
lowly and there was a remembered feeling in his voice. 
'It was the first time a girl had filled me with tenderness. 
More than that, we were friends. We understood each 
! )ther. There was always so much to say when we were 

I .ogether. 

"I thought then it would always be like that and when 
[ thought of the future I saw this girl as my wife, shar- 
ing my thoughts and love always. But I did not tell her 

II loved her or ask her to be my wife. 

"My career was only starting and I had nothing to offer 
her. And even then, young as I was, I had the convic- 
tion that it is unfair to a woman to ask her to become 
i engaged when the marriage must necessarily be years in 
the distance. 

"My work called me away and I was gone two years. 
When I returned again I could not wait to see her. But 
from the first moment I knew it was different. She still 
was beautiful, even more lovely than I had remembered, 
and she still had the charm and intelligence that had 
moved me so deeply. But something was gone. The 
tenderness, the quickening of my heart at her smile, all 
the little intangible things that are a part of love. 

"I was glad then I had not asked her to marry me. All 
my life I have wondered at men who say: '/ love you' 
to every girl who momentarily stirs them. For unless it 
lasts these words must be (Continued on page SI) 



has remained a bachelor. 



Returning by 
air from the 
coast, after 
a gratifying 
triumph, won 
in his first 
starring pic- 
ture, "Here's 
to Romance." 



Wide World 



31 



By * t,|Bl 



m 




tralto voice o{ the gfSdkd 

° PC ? on he wrist only ^-gg** lout, 
watch on ne \, It was haii 1 was 

nis budget «^" t e h -- s se ason. • ■ ,. er „ 00 „, last May. 

•fcV&gSt^iS rtu^^fe 

■fct^tos^ — h 



pride and hope- he hal «j* the goal ^ 

1 \t -i quarter to ^ ^ not ru h Q na o\ 

Up to** " wm ? " * thc > et -th that and her 

he rarnbitio« was work, and wrth ^ . 

friends, however, tg^ a i ^ t s 

Sore ^& p ri*^ she waS i 

clamor, she felt ? a preUrmnary 

at the Met. A • • to sing for Boat re- 

tiven an appointrnem her q 

^ e was excused^ ^ down to d 

hearsaV. 1" ;** * u ree minutes hetorc han(l sh * 

house, SS^S the "f^fcX singer jj 
time. And, " oW ervoUS . tense. An° tary cafef 
found herseH net moment. he her naml 



, eW seasu» - . uu t uc i-» . , vn ; c e spe^"-^ „, fif . (jmu""- 

^sssfctfffltf- ..... »* 



Helen looks V°" n ^ ou ,h 

feeling gay laughter- h a sked b« 

louse, * s ^,dt*at»«^e *»S S V 
'^something » s ing 

She wanted, ,< P 
r^hehad«ound.(C 

„„ t0 Grand 0P B 
from room w u 

r &\e ; ot *" ^ 
•„ "faust, ' . 

heiro >" to 



radio niuinvs gets. 



its mnn ! 




B y 



Below are four famous folk whom the 
radio has wooed with varying suc- 
cess. Chaplin's art of pantomime 
must await the advent of television. 
Fascinating Mae West awaits the 
proper vehicle for her rare gifts. 
Maestro Toscanini recently oonducted 
a symphony orchestra in an espe- 
cially prepared concert. And for- 
mer Queen Marie of Roumania, who 
came too soon and upset atbroadcost! 




Katharine Hepburn is 
mike-shy. She is one 
movie star who feels 
broadcasting hurts 
rather than helps her 
popularity with fans. 







And above are three popular favorites reluctant to 
broadcast. Chevalier had a fling at it, but he, like 
Katharine Hepburn, is mike-shy. Garbo will consent 
whenever satisfactory terms can be agreed upon. And 
sponsors would like very much to sign George Arliss. 



H Fascinating Tale of Radio's Quest for Celebrities. 
H Few Still Hold Out, but Some Day They'll Capitulate. 




LIKE the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. 
Radio always gets its man ! 

If you doubt it, get your newspaper and 
look at the radio programs. Count the celeb- 
rities — stars from Hollywood and Broadway, 
from Grand Opera and the concert stage . . . 
notables from the halls of government, from palaces 
and palazzos. They've all capitulated, except for a hand- 
ful of die-hards. 

There was a time when the presence of a star on a 
radio program was a rarity. But every year has seen 
radio raid the haunts of celebrities and bring them to 
the loudspeakers. 

Paderewski is a recent recruit. Two years ago he 
played once for the British Broadcasting Company, a 
performance short-waved to this country. When it was 
over, he swore never to do it again. 

"Too brutally mechanical," said the Polish pianist. 
But. the other day he changed his mind. He will play 
as at a concert, for an hour or more. The microphone 
can have all or part of his playing — but he won't play 
just one selection. 

George Arliss is another you never have heard — but 
that doesn't mean that he won't broadcast, some day. 
. Sponsors would like to sign him, but the figure has not 
yet been agreed upon. 

Greta Garbo, also, has indicated that she could be per- 
suaded, if a satisfactory agreement . could be reached. 

The only great violinist you haven't heard is Fritz 
Kreisler — the greatest of them all. His original objec- 
tion to radio was that transmission was poor and would 
distort his playing. Then he refused an offer because 
the proposed program included several comedians. Right 
now he won't talk business at any price. But we still 
hope to hear him on the air. and confidently expect it. 



Besides Kreisler. one other musical celebrity hangs 
back — Rachmaninoff, the justly famous Russian pianist. 
But he, too, may some day change his mind. 

Arturo Toscanini. unquestionably the greatest orches- 
tra conductor in the world, was on the air once only. His 
appearances with the Philharmonic don't count. The 
story goes that General Motors offered him plentv of 
money if he would lead their Sunday night concert — 
but he would not accept money. 

Then they offered him a 16-cylinder automobile deliv- 
ered to the door of his home in Milan, Italy — not quite 
realizing the kind of bargain they had made. 

This offer Toscanini accepted. 

The car cost $8,000 set up and ready to roll in Detroit. 
The duty on a car in Italy is exactly 125%. So, before 
counting shipping costs, the price of the gift already was 
$18,000. Now slap on a conservative $2,000 for trans- 
portation and it reaches a total of $20,000. Also, the 
automobile thus presented falls in the category of a gift, 
so its recipient pays no income tax on it. 

All of which puts the maestro at the top of the radio 
money-makers. 

As to royalty, all but a few have tumbled. The former 
German Kaiser is one man you have never heard. Re- 
cently, when asked to speak, he said: "My well-known 
principles of modesty forbid it." 

Stalin, top man in Soviet Russia, won't even answer 
the invitation to go on the air. Gandhi was difficult to 
get. Also the King of Siam. They dwelt so far away 
from wires and good radio facilities it was physically 
impossible to bring, them to you. However, when Gandhi 
came to London and Siam's monarch came to New York, 
they submitted gracefully. 

Which reminds me of Bertha Brainard's story of 
Queen Marie of Roumania's (Continued on page 95) 

35 





Rosemary Lane, who with her 
sister, Priscilla, contributes 
many a bright spot to the 
Fred Waring program, is one 
of the most winning of radio's 
younger stars. With an enor- 
mous zest for life, Rosemary 
finds everything interesting, 
even the long hours and hard 
work of rehearsals. It it 
that quality of enthusiasm 
which so delights listeners. 





feet Patti from Atlantic Cityl 
Iree months after her network 
t'but as a sustaining artist, 
ung Patti Chapin was engaged 
the featured singer on the 
amily Hotel" program, star- 
ng Jack Pearl. More recently 
le was established in her own 
ogram — heard every Mon- 
ay. Patti also is featured now on 
her outstanding broadcasts, 
lore's no keeping Patti down I 





By RUTH GERI 



nLL DAY the sun sears the plains of Eritrea with 
brutal, relentless fire, till at last night descends with 
its equally cruel frost. In their drab, brown tents, 
the Italian soldiers huddle together, wondering if 
it perhaps is not better to scorch all day! than to shiver all 
night. Over there, just a few feet over the border in 
Ethiopia, death may be hiding in ambush. But tonight 
it is Sunday and they are still alive and there must be 
amusement to distract a soldier from the grimness of 
war. The radio — cards — a cigarette. . . 

In the communications tent a serious, darkly handsome 
lieutenant bends over his receiving set. It is lucky, he 
thinks, that he is a sound-engineer and that the* set is 
perhaps the best in all Africa . . . 

Far away in Chicago, a friendly noonday sun shines 
down on the whiteness of the Wrigley Building rising 
from the banks of the Chicago River. Outside, leisurely 
strollers promenade Michigan Avenue on their way from 
church. Within, although it is Sunday, there is as much 
bustle as ever in the Columbia Broadcasting Studios, for 
radio knows no day of rest. 

A slim, blonde girl stands before a microphone. An 
engineer raises his hand. All right, take it away ! And 
the limpid, sweet voice of Vivien della Chiesa is loosed on 
the air waves, to bring beauty and joy into a million 
homes ; to go out even across a continent and an ocean to 
distant Africa. 

Surely it is a long way from Chicago to Ethiopia, and 
Premier Mussolini's quarrel with the Ethiopians is a 
dim, distant catastrophe which one reads about in the 
papers while enjoying a nice, warm breakfast. And yet 
from the silken-haired girl at the microphone in Chicago, 
to the dark, tragic Italian lieutenant bent breathlessly over 
his radio, there stretches a fragile, tenuous thread of 
sound, binding them with a golden cord of music and 
love. And if there is a shadow of a tear in her blue eyes 
as she sings the tender words of a love song, it is because 



Uiuien della Chiesa sings 
from Chicago to a lonely 
louer in a far-away land. 

UUHEI1 SHALL 
THEV mEE| 

ncnm? 



of the fear clutching at her heart for her loved one. An 
if he, in far off Africa, smiles as he catches the echo 
her beloved voice, it is because it is good to know that 
least she is safe and it is comforting to hear her sw^ 
tones in the wilderness. 

Love came riding over the waves to pretty eightee 
year-old Vivien della Chiesa on the wings of Balboa 
Armada — that splendid fleet of seaplanes which can 
bearing the good will of the Italian people to the Chicaj 
World's Fair in 1933. Vivien, just out of high schoi 
never dreaming that fame was to come to her so soo 
went down to Grant Park, with so many other I tali, 
girls, waving a flag and shouting a greeting. Almost ii 
mediately her interest centered in just one of all the han 
some, bronzed, intrepid fliers, who speedily were whisfe 
away for a royal reception. It didn't matter that thl 
were gone so soon. Vivien counted herself lucky inde 
that she would see hint again at the banquet where S 
was to sing, which was to he tendered the heroes by 
Italian organization to which her mother and fall 
belonged. 

She blushed prettily as all the dashing Italian visit- 



40 




yer his radio, 
the plains of 
itrea, young 
eu tenant Emil 
nardi of the 
a I i a n Army 
tars her loved 
ice. When will 
see her again? 



omplimented her for the 
eauty and charm of her voice, 
ut when he came she stood 
ere awkward and tongue-tied, 
le was curious about her name. 
)id she perhaps come from 
he town of Chiesa? he asked. 
'No, I was born right here 
Chicago and I've never been 
Italy, but my family come 
rom there — they take their 
ame from the village," she 
eplied, hating herself for 
lushing a deep crimson and 
hankful that she had studied 
er Italian so well. Of course, 
he had meant to use it only 

or the opera, but to what sweet purpose she now was 
mtting it! 

"But, how fortunate!" he exclaimed. "My family, too, 
ire from Chiesa!" 

Of course, Mr. and Mrs. della Chiesa must meet 
Jeutenant Emil Finardi, who was, so to speak, almost 
n neighbor. Certainly, they knew the Finardis although 
hey could not remember this Emil who must have been 
running around, no bigger than a tadpole, when they had 
left Italy for America. With true Italian hospitality, 
ifiVivien's mother greeted this son of an old friend, press- 
ing upon him eager invitations. But surely he must come 
to supper with them one night and tell them of his father 
and mother and eat good home-cooked vermicelli and 
spaghetti. 

If Mrs. Chiesa secretly nursed any matchmaking 
jijscheme for capturing so distinguished a son-in-law. it 
ijwas for Vera, her beautiful elder daughter. Vivien, too. 
itjwhen she dared to think at all, sighed hopelessly ; for what 



Illustrated by Ralph Shepard 



chance had she, little more than a schoolgirl, against her 
sister? But from the first Emil had eyes only for Vivien, 
whose hair was the color of sweet, yellow Lombardy wine 
and eyes like blue Italian lakes and a voice which rightly 
should one day echo in the famous La Scala — Vivien, 
who was yet but a baby, as mama said. 

But at eighteen one is not too young to understand the 
quickening of the heart and the unspoken words in a 
man's eyes, and so quickly (for time was so pitifully 
short) these two — young Vivien {Continued on page 66) 

41 



SECRETS 

of the 
LUX RADIO 
THEATRE 



The first program 
to broadcast full 
length plays with M 
famous stage stars Jm 



By Dora v 




Albert 




Not even the volatile Lupe Velez is 
temperamental when she goes on the 
air for the Lux Radio Theatre. For 
her it is a most thrilling experience. 




USICAL COMEDIES may come and go on the 
air, but there is one dramatic program, the Lux 
I Radio Theatre, which seems destined to go on 
forever. It has brought us John Boles and Miriam Hop- 
kins in "Seventh Heaven." Tallulah Bankhead's "Let Us 
Be Gay," Claudette Colbert's "Holiday," Leslie Howard's 
"Romantic Age," Wallace Beery's inimitable portrait of 
"Lightnin'," and Helen Hayes' tender "Peg o' My Heart." 
Over forty hit shows have been produced already, and 
there's a new one on the boards each week. 

Already the program, which started last October, has 
built up three legends, the Broadway legend, the legend 
of America and the Hollywood legend. Probably Broad- 
way has the sanest viewpoint. It regards the Lux Radio 
Theatre as the smartest bit of dramatic showmanship on 
42 



the air, and also as a glittering show window where 
Broadway topnotchers c£n parade their wares. To Amer- 
ica at large the Lux Radio Theatre is a glorified road 
show, bringing Broadway to the most isolated sections 
of the country. Hollywood sees it as an opportunity 
for a grand and glorious week-end, an exciting and 
thrilling house-party created for the special benefit of 
Hollywood stars. Lupe Velez flies to New York, dashes 
around town, appears for one thrilling hour on the air, 
earns enough money to pay for a whole week's jamlxiree! 

At any rate, everyone agrees that the Lux Radio Theatre 
is unique. It has brought more stars into one studio than 
any other program. It has produced more fireworks, 
more comedy, and more heartache behind the scenes than 
any other program. 

You've heard that Wallace Beery worked with his sus- 
penders hanging down over his great fat stomach. Re- 
member that? It's a symbol. Speaking figuratively, al' 
the stars worked that way. 

Claudette Colbert lay down in the middle of the re- 
hearsal right on the floor of the studio — said it he1pe( 
to straighten her spine when she lay that way. 

Tallulah Bankhead has claustrophobia (fear of small 
confined spaces), so she couldn't bear to stay in owl 
room for an hour at a time. During the middle oip| 
rehearsal she would take a walk round the block. 



Jose Reyes 



J. B. Scott 



Scotty Welbourne 



John Boles (top), who played in 
"Seventh Heaven" on the radio. 
(Lower picture) Leslie Howard, 
the star of "Berkeley Square." 



Two other favorites of the Lux 
Radio Theatre. (Top) James Cagney. 
(Lower picture) Wallace Beery, the 
popular star of "The Old Soak." 



Ruth Chatterton (top) did "The 
Lion and the Mouse." Miriam 
Hopkins (lower picture) co- 
starred in "Seventh Heaven." 



first introduction to the other people in her cast and to 
her director was amazing. The studio was located in an 
out-of-the-way spot, so she hunted all over the place for 
it. Then she stuck her head into the room and yelled. 
"For heaven's sake, you so-and-sos, how the devil did 
you find this place?" 

The actors do all they can to help themselves and the 
rest of the cast get the illusion of a real show. When 
Ina Claire played a dual role in "Polly with a Past," she 
wore a black hat and lots of pearls for her role as 
Paulette, the adventuress, but took off her hat and pearls 
when she played simple, sweet Polly. When Paul Muni 
said he was accustomed to grabbing his hat in a certain 
scene in "Counsellor-at-Law," they gave him a hat rack 
to play with. 

James Cagney wasn't the least bit temperamental. He 
said he was a little tired of socking ladies with grapefruit, 
but he was perfectly willing to have one of the actresses 
in the cast sock him with a grapefruit as a publicity gag. 

The most amazing thing about the Lux Radio Theatre, 
however, is not the glamour of the personalities involved, 
fascinating as they are, but the fact that anyone had the 
courage to put the program on the air at all. The idea 
of a dramatic show wasn't new, but nobody ever had 
ventured to try it before. There was too much money 
and time involved; it was too big a gamble. When an 



agency, which had considered the idea for years, finally 
decided to try it, all the wise guys along Broadway hooted. 

"Who'll listen to a full-hour dramatic show?" they 
clamored. "Why, it's insane ! It's ridiculous ! Music 
is what people want. No one can ever make America 
sit still and listen to drama for one solid hour." 

I was among the people who thought the idea would 
be a failure. As did thousands of other people far wiser, 
far more experienced in radio show business than I. 

But the hour went on the air. On October 14th, 1934, 
Miriam Hopkins and John Boles appeared in "Seventh 
Heaven." The atmosphere of the studio was as tense as 
if this were the premiere of a great Broadway play. There 
were no dowagers present in ermine, it is true. There 
were no bald-headed men watching the play from the 
front row. There were no women from the upper crust 
of society in the audience, loaded down with pearls. In 
fact, there was no audience at all, save three or four men 
who had moulded the program. 

But everything else that belongs to a first night was 
there. The fear. The uncertainty. The tenseness and 
the excitement. The leading lady tearing a handkerchief 
to pieces in her nervousness, going through every gesture, 
every movement as though she were appearing on a real 
stage instead of just before a mike that had ears, but no 
eyes with which to see her. At the (Continued on page 70) 

43 




frhhces 



JOE 



Two favorites of the air 
now are teamed by Para- 
mount in their new musi- 
cal picture, "Collegiate." 
Joe Penner, the duck man, 
and Frances Langford, 
sparkling contralto of ra- 
dio, will both be seen and 
heard in this most de- 
lightful comedy of events 
that transpire when Jack 
Oakie inherits a girls' 
school. Frances was no- 
tably successful in her 
first movie, "Every Night 
at Eight." And she will 
continue to function as 
one of the glittering gal- 
axy of "Hollywood Hotel." 



GLHDVS 



JOHH 



Loveiy Gladys Swarthout, 
star of the Metropolitan 
Opera, and star of the 
air-waves, now is one of 
the principals, with John 
Boles, in Paramount Pic- 
tures' musical romance, 
"The Rose of the Rancho." 
The stars are pictured 
here in a between-scenes 
chat at the studio ranch, 
where they were engaged 
in filming a gay fiesta 
scene which climaxes the 
picture. The huge som- 
brero which Miss Swarth- 
out is holding is one of 
several which she uses in 
her "Sombrero Dance." 



IF I WERE 




miCHTV 
I110GUL 




Fred Alien 



// / were the mighty 
mogul of the airwaves: 

All lone cowboys in ra- 
dio would have to find a 
friend. This would stop 
them from being lonesome 
and assure them of at least one 
listener. 

All bridge experts who explain in- 
tricate plays over the air would be 
made dummy for the duration of the 
series. 

The Secretary of Agriculture would 
be contacted regarding a back-to-the- 
farm movement for radio hill-billies. 
This would make it possible to walk 
around Radio City without tripping 
over banjos and ten-gallon hats. It 
would also send a lot of yodelers back 
to the 'hills of the Bronx. 

A new day would dawn for an- 
nouncers. The Allen-controlled pro- 
gram would have no commercial sales 
talk. 

Under my system the selling would 
be done in the listener's home. An- 
nouncers throughout the country 
would hurry from dwelling to dwell- 
ing, tapping on the door and asking 
folks what they're tuning in on. 
"Bide-a-Wee Biscuits, starring Noel 
Coward," the folks might say. Right 
away the announcers rattle off the 
Bide-a-Wee sales talk. This puts 
thousands more announcers to work. 
They wear out thousands more shoes. 
46 




The author goes 
into action before 
the mike — with 
his prescription 
for ridding radio 
of some of its 
chief annoyances. 



Wide World 




Three glimpses of Fred Allen in his new movie, 
"Thanks a Million," starring Dick Powell. Above, 
a dramatic scene with Patsy Kelly and RubinofF. 



It looks as if Bennie Baker were beating the 
drum to frighten the rain away. Not such a 
bad idea, at that, if you can do it, Bennie I 



That wise and genial philosopher of Town 
Hall fame, Fred Mien, speaks oat of turn. 




Which puts thousands more tanners to work. 
Which plays the devil with the mortality rate 
among cattle — but who cares? 

I would also take the amateur situation in 
hand. Gongs must go. They should be re- 
stored to their rightful owners — Chinese 
mandarins — whose servants whang them to 
announce callers and dinner. I would spon- 
sor a series of programs on which well-known 
amateurs give professionals a break. They 
would hold professional contests and the win- 
ners would have a chance to appear on the 
amateur vaudeville units which are sweeping 
the country. 

I would take drastic steps in overhauling 
the comedy situation. All big brpadcasting 
buildings would have de luxe barber shops, 
where the comics would be forced to have 
the whiskers snipped off their jokes. No gag 
writer could sell the same joke to more than 
three funny men at the same time. There 
would be a Mae West joke to end all Mae 
West jokes. 

All jokes would be brought up to date. To 
wit: "The neighborhood was so tough that 
when the goldfish got hungry they climbed 
out of their bowls and chased the cats up 
alleys." The neighborhood, when I finished 
with it, would be so tough that when the 
cats got hungry they hi- jacked a milkman. 

When Eddie Cantor and I, as children, 
were playing before packed houses — on the 
sidewalk in front of tenements — they used 
to define college-bred as a four-year loaf. 

Fancied up for modern usage, college 
eraduation becomes a ceremonv where stu- 



dents get a sheepskin after four years of 
wool-gathering. 

On second thought I'd end up by sending 
all radio comedians to a nudist camp — just 
because I like the comic strips, Graham ! 

Blues singers would be given something 
to cry about. My staff would hire Jersey 
mosquitoes who'd got melancholia from bit- 
ing vacationing blue bloods. These doleful 
little winged fellows would be kept on hand 
in case the singer unconsciously fell into a 
happy mood. At the first sign of gaiety, 
drilling would begin and the young lady soon 
would become as sad as a fan dancer when 
the moulting season comes. 

Character actors would be limited to a 
dozen voices each. This would put more of 
them to work and reduce the breadline, 
where for months they've been causing dis- 
turbances by returning for third and fourth 
helpings, each time under another disguise. 

Symphony orchestras would be directed 
by men with pronounceable names. If it's 
impossible to find a baton-waver named 
Smith, let his name be changed. This would 
immediately increase the popularity of classi- 
cal music. People would be able to say : 
"Did you hear Smith conducting the Phil- 
harmonic last night ?" Instead of : "Did you 
hear Vlad-er — that Russian — er — skip it." 

Kiddie hours would be presented in much 
larger studios. These would accommodate 
all parents and relatives. Then the programs 
wouldn't have to be broadcast. 

Script shows continued from week to 
week would end {Continued on page 78) 

47 







Richard Himber, the maestro of the 
Studebaker Champions, radio's four- 
star feature, directs his orchestra. 



-J 



A museum wanted Vallee's first megaphone, 
so Dick returned the one Rudy had given 
him when he was Rudy's orchestra manager. 



TO THIS day Ted Husing 
doesn't know how it happened — 
just who it was that yanked him 
out of bed, like clockwork, every 
fifteen minutes, one dreary morn- 
ing. When Ted, tired from a late 
broadcast, wanted nothing more 
than a nice morning's snooze. 

The first phone call to break 
the sound of his rhythmic snoring 
came at 5 :30 A. M. In case you'd 
like to know, just at that moment 
Mr. Richard Himber, as dignified- 
appearing and studious-looking a 
gentleman as ever trod on shoe 
leather, was in the Pennsylvania 
station, on the last lap of his per- 
sonal appearance tour. 

The phone rang again, like the 
clang of a fire bell. It kept on 
ringing. Sleepily Ted reached for 
it. A stern voice said : "This is 
Western Union calling. We have a wire to call 
you at 5 :30 A. M. today." 

"What?" veiled the outraged Ted 
take !" 

"Sorry, sir," said Richard Himber, and hung up. 

5 :45 A. M. Ted Husing's phone rang again. 
This time a high-pitched, girlish voice said cheer- 
ily : "Good morning, Mr. Husing. This is Postal 
Telegraph. It is 5:45 A. M. We have a call to 
wake you then." 

I don't have to tell you what Ted answered. By 
this time he realized it was a gag. 

Hut Dick wasn't through, not by a long shot. At 
6 A. M. Ted was back in bed when the phone rang 
ominously. "This is RCA Communications." said 
a low-pitched, he-mannish voice. "We have a call 
to ring Columbus 4-5450 at 6 A. M." 

Then Husing let loose. He was furious. And 
his vocabulary is pretty extensive when he loses his 
temper. "I pity the jokester when I lay my hands 
on him !" he yelled. 

Having done his good deed for the day. Himher 
went about his business. 

This is the same Dick Himher, paradox, who took 
an unemployed musician, who was desperate, and 



Philanthropist, 
practical joker, 
firm friend, stern 
foe-Dick Himber! 



By m a r y 
Jacobs 



"It's a mis- 



gave him a job. At a small salary,' 
it is true, but sufficient to keep his 
wife and baby. 

For two weeks he kept this 
young violinist on his payroll, and' 
the young man's fingers were all j 
thumbs. Now that he had got; 
his chance, he was too nervous tql 
make the most of it — to make any] 
kind of a showing. 

Now Himber hates discord inJ 
music. His sensitive ear will de~| 
tect the slightest sharping of a 
note. Toward the other members' 
of the band, when they played off-! 
key, he showed no mercy. Yet, 
never a word of reproach did he 
utter to this boy. 

Three weeks passed. Still the 
young violinist was no goodJ 
Then one day Himber sent for 
him. Tremblingly, the violinist 
came to his office, certain that this meant dismissal 
— the end. 

When he entered, Himber handed him a roll of 
money — $1,500, to be exact. "Would you mind 
depositing this in the bank for me?" Himber said,| 
"I'm busy." There was his secretary. There was 
his arranger. There was the office boy. All of 
them Himber had known for a long while. All of 
them he could trust. Yet he chose to hand $1,500 
to this comparative stranger ! 

"And," he added, "I've been watching your 
work, kid, and you're doing fine. Beginning with 
next week you get a five-dollar raise." 

I don't have to tell you that the violinist did a 
Marathon to the bank. And that the next da] 
when he came to rehearsal, all his nervousness was 
gone. He just had to make good. And he has! 

When I mentioned this incident to Himber, good- 
natured, fat, indolent-looking, he blushed like i 
child, squirmed and said : "Aw, forget it. I didn'' 
know anyone knew al)out that. The kid just lackec 
self-confidence, that was all. Anyone would hav«| 
done the same." 

The most unusual, most paradoxical figure alon;| 
Radio Row, Dick Himber, (Continued on page 58*1 



48 



ossip ht n GLnncE 



Birthday Weight Height Hair Married? 



Birthday Weight Height Hair Married? 



Jan. 27 


138 


5' 7'/2" 


Gold 


She says 
"No" 


Benay Venuta 

She's the reason gals want to crash radio, is 
Benay. From $100 a week to more than a thou- 
sand per in six months makes the dough she has 
to spend to stay slim seem very little indeed. 
But it isn't. 


April 1 


163 


6" 0" 


Black 


Very 



Eddie Duchin 

It's costing Eddie plenty not to play in the ritzy 
Central Park Casino. Because it had an exclu- 
sive contract on his services, it gets $30,000 of 
his dough. And just when he got himself all 
married) 




July 10 



120 



5" 7V2" 



Red- 
Brown 



Yes-s-s 



Helen Pickens 

This gorgeous gal gets more proposals of mar- 
riage through the mail than either of her sisters, 
and she's the only one married. Unless, that is, 
Patti Pickens and Bob Simmons have done it. 



Aug. 7 



155 



5' 5'/2" 



Brown 



He is 



Mark Warnow 

His first conducting was done in such a rush he 
used a yellow pencil to pace the fiddles, saxes 
and what have you. So now he's superstitious, 
and won't use a baton if he can help it. 



July 8 


115 


5' 4" 


Dark 
Brow* 


Nope 




July 16 


190 


6 1 0" 


Dark 
Brown 


No 


Gertrude Niesen 

Sultry Gert, who has been singing to exceptional 
business on a coast-to-coast tour, is on the air 
by now — if she has ironed out a private little war 
which she was having with Columbia. 


Floyd Gibbons 

He went to Ethiopia to report a war and left 
behind a rather disturbed battlefield. A big 
advertiser had planned to sponsor a show with 
him as emcee. The fight for the job was a 
battle royal. 


May 2 


170 


5' 9" 


Brown 


Yes. 
with kids 




i 


Feb. 19 


no 


5" 3'/2" 


Chestnut 


See item 


Bing Crosby 

An ironic note on Bing: Last month you read 
how he appeared with Whiteman for nix? Well, 
in a week or so, he takes over Paul's show. How- 
ever, the King of Jazz has another program on 
all set to go. 




Connie Gates 

This gal, reported engaged to an important CBS 
exec, takes her transport pilot test just after 
you read this. Roscoe Turner and Swanee Taylor, 
air aces, have groomed her for it. 


Jan. 21 


115 


5' 4" 


Blonde 


No 




Mar. 29 


220 


6" Va" 


Brown 


See item 



Bernice Claire 

This devoted dotter has bought the folks a ranch 
in California. Check on that birthday item, be- 
cause lots of people send her gifts during the 
blustery month of March — and they shouldn't. 



Paul Whiteman - 

Paul now explains that he loses weight by eating 
what he shouldn't, then worrying about whether 
or not his wife is going to find out about it. He 
once tipped the beam at around 300 lbs. 



Doesn't 



135 



5" 6" 



Light 
Brown 



See below 



Deems Taylor 

This easy-talking humorist should be a groom by 
now. Incidentally, he arrives at that glib way 
of being funny by saying his lines over and over 
in rehearsal — -like a stuck phonograph record. 




May 26 



160 



5" 10" 



Brow* 



You bet 



Al Jolson 

It comes out that Jolie made a recent guest 
appearance in which he said only: "Good eve- 
ning, ladies and gentlemen;" then, "Thank you." 
Ben Bernie sent him this wire: "You were never 
better." 




Aug. 20 



200 



5' 9'/2" 



Brown 



Yes 



Teddy Bergman 

There's a little irony in this. Teddy got his first 
air break with Rudy Vallee. So now, that he has 
his own program, it has to go on in opposition 
to the Crooner's hour of variety. 




July 18 



105 



5'2" 



Blonde 



See item 



Martha Mears 

Her little baby, which weighed in a while back 
at eight pounds on birth, will rarely see mom and 
pop together. Bill Brokaw, the pop, is with Ozzie 
Nelson and plays at night, while mom is busy 
all day. 



July 10 



180 



5'8V2" 



Brown 



Yep 



Graham McNamee 

The old softie has been laid up a long time as 
the result of a scooter accident. Absolutely. 
While announcing the Soap Box Derby in Day- 
ton, he was hit by a runaway home-made auto. 



July 22 



128 



5" 6" 



Dark 
Brown 



Nope 



Shirley Howard 

Instead of taking an ordinary vacation, the lovely 
Shirley voyaged clear to South America. She is 
due back any day now and will immediately step 
into a featured spot at NBC, they say. 



49 



RADIO STARS 

Euerything's baked for the 
Bakers! Rnd their Ouen- 
meal suggestions are grand! 

By nancy Wood 





Wide World Photos 



Campfirc Marshmallows 



YEARS ago, in Fall River, Mass., to 
be exact, a young boy by the name of 
Phil Bajter earned the large sum of 
one dollar for an act he put on in the 
local vaudeville house there. And to 
this day Phil remembers that ninety 
cents of that hard-earned dollar went 
for a single meal — the first square meal 
he had had in days ! 

Quite a feast, that must have been, 
although details of the dishes he ordered are now sadly 
lacking. But I dare say they included some of the same 
dishes that he likes to this day. For though Phil Baker 
nowadays is "tops" in the field of entertainment and, with 
his new Gulf program on Sunday nights, has one of the 
best and most highly-paid spots on the air, his food tastes 
have changed but little from the time when a single dollar 
bill represented his entire earthly wealth. 

That is true of most well-known people in the Radio 
game, I find. Whereas you may hear colorful (and pos- 
sibly exaggerated) tales of Wall Street plungers who 
celebrate a killing in the market with champagne din- 
ners, roast pheasant and out-of-season delicacies, you'll 
seldom find a Radio star splurging that way. If he once 
liked corn beef and cabbage — back in the days before a 



Isn't this a fine little familyl Phil 
Baker, holding "A*lgy" on his knee, 
"Little Miss Muffet" in her high 
chair, and Peggy (Mrs. Baker). 
And (left) not a comedian in the 
kitchen, Phil demonstrates his 
Nova Scotia scrambled-eggs dish. 
(Top) Novel pie for Thanksgiving. 



sponsor and a coast-to-coast hook-up 
boosted him into the money class — the 
star of the air-waves sees no reason to 
pretend that he now prefers caviar, 
Crepes Suzette and the like. The idea 
that success (and consequent affluence) 
changes a fellow (or gal) into an ep- 
icure and food faddist overnight is en- 
tirely false in most cases. Certainly the 
foods Phil Baker likes to this day are 
the simplest sort imaginable. Actually only one odd, ex-, 
pensive, dish was mentioned in all our conversation about 
the things he likes to eat. 

But let's hurry on out to Phil's home for an inter- 
view. Doubtless you are as curious as I was to inspect 
his new house, as well as to learn about his food pref- 
erences. 

The Bakers live in a lovely large, white house with 
green shutters, in a New York suburb overlooking Long 
Island Sound. I half expected to have "Bottle." that im- 
peccable butler of Phil's broadcasts, greet me at the door 
of the house, but there is no man-servant to "buttle" for 
Baker off the air. Instead, a quiet colored girl opened 
the door and ushered me into the homtv living-room with 
its cheery scheme of bright (Continued on pagi 72) 



RRRIO STARS' [OORIHC SCHOOL 

SO 



"I enjoy the added zest that comes with smoking a Camel 

Mrs. Jasper Morgan 




When not occupying her town 
house, Mrs. Morgan is at West- 
bury, Long Island. "Mildness is 
important in a cigarette," she 
says. "I'm sure that is one reason 
every one is enthusiastic about 
Camels. And I never tire of their 
flavor." The fact that Camels are 
milder makes a big difference. 



Young Mrs. Jasper Morgan's town 
house is one of the most individual 
in New York, with the spacious charm 
of its two terraces. "Town is a busy 
place during the season," she says. 
"There is so much to do, so much 
entertaining. And the more people 
do, the more they seem to smoke — 

AMONG THE MANY DISTINGUISHED WOMEN 
WHO PREFER CAMEL'S COSTLIER TOBACCOS: 

MRS. NICHOLAS BIDDLE, Philadelphia 

MISS MARY BYRD, Richmond 

MRS. POWELL CABOT, Boston 

MRS. THOMAS M. CARNEGIE, JR., New York 

MRS. J. GARDNER COOLIDGE, II, Boston 

MRS. ERNEST DU PONT, JR., Wilmington 

MRS. HENRY FIELD, Chicago 

MRS. CHISWELL DABNEY LANGHORNE, Virginia 
MRS. JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, New York 
MRS. POTTER D'ORSAY PALMER, Chicago 
MRS. BROOKFIELD VAN RENSSELAER, New York 

t 1935. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Winston. Salem, N. C. 



and certainly Camels are the popular 
cigarette. If I'm tired from the rush 
of things, I notice that smoking a 
Camel revives my energy in a pleasant 
way. And I find their flavor most agree- 
able." Camel spends millions more 
every year for finer, more expensive 
tobaccos. Get a "lift" with a Camel. 





In summer Mrs. Morgan is keenly 
interested in yachting. "Another 
thing that makes me like Camels 
so much," she says, "is that they 
never affect my nerves. I suppose 
that is because of the finer tobac- 
cos in Camels." Smoking Camels 
never upsets your nerves. 



Camels are Milder!. ..made from finer, more expensive tobaccos 
...Turkish and Domestic. ..than any other popular brand 



RADIO STARS 




Which is Yours? 

' f ° de when casting un 

«' tissues are stimulated 

Prevent d a ° d new on <* 

5 SSfbSs, :&«•■ 

an d oH gland /Xactfve neSS 

•JSarssasf— 

^ned up anTst?^? 




Miss Constance Hall says: "Pond's Cold Cream keeps my skin clear and fine. 



Where skin faults st<M r 

the underskin. tiny Lrves Z,, 1 " 
blood vessels and elandta £ ' 
outer skin flawless sE„% ke ? p 
startwhenthisund^sUsup 1 ! 



P"* »™ '>fi >» to Under Skin 




o^ter s£m bloom... Faultless! 



Deep-skin Cream 

reaches beginnings of 
Common Skin Faults 

What annoys you most when you 
peer into the mirror? 

Blackheads dotting your nose? 
Lines on forehead? Little blemishes? 
If you could only start new — with a 
satin-clear skin! 

And you can! — by putting new life 
into your underskin! There's where 
skin faults begin. And there's where 
you must work to get rid of them. 

Your underskin is made up of tiny 
nerves, blood vessels, glands and fibres. 
Kept active — they rush life to your 
outer skin — free it of flaws. Annoying 
lines, blackheads, blemishes are a sign 
your underskin is losing its vigor! 

To keep that underskin pulsating 
with life — stimulate it deep with 
Pond's Cold Cream. Made of specially 
processed oils, it seeps down the pore 



through cloggings of dirt. ..make-up... 
skin secretions. Out they flow — leaving 
your skin fresher, immediately clearer. 

But Pond's Cold Cream does still 
more! Pat in more cream briskly. Cir- 
culation quickens, little glands get 
busy. Now pores reduce, blemishes 
go away, lines begin to fade! 

A double-benefit treatment 

Every Night, pat in Pond's Cold Cream to 
uproot clogging make-up and dirt. Wipe 
off. Now pat in fresh Cream — for under- 
skin stimulation! 

Every Morning, and before make-up, re- 
fresh your skin with Pond's Cold Cream. 
It smooths your skin for powdering. 

Pond's Cold Cream is absolutely pure. 
Germs cannot live in it. 

Special 9-Trearment Tube 

POND'S, Dept. M128 Clinton Conn.. lencloselOi 
fto cover postage and packing) for special tube of 
Pond's Cold Cream, enough for o treatments, with 
generous samples of 2 other Pond's Creams anJ 
5 different shades of Pond's Face Powder. 



Street. 
City_ 



State. 

Copyrigbl. 1986, Pond's Exi 



53 



RADIO STARS 






With Buck Rogers and Wilma Peering in the 25th Century goes loyal Tag-a-Long. 



Dear Junior Listeners: 

On this page you will find the 
latest programs. And bits of news 
of popular child stars of the radio. 

7:30 A.M. EST (V±) — Jolly Bill and Jane. 

NBC Service to WEAF only. 
(Monday to Saturday inclusive.) 
8:00 EST (V4> — Spareribs — children's stories 
with Malcolm Claire. 

NBC Service Chicago to WEAF and net- 
work. 

(Monday to Saturday Inclusive.) 
8:18 EST (V4) — Pals — children's dramatic 
sketch. 

NISC Service to W.IZ and network. 
(Monday to Saturday inclusive.) 
9:00 EST (1) — Sunday Morning at Aunt 
Susan's. 

(Sundays onlv.) 

WABC WADC WOKO WGR CKLW 
WFBM WCAU WEAN WFBL WMBR 
WQAM WDBO WGST WPG WLBZ KLRA 
WFEA WHEC WLAC WDSU WDBJ 
WMAS WIBX WWVA WSPD WORC 
WDNC WHP WDOD WNAC WKRC WHK 
WJAS WBIG WBRC WICC WBNS CKAC 
WREC WTOC WS.IS WSEA. 

9:00 EST (1) — Coast to Coast on a Bus of 
the White Rahhit Line. Milton J. Cross 
conducting. 
(Sundays only.) 
W.IZ and associated stations. 

9:30 EST (%) — Junior Radio Journal — Bill 
Slater. 

(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 
10:30 EST (V*) — Let's Pretend — Children's 
Program. 

(Saturday only.) 

WABC WADC WAAB WKRC WHK KLZ 
WCAU WEAN WFBL WSPD WJSV WDBO 
WICC WBT KVOR WBNS WOC WOWO 
WREC WDSU WMBD KTSA WTOC 
WIBW CFRB KTUL WIBX KG KO WS.IS 
WKBN WDAE WMBG WCOA WOKO 
WKBW WDRC WDNC WSBT WMAS 
WCAO WA('<i WFEA KLRA WDOD 
WQAM WFBM WMBR WNOX WHP 
WLAC WSFA KSL KOMA KWKH WLBZ 
WHIG KFH WDB.T WGST WORC KRLD 
KSCJ CKLW WJAS WSMK WBBM 
WWVA. 

11:00 EST (1) — Horn and Ilardarl's Children's 
Hour. Juvenile Variety Program. 

(Sunday only.) 
WABC only 

11:30 EST («/i)— Mrs. Wiggs of the Cahhage 
Patch. Dramatic Sketch. Sponsored hv 
Wyeth Chemical Co., Inc. — Jad Salts. 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 

WABC WKBW WBBM WHK WCAU 

KMOX. 

56 



12:15 EST (V4)— The Gumps. Radio Sketch. 
Sponsored by Corn Products Refining Co. 
— I mil. Karo, Mazola and Kre-Mel. 

(Monday. Wednesdav and Friday.) 
WABC WOKO WCAO WNAC WGR 
WBBM WKRC WHK KRNT CKLW WDRC 
KMBC KFAB WHAS WCAU WJAS WEAN 
KMOX WFBL WJSV KERN KM J KHJ 
KOIN KFBK KGB KFRC KDB KOL 
KFPY KWG KVI WGST WBRC WBNS 
KRLD KLZ WOWO KTRH KLRA WREC 
WCCO WDSU KOMA KSL KTSA KSCJ 
WMAS. 

4:00 EST 04)— Betty and Bob — dramatis 
sketch. 

(Tuesday. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday ) 
NBC Service Chicago Studios to: 
WJZ WBZ W.IH WHAM KDKA KOIL 
WBZA WOAI WMAL WSYR WENR 
KVOO WKY KPRC KOA KDYL KPO 
KFI WBAP KG W KO.MO K HQ WBAL. 

4:30 EST — Our Barn — Children's Program 
with Madge Tucker. 
(Saturday only.) 
WEAF and network. 

5:30 EST (»/,) — The Singing Lady — nursery 
jingles, songs and stories. 
(Monday to Friday inclusive ) 
W.IZ WBAL WBZ WBZA WHAM KDKA 
WGAR W.IR WLW CRCT CFCF WEIL 
WMAL WSYR. 

5:30 EST 04) — Jack Armstrong, All Amer- 
ican Boy. 

(Monday to Friday Inclusive.) 

WABC WOKO WNAC WDRC WCAU 

W.IAS WEAN WMAS. 6:30 — WBBM 

WCAO WGR WHK CKLW WJSV WOWO 

Wll IOC WFBL. 
5:30 EST (%) — Children's dramatic program 

with Tom Mix — Ralston Purina Co. 

WEAF WEEI WTIC W.I AH WTAG WCSH 

KYW WFBR WRC WC.Y WREN WCAE 

WTAM WW.I WSAI WIIIO. 
5:45 EST (V 4 )— Og. Son of Eire. Children's 

Dramatic Stories. (Mbby, McNeill and 

Llbby.) 

(Monday, Wednesday and Friday.) 
WABC WCAO WAAB WKBW WKRC 
W.IK WHAS W.IAS Wlllli' WBT \\ BNS 
WREC. 

5:45 est (',)— Little Orphan Annie — child- 
hood playlet. 

(Monday to Friday Inclusive.) 
W.IZ WBZ WBZA KDKA WBAL WOAK 
W RVA WIOD WJAX WHAM W.IH WCKY 
WMAL WFLA CRCT CFCF. 6:4;", — KWK 
KOIL WKBF KSTP WBBC KFYR WSM 
WMC WSB WKY KPRC WOAI KTBS 
WAVE WSMR WBAB. 
5:15 EST <•:,) — The Adventures of Sam and 
Dick — sketch. 

(Monday, Wednesday and Friday.) 
NBC Service to WEAF nnd network. 
(1:00 EST («/,) — Animal News Club— children's 
program featuring Lou Rogers, cartoonist 
and entertainer. 



(Wednesday only.) 

NBC Service to W.IZ and network. 
6:00 — EST — Orgets in the Air. 

(Tuesdays only.) 

WEAF and network. 
6:00 EST (%) — Buck Rogers in the 25th 

Century. 

(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.* 
WABC WOKO WPAO WAAB WKBW 
WKRC W HK CKLW WCAU W.IAS WFBL 
WJSV W BNS WHEC. 

6:15 EST («4) — "Og, Son of Fire." 

(Mondav. Wednesday and Friday.) 
W I IBM KRNT K MBC K M< 'X 

6:15 EST (%) — Bobby Benson and Sunny Jim. 
(Mondav. Wednesday, Friday.) 
WABC WOKO WAAB WGR WDRC 
WCAU WEAN WFBL WHEC W MAS 
WLBZ. 

6:30 EST (',)— Jack Armstrong. All Amer- 
ican Boy. (General Mills, Inc. — Wheatles.) 
(From Chicago.) 

(Monday to Friday inclusive.) 
WBBM KMOX WCCO. 
6:45 EST (%) — Billy and Betty — dramatic 
sketch. 

(Mondav to Friday Inclusive.) 
NBC Service to WEAF onlv. 

7:00 EST (>/,)— Buck Rogers in the 25th Cen- 
tury. (Cocomalt.) 
(Mon., Tups,. Wed. and Thurs.) 
W FILM W" HAS KMOX WCCO. 

7:15 EST (',) — Pnpeye. the Sailor (Whcalena 
Corp.). 

WEAF and basic network. 
(Thursday and Saturday.) 

Hews notes 

Tag-a-Long Johnstone, whose picture you 
see at the top of this page, made his air 
debut on Monday, September 23rd. His 
master, lack Johnstone, writes the stories for 
the Buck Rogers program. 

Do you know who plays Eddie, the blind 
boy, in the Maxwell House Show Boat pro- 
gram? It is our old friend, Walter Tetleyl 
Walter has been in radio for six years now. 
Because of his work, he can't go to school. 
Instead, he has a private tutor. 

Mary Small retuined to the air on Sep- 
tember 25th in a new series of broadcasts. 
Mary spent the summer at Atlantic City, 
as mistress of ceremonies at Mary Small's 
Little Playhouse on the Steel Pier. 

Billy Idelson, who plays Rush Meadows 
in the "Vic and Sade" program, loves dogs. 
He has two of which he is extremely fond 



RADIO STARS 



ARE MATCHING LIPS 
AND FINGER TIPS 




Narural 
N< " Ur Wail P» lish 



•„,al Na'l 1 



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making in it that appeals to every wom- 
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World's Manicure Authority. 



Cardinal 



The new Cutex Lipstick is just as ex- 
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And it stays on — without drying your 
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Get Cutex Liquid Polish . . . Crime or 
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Start off with your favorite shade of 
Cutex Polish and matching Cutex Lip- 
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venture in smartness it turns out to be! 
Begin today! 

Northam Warren, New York, Montreal, London, Paris 



CUTEX 



57 



RADIO STARS 



KQOL 

MILDLY MENTHOLATED 
CIGARETTES- CORK-TIPPED 




THOSE cork tips please your lips. The 
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throat. Finally, the B & W coupon in each 
pack of KQDLS is a constant source of 
gratification. Save them; they are good 
for a choice of attractive items of nation- 
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., Louisville, Ky. 
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~Tke ftatadoxlcal Alt. 4jimbet 



(Continued from page 48) 



1 5* /& TWENTY 



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58 



the Studebaker Champion maestro, is gen- 
erous to a fault. The best-natured, most 
easy going guy in the world. And the per- 
son I'd like least of all to have as an 
enemy. 

He hates people who come late for ap- 
pointments ; yet he is invariably late. He 
doesn't drink. Yet he has two bars full of 
the choicest liquors. He doesn't smoke. Yet 
he has a complete assortment of cigars 
and cigarettes. He can splice a cigarette 
with a rifle shot. Yet he never shoots. For 
ten years he danced on the stage ; today, 
when he takes a girl out, he insists he can't 
dance a step! 

When he goes to the movies and doesn't 
like the show, he talks right out loud and 
says what he wants. When he doesn't like 
a person, he does the same. Once he told 
Laura Lorraine, who was with him on a 
few Essex House programs, that everyone 
said her singing was terrible. And he 
couldn't understand why she got angry, 
slapped his face, and walked out on him. 

To me, the most pronounced of his char- 
acteristics is his fun-loving spirit, which 
has resulted in so much embarrassment 
to his friends and associates. Let me tell 
you something he pulled on Isidore Zir, his 
very competent but very serious first vio- 
linist. 

One day he and Izzie were going out 
together. It was after a broadcast, and 
they just had time to make their appoint- 
ment. Just before they got started, when 
Izzie reached in to turn the key in the 
car. Dick grabbed it. 

"My, this is a lovely key," Dick said. 
"Is it the only one you've got to the car?" 
Izzie answered truthfully that it was. 

"Of what metal is it made?" Dick 
queried innocently, banging the key. "Does 
it bounce?" 

Before the violinist could stop him, he 
threw it against the wall. Of course, Zir 
couldn't find it. He almost went wild 
searching for it. "I'm ruined," he groaned. 
"Oh, what am I going to do now?" 

After twenty minutes, Dick suddenly got 
an inspiration. "Perhaps you can start 
the car without a key," lie said. 

"What !" exploded the harrassed Issie. 

"Well, let's get in and try," Dick said. 

They got into the car. And there was 
the key in the lock ! 

How was it done? Dick, who is an am- 
ateur magician, had a couple of dummy 
keys palmed in his hand. When he asked. 
"What kind of metal is this." and banged 
the key, he made the switch. 

And then there was the time when Arty 
Shaw, who was first sax with the Himber 
orchestra, and some of the other boys, piled 
into the Shaw chariot, a little Ford, and 
went for a ride. Every few blocks the 
car would stop. Shaw inspected the gas 
tank; the motor; nothing was out of or- 
der. There was plenty of gas. When he 
was about ready to drop, Dick would say 
innocently ; "Maybe the car will start now. 
Give it a try." And sure enough, it went 
beautifully — for a few more blocks. Fin- 
ally Arty doped it out, or so he thought. 
"I guess every time my little buggy hits 



a bump, the key turns and the car is 
locked." he explained apologetically. 

To this day he doesn't know what really 
was the trouble. Dick, seated in the far 
end of the car, had attached an invisible 
horsehair, the kind you use for magic 
tricks, to the key. Whenever he wanted to 
he pulled it, turning the key. Then quite 
as easily, he'd yank it back into moving 
position. 

Don't think the boys sit by with folded 
hands and say nothing to all of Dick's gags. 
One night Johnny Young, the announcer, 
decided to pay Dick back in his own coin. 
He had some of the band members pre- 
tend to be undertakers and called up the 
Essex House where Dick lives, insisting 
there was a corpse in Room 608, Dick's 
room. At 4 a. m. the house detective came 
on the run, and woke Dick up. knocking 
at the door. To make sure there was no' 
hidden corpse, he even examined the apart- 
ment ! 

Finally, though, his friends framed 
Dick. They all know that clowning Mr. 
Himber, boisterous and loud as he is at 
times, becomes quiet and deadly serious 
the minute rehearsals start. Goes haywire 
if anything spoils his program. Insists 
upon absolute cooperation from the entire 
orchestra. A sour note makes him almost 
physically sick. 

This day he came to the studio, set for 
the broadcast. The clock struck eight. 
Dick raised his baton. 

Came a down beat. One of the saxes 
hit a wrong note. "I got sick," Dick told 
me. "I waved with my hand for the men 
to tighten up. Another down beat. An- 
other off-key note. Then they all hit 
wrong notes. I nearly fainted. We were 
on the air !" 

Panicky, Himber stood, white as a sheet, 
while David Ross, the announcer, broke 
in with his usual commercial announce- 
ments. He began in his smooth, golden 
unctuous tones, "This is Stude — -stude — 
ee — baker Champ — Chump — Champion," he 
stuttered out. 

No longer could Himber contain himself. 
"Good heavens." he yelled, "what is going 
on here today at CBS!" 

Then Jean Hight, the head of the CBS 
commercial contact department, who was 
also in on the trick, said: "Surprise! Its 
all a gag!" The boys had turned the clock- 
two minutes ahead ! They were not on 
the air! 

Though Dick Himber is a wizard at 
cards, and enjoys playing, he ordinarily 
refuses to play. But one morning Ken 
Lyons and Irving Mansfield, two of his 
pals, kept bragging all over the place that 
they were the best contract bridge players 
in either circles. Why. they bad beaten 
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pearson, the acknowl- 
edged champions. 

"I'll play you a game," Dick said sud- 
denly. 

"I thought you don't play bridge," Ken 
answered. 

"I've never played contract bridge, but 
I'll beat you," Dick answered. 

Just then Andre Baruch, the announcer, 



RADIO STARS 



walked in. "Andy," I limber said, "do you 
play bridge?" 

"No," said Baruch. "I haven't time for 
such foolishness." 

"Well, you're going to play now," said 
Himber. "I don't play, either, so honors 
are even. There's only one provision I 
make, boys," Dick continued. "And that's 
that we all bid blind." The boys agreed. 
They were jubilant, certain it would be a 
walkaway for them. 

Dick stacked and mixed the cards. 
Baruch cut them. Mansfield dealt them. 
Dick went up to seven spades. Lyons did 
seven no trump, figuring that even if Him- 
ber had dealt himself thirteen spades, he 
could play another suit and so lick him. 
Dick doubled. And won ! He had thir- 
teen spades ; Baruch had thirteen clubs ; 
the other two boys' hands were mixed. 

Himber explained to me: "For fifteen 
years cards have been my hobby. I can 
do anything with a deck of cards. I know 
all the percentages of every gambling 
game in the world. If I won, playing 
legitimately, people would say I was 
crooked. If I lost, they'd say I was just 
kidding. So card playing is out." That's 
the penalty of being too good at it. 

By the same token, Himber never in- 
dulges in pocket billiards. Though years 
ago he won a match from Andrew Ponzi, 
former American Professional Pocket Bil- 
liards champ. In the past six years Dick 
hasn't played a shot, except once. 

One of the men in his orchestra, the 
tenor sax, Bernie Ladd, thought he was 
an expert player, which he is. He kidded 
Dick unmercifully. "I bet it's all a pub- 
licity stunt," he insisted, "you saying you're 
such a fine player. If you think you're so 
good, play a couple of games with me.' 

"But I haven't played for many years," 
Dick insisted. Finally, goaded by Bernie's 
wisecracks about heroes in war who never 
fought a battle, and billiard experts who 
couldn't play, he agreed. 

In the first game Bernie beat him badly. 
In the second game Dick, getting back into 
form, emerged victorious. The score was 
50 to 16. 

"Aw, you were stalling for a bet," Bernie 
and some of the boys insisted. 

"All right," Dick said. "We'll play luck 
pool, so you'll each have a chance." 

That's a game in which each takes a 
number and uses only the particular ball 
with that number. Dick's key ball was 
thirteen. Yet at the end of an hours play, 
he had all the money stacked in front of 
him. 

"Let's go back to the broadcast," Bernie 
finally said meekly, feeling his empty 
pockets. "We're convinced you can play 
anything." 

All the boys got up silently. "Wait a 
minute," Dick said. "I can't take your 
money." He made them divide the huge 
stack of coins among themselves. 

Recently, Himber did something else 
that is quite characteristic of his para- 
doxical personality. 

When he went out of town for a trip, 
he left orders with his secretary, telling 
her what she v/as to do — about the mail, 
about phone calls, about paying the men, 
about handling his private bills. 

Back home, the very first morning, he 
called the girl to his private office. Every- 
thing she had been told to do she had done. 
Yet, very evidently, Himber was not sat- 
isfied. He was sure she had loafed, that 




"I'm Johnson's Baby Powder — the kind that 
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I'm soft as silk — made of the very finest Italian 
Talc. No gritty particles nor orris-root in me. 
And don't forget my team-mates — Johnson's 
Baby Soap and Baby Cream!" 



p °w DEt) 
+ 



59 



RADIO STARS 



YOUR SKIN 

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"How do I rate with you?" asks Eddie Duchin of Gladys Swarthout 
and John Boles. The words are the title of one of Eddie's song 
numbers in "Coronado," and the famous band maestro is working 
on a sound stage adjoining that on which the new Paramount mu- 
sical romance, "The Rose of the Rancho," is now in production. 
Gladys and John are principals in this Paramount picture, and 
they dropped in for a visit with Eddie during their lunch hour. 



she had been idle for days 

"I'll bet you took half days off and 
everything," he said, "while I paid you for 
working." In vain t he girl assured him 
she had done everything there was to do. 
He was adamant. "To make up lor your 
vacation," he finally said, "you'll have to 
work late tonight." He kept her there long 
after her usual dismissal time, dictating 
mail that could have waited till the next 
morning. Accustomed to her unusual boss, 
the girl did as she was told, and said noth- 
ing. 

By the next day Himber was thoroughly 
ashamed of himself. So when he appeared 
at her desk he handed her a package : a 
half-dozen lovely pairs of sheer silk stock- 
ings ! 

To lose weight, a short time ago, Dick 
had to go on a strenuous diet, foregoing 
the rich cakes and sodas that are his de- 
light. Living on orange juice and milk 
and spinach, the sight of which he abomi- 
nates. 

One day when he was out riding, en 
route to Asbury Park for a week's vaca- 
tion, he stopped at a stand and bought 
some corn on the cob, hot and steaming. 
"Dick," his chum said, "corn's no good 



without butter. Do you mean to say you're 
going to eat it plain?' 

"Well, I'll tell you." Dick said. "The 
doctor says / can't put butter on my food. 
I promised him I wouldn't." 

Very conveniently and purposefully, Dick 
turned his back on his buddy, who, realiz- 
ing what was expected of him, smeared 
the corn with butter. Which Dick ate with 
evident relish ' 

Himber has never had much of a formal 
education. His early experiences in honky 
tonk cafes, certainly are not supposed to 
create any high standards, an insatiable 
quench for knowledge and good manners. 
Yet lie reads Shakespeare, Balzac, Shelley, 
Sara Teasdale. Without an ounce of train- 
ing, he had become a really fine interior 
decorator. 1 wisli you could sec his bachelor 
apartment at the Essex House. Every bit 
of furniture he had designed himself. Loud? 
Raucous? As you might expect of a rough 
diamond? It's all subdued, dignified, done 
in the best of taste. 

There's just one infallible rule in the 
Himber apartment. You can't smoke. Be- 
cause the smell of tobacco makes Dick 
sick 1 

The End 



60 



RADIO STARS 



Her skin looked 
dull, sallow 



{Continued from page 15) 

ability to back up his chatter with his 
performances on the pitching mound. 

During the 1934 world series, I was 
assigned to cover the Deans. It was my 
job to chat with the two boys daily, be- 
fore and after the games, and let the do- 
ings of the other players go hang. With 
Diz dofng all the talking, while Paul 
looked on in open-mouthed admiration, 
there never was a dearth of copy. Some- 
times there would be discrepancies be- 
tween what Diz told me and what he told 
other writers, but he never could be 
pinned down. 

"I wouldn't wanna tell all you boys the 
same thing," he would say with a laugh 
by way of explanation. "If you get dif- 
ferent stories, then everybody has a scoop 
or whatever you call it, and there's no 
harm done. Trust ole' Diz !" 

So much for the personality of the 
man who bids fair to be the first sports 
figure of radio, the Number One man. 
Paul will tag along with him, for Diz will 
insist on it. The younger Dean is content 
to let Diz do the talking for both, but 
Paul is not backward before a mike. He 
showed plenty of stage presence in their 
skit at New York's Roxy theatre last 
winter. 

Because of the rapidity with which Diz 
changes his tune, it is difficult to deter- 
mine his broadcasting plans for next year, 
if any. That he has a $15,000 contract with 
General Foods for this year is known, but, 
so far, his exploitation has been limited 
to cartoons in the comic section, with no 
radio work. 

During the visit of the Cardinals to New 
York in mid-August, Dean made several 
electrical transcriptions, although he didn't 
know that they were called that. It was 
rumored later that the company remade 
them all with an imitator to get the stut- 
ters out of the two-cylinder words. If so, 
it's readily understandable. 

In the first place, Diz is a poor reader, 
even as Ruth was. There is something 
about the printed word that brings out 
stammers in the best of us. Reading script, 
as radio artists found out years ago, is a 
profession in itself. The pauses, inflections 
and other trivia were too much for our 
Diz. On top of that, he had a heavy sum- 
mer cold, the Giants were in first place and 
he had to pitch an important game against 
them in that series. For the purposes of 
the record, he did pitch that important 
game and won it, too, beating Hal Schu- 
macher by 1-0. 

As a guest star, Dizzy was on the Shell 
hour with Al Jolson and his brother Paul, 
a bit that enabled them to split $800 or 
$900 between them. Diz also went on with 
Kate Smith and made $400 or $500 for 
that appearance. 

What Dean receives for his furniture 
broadcasts in East St. Louis is something 
only Diz and his sponsor know. The 
pitcher was haled before the august Com- 
missioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis in 
Chicago this summer because papers quoted 




Miss Rosalie de Forest Crosby, a beautiful brunette 

"The right powder makes it 
brilliant/ 7 Color Analyst said 

Here's a girl who thought all brunette 
powder shades were alike. Dark-haired 
with pale creamy skin, she had been 
using "just any" brunette powder. Her 
skin looked sallow with it — yellowish. 
Pond's Color Analyst told her why: "Too 
dull a shade." He smoothed on Pond's Bru- 
nette. "Why, this brightens my skin!" 
Her coloring looked positively alive! 

Don't THINK Pond's Brunette is 
like any other brunette shade. Nor 
Pond's Rose Cream like any other blonde 
powder! They're not. Pond's Powder 
shades are the result of a new discovery 
that adds life to every skin. 

With an optical machine, Pond's color- 
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they found that dazzling blonde skin 
owes its transparency to a hidden blue 
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invisibly in Pond's new Face Powder. 



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Natural — lighter — a delicate flesh tint 
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So delicate, it cannot clog. 



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Copyright, 1935. Pond's Extract Company 



61 



RADIO STARS 




WHAT wouldn't she give to hear it 
ring? To hear a girl friend's voice: 
"Come on down, Kit. The bunch is here!" 

Or more important: "This is Bill. How 
about the club dance Saturday night?" 

• • I • 

The truth is, Bill would ask her. And so 
would the girls. If it weren't for the fact 
that underarm perspiration odor makes 
her so unpleasant to be near. 

What a pity it is! Doubly so, since per- 
spiration odor is so easy to avoid. With 
Mum! 

Just half a minute is all you need to use 
Mum. Then you're safe for the whole day! 

Use Mum any time, even after you're 
dressed. For it's harmless to clothing. 

It's soothing to the skin, too — so 
soothing you can use it right after shaving 
your underarms. 

Mum doesn't prevent perspiration. But 
it docs prevent every trace of perspiration 
odor. Use it daily and you'll never be 
guilty of personal unpleasantness. Bristol- 
Myers, Inc., 75 West St., New York. 

MUM 

TAKES THE ODOR OUT 
OF PERSPIRATION 

ANOTHER WAY MUM HELPS is on sanitary 
napkins. Use it for this and you'll never have 
to worry about this cause of unpleasantness. 

62 





mono, of the Paul Whiteman orchestra. 



Dean as, saying that he couldn't get enough 
money from the St. Louis club and that 
his radio sponsor, Dick Slack, was mak- 
ing up the difference. 

When Diz went on the carpet, he 
flashed a contract purporting to call for 
$5,000 for the season on the air. Then 
later Diz told his manager, Bill DeWitt, 
who also is treasurer of the Cardinal or- 
ganization, not to believe everything he 
heard about the contract. St. Louis base- 
ball writers insist that the contract is 
strictly the "phonus bolonus" and that Diz 
gets a great deal less than that for his 
furniture broadcasts. 

Dean told a story last year that Slack 
paid him at the rate of $100 for every game 
lie won. At that rate, the Diz made him- 
self $3,000, for he won thirty games for 
the Redbirds last year. Again, no one can 
say for certain how true this is. That's 
one thing about Diz — you've got to take 
plenty of salt with all information from 
headquarters, meaning Diz himself. And 
sometimes pepper, mustard and ketchup 
help, too ! 

Whatever else he is, Dean is not a 
business man. During the world series 
last year, Diz was so rushed by theatrical 
and radio-hooking agents, endorsement- 
seekers and barnstorming promoters that 
it's a wonder he was ahle to win any 
games in the series, let alone two. He got 
one good night's sleep during the series 
— in a St. Louis hospital the nigh: after he 
was bcaned hy Bili Rogell's throw and 
was believed to be suffering from a brain 
concussion. And iie lost his only game of 
the series the next day, so apparently 
sleep is not a prerequisite in his winning 
formula. 

Swamped on all sides hy agents, besieged 
by admirers and a constant target for in- 
terviewers during the series, Dean decided 
in the middle of it to change business- 
managers. Asking J. Roy Stockton, a 
St. Louis baseball writer who has gratui- 



tously given Diz a million dollars wort 
of advice, to take him to Commissione 
Landis, Dean had his contract with DeW'it 
abrogated. That was about ten A. M. Be 
fore he left for the park at eleven-thirty 
Dean had signed another contract. And th 
party of the second part was again De 
Witt ! So much for Dean, the business 
man. 

Diz can talk on his feet and talk en- 
tertainingly, too. He made an excellent 
speech at the annual dinner of the New 
York Chapter of Baseball Writers at the 
Hotel Commodore last February. And he 
wasn't a bit awed appearing on the same 
bill with such renowned post-prandial ora- 
tors as the late Will Rogers, Hey wood 
Broun, and other notables. 

Since talking over the microphone of a 
public address system is no different from 
talking from a studio, it stands to reason 
that Dean will draw a good response, if 
given the proper coaching and workable 
material. Occasionally when the Cardinals 
play an exhibition game at a park featur- 
ing a public address system. Dean, if he 
feels at all playful, will grab the mike 
and clown as master of ceremonies. His 
humor is homely, and not biting, and in- 
variably gets across in a big way. His 
nasal drawl, reminiscent of his Oklahoma 
boyhood, doesn't grate on the ears. 

The fact that neither of the Deans has 
reached his peak augurs well for their 
radio chances. When Ruth went on the 
air. he already was in the sere and yellow 
of his career. The Babe was Hearing forty, 
in the last of his full baseball years and 
was talking on a program designed to make 
breakfast foods edible and interesting to 
ten-year-olds who were toddling infants 
wher Babe himself was the Colossus of 
Clou;. 

With the Deans, it is a different story. 
Paul is twenty-three and Diz is a year 
older. Paul has concluded his second full] 
season in the major leagues and Dean his 



RADIO STARS 



fourth. It takes no mature baseball fan 
to remember the highlights of their careers, 
as was the case when Babe went on the 
air. 

Because the Deans, or I should say, be- 
cause Diz lias the gift of saying almost 
exactly what people want him to say, the 
pair has acquired considerable stature with 
the sports public of America. When Diz 
refuses to pitch an exhibition game and 
Paul rebelliously stands his ground and 
says, "If Diz won't go, I won't, neither!" 
it strikes a responsive chord with the 
sport fans. When he publicly makes up 
with Manager Frankic Frisch and says, 
"I know I ain't bin right, Frank, but I'll 
show you from now on. Me 'n Paul'll 
pitch every dad-blamed game if you ask 
us," he again scores a ten-strike. 

Dean's temperamental outbursts have 
been condoned by sport fans because of the 
sincerity of his repentance. That and the 
fact that he has invariably delivered the 
promised number of victories by way of 
atonement. 

There is nothing of the swell-head 
about either of the boys. Last October, 
the day before the series opened in De- 
troit, Ruth, there in a reportorial capacity, 
called Dean on the phone to wish him 
luck and, incidentally, to give him some 
sound advice about spotlight behavior. 
Babe, baseball's Number One man for a 
long time, knew all the pitfalls and de- 
tours. 

When Diz heard that Ruth was on the 
phone, he thought he was being kidded. 
He acted as pleased over Babe's visit as 
though he was Flmer Hoskins, aged 
eleven, from Pumpkin Creek, Kansas, in- 
stead of Dizzy Dean, the headline man of 
the hour. Hardly the behavior of one who 
sometimes is accused of being conceited. 
For the first few minutes of his talk with 
Babe, he called h im "Mister Ruth"' until 
the big fellow himself became embarrassed. 

Having been through the first flurry of 
stardom, both the Deans know what it's 
all about by now. They have dabbled just 
enough in radio to know that it holds pos- 
sibilities for them. They know, too, that 
thar's gold in them thar mikes. 

Should Diz and Paul emerge as steady 
radio performers by next summer, don't 
be surprised. Radio and sports have much 
in common and the time is near for some- 
one to bridge the gap. And I know of none 
more ca